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The St. Mary's Muse. 



OPENING NUMBER. 



ol. XVII. October, 1912. No. 1 

God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this School 
ith thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with the light of 
j.e everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; increase in us 
[ue religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great mercy keep us in 
[e same, blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the Son, together, we 
lorship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



The Opening of the Seventy-first Session 



The simple opening service in the Chapel on Thursday morning, 
eptember 19th, marked the beginning of St. Mary's seventy-first year, 
.lthough it was a rainy and disagreeable day, both teachers and girls 
ere on hand and in readiness for the new year. The new girls had 
rrived on Monday and Tuesday and the old girls on Wednesday, so 
i large part of the registration had been attended to, and school duties 
ould begin at once, as has been customary since the present Rector has 
een at St. Mary's. 

And in the service itself, the usual order was followed. The pro- 
sssion formed at 9 :00 in the school, and marched into the Chapel 
nging the familiar Processional hymn, "Holy, Holy, Holy." There 
7 ere brief addresses by Mr. Lay and the Bishop, after shortened Morn- 
ag Prayer, and then singing, the procession moved back into the school- 
Dom, there to disband and to go to other duties. 



(In Overflowing School 



The present year is notable for having the largest registration in the 
istory of the school — 182 boarders being enrolled, 32 more than ever 
efore. The total number that can be accommodated within the 
chool is 175, since the building of the new wings in 1909, so that seven 
iris have been placed temporarily in the homes of members of the 
acuity. 

14164 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



With the Girls of 1912-1913 



The Muse, as usual, gives a list of the St. Mary's girls for the year 
hoping that it will be of interest and value as in former years. It is i 
longer list than ever before, and shows more girls from greater dis 
tances than we have had before. The girls from the South are distrib 
uted about as as usual, with perhaps a few more from Georgia and Flor 
ida than last year. Seven girls are from Savannah alone. Amonj 
the girls from farther away, are four girls, the two Warings, Avis Bis 
sell and Elizabeth Smith, all from the same place in New York State 
Ada French and May Vose from Illinois, Frances Sears from Texas 
Josephine Wilson from Mexico, Maude Randall from New Jersey 
and Helen Benson from Ohio. 

The girls from Maryland and Virginia are increased this year b; 

Shirley Dashiel from Cambridge, Maryland; Katherine Nottingham 

of Eastville, and several girls from Portsmouth and Norfolk. Thi 

list given below shows the home towns of all the boarding pupils : 

Adams, Gussie Lavine Cary, N. C. 

Aiken, Buford Brunswick, Ga. 

Allen, Julia Goldsboro, N. C. 

Allen, Mary Hickory, N. C. 

Badham, Bessie Edenton, N. C. 

Benson, Helen Toledo, Ohio. 

Bissell, Avis Bedford, N. Y. 

Blakeley, Marguerite Griffin, Ga. 

Blount, Claire Pensacola, Fla. 

Bond, Julia Edenton, N. C. 

Boone, Janet Georgetown, S C. 

Bouknight, Emma Johnston, S. C. 

Boyden, Jennie Belle Knoxville, Tenn. 

Branch, Annie Shepherd Wilson, N. C. 

Brigham, Gertrude Louise Murray Hill, N. J. 

Brigman, Lottie Rockingham, N. C. 

Budge, Dorothy Wakefield, R. I. 

Bunn, Katherine Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Burdine, Bessie Miami, Fla. 

Butler, Mary Henderson, N. C. 

Butt, Catherine Norfolk, Va. 

Calmes, Eleanor Laurinburg, N. C. 

Cameron, Annie S Hillsboro, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Campbell, Elizabeth Atlanta, Ga. 

Candler, Elizabeth Savannah, Ga. 

Candler, Leonore Savannah, Ga. 

Carrison, Elizabeth Camden, S. C. 

Clark, Edith Wilmington, N. C. 

Clark, Laura P Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Clark, Placide Tarboro, N. C. 

Clarke, Florence Middletown, N. C. 

Cleaton, Carrie Portsmouth, Va. 

Condrey, Katherine Enfield, N. C. 

Cooper, Fannie Henderson, N. C. 

Cooper, Julia Oxford, N. C. 

Cooper, Sophronia Oxford, N. C. 

Cornish, Gertrude Abbeville, S. C. 

Crowther, Courtney Savannah, Ga. 

Dashiell, Shirley Cambridge, Md. 

Davis, Virginia Wilson, N. C. 

DeRossett, Tallulah New York City. 

Disbro, Mary Atlanta, Ga. 

Dortch, Mary Goldsboro, N. C. 

Douglas, Ruth Preston, Md. 

Durkee, Louise ^ Griffin, Ga. 

Edwards, Helen Spring Hope, N. C. 

Elliott, Kate Hickory, N. C. 

Fairley, Dorothy Rockingham, N. C. 

Floyd, Mary St. Stephens, S. C. 

Flythe, Agnes Augusta, Ga. 

French, Ada Chicago, 111. 

Galbraith, Selma Waverley Mills, S. C. 

Gallup, Penelope New York City 

Geitner, Frances Hickory, N. C. 

Gibson, Mildred Gibson, N. C. 

Gibson, Willie Gibson, N. C. 

Gold, S. Elizabeth Wilson, N. C. 

Grant, Mary Wilmington, N. C. 

Graves, Mary Franklin Mt. Airy, N. C. 

Grayson, Lynne Savannah, Ga. 

Griswold, Mary Bryan Durham, N. C. 

Grogan, Elizabeth Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Guyer, Minnie Thomasville, N. C. 

Hales, Lanie Wilson, N. C. 

Hancock, Matilda New Bern, N. C. 

Harris, Helen Henderson, N. C. 

Hartridge, Helen Jacksonville, Fla. 

Herbert, Leone Morehead City, N. C. 

Heyward, Sallie Beaufort, S. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Hill, Eleanor Augusta, Ga. 

Hodgson, Anna Jacksonville, Fla. 

Hood, Dorothy Greensboro, N. C. 

Hopkins, Dorothy Onancock, Va. 

Hopkins, Marie Brunswick, Ga. 

Hoppe, Laura Margaret Marietta, Ga. 

Hunt, Janie Oxford, N. C. 

Johnson, Ellen Knoxville, Tenn. 

Johnston, Adelaide Hickory, N. C. 

Jones, Caroline Mt. Mitchell, N. C. 

Jordan, Margaret Portsmouth, Va. 

Kerr, Janie Clinton, N. C. 

King, Annie Belle Louisburg, N. C. 

King, Francisca Stamford, Conn. 

Kyle, Rebecca Jacksonville, Fla. 

Lamb, Nannie Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Lassiter, Katherine Oxford, N. C. 

Lewis, Flora Statesville, N. C. 

Lockhart, Caroline Wadesboro, N. C. 

London, Camelia Pittsboro, N. C. 

London, May Charlotte, N. C. 

Mann, Edith Middletown, N. C. 

Mann, Edna Middletown, N. C. 

Mann, Margaret Middletown, N. C. 

Maxwell, Evelyn Pensacola, Fla. 

Meggs, Kate Jacksonville, Fla. 

Michaux, Mary Goldsboro, N. C. 

Miller, Fannie Trenton, S. C. 

Montgomery, Kate Spartanburg, S. C. 

Moore, Mabel Wilson, N. C. 

McCullers, Melba Clayton, N. C. 

McGary, Margaret Durham, N. C. 

Mclver, Josephine Society Hill, S. C. 

Mclver, Susie Cheraw, S. C. 

McKenzie, Alice Salisbury, N. C. 

McKenzie, Elizabeth Salisbury, N. C. 

MacMinn, Marion Pinebluff, N. C. 

Nicholson, Mary Athens, Ga. 

Northcott, Helene Winston, N. C. 

Nottingham, Katherine Eastville, Va. 

Nottingham, Mildred Chesapeake, Va. 

Overman, Grace Salisbury, N. C. 

Palmer, Eliza Gulf, N. C. 

Parker, Dorothy Asheville, N. C. 

Patterson, Helen Wilson, N. C. 

Pender, Frances Norfolk, Va. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Peoples, Helen Keats, Va. 

Prairie, Belle Afton, Va. 

Pride, Helen Portsmouth, Va. 

Pritchett, Elizabeth Jacksonville, Pla. 

Pugh, Lois Savannah, Ga. 

Quinerly, Sallie Bett Ayden, N. C. 

Randall, Maude Bloomfield, N. J. 

Rawlings, Susan Wilson, N. C. 

Rees, Julia Charleston, S. C. 

Reese, Agnes Savannah, Ga. 

Reynolds, Maude Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Robertson, Mary McBee, S. C. 

Rogers, Winifred Jacksonville, Pla. 

Rosser, Ruth Atlanta, Ga. 

Rowe, Julia Tarboro, N. C. 

Rowland, Janie Middleburg, N. C. 

Salisbury, Mary Portsmouth, Va. 

Sears, Prances Houston, Texas. 

Sedberry, Ruth Fayetteville, N. C. 

Sherman, Virginia Goldsboro, N. C. 

Sherrerd, Ellen \ Charlottesville, Va. 

Skinner, Eliza Beaufort, N. C. 

Smith, Clara Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Smith, Elizabeth Katonah, N. Y. 

Smith, Josephine Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Smith, Mary C Charlotte, N. C. 

Smith, Olive Washington, D. C. 

Stanford, Marian Princess Anne, Md. 

Stanton, Clara High Point, N. C. 

Stewart, Mary Charlottesville, Va. 

Stiles, Elise Malbone, Ga. 

Strong, Prances Raleigh, N. C. 

Tarry, Elizabeth Woodsworth, N. C. 

Taylor, Mary Greensboro, N. C. 

Thomas, Elizabeth Rockingham, N. C. 

Thomas, Margaret Durham, N. C. 

Tucker, Earle Grifton, N. C. 

Turpin, Anne Page Macon, Ga. 

Turpin, Virginia Macon, Ga. 

Tyson, Mary Carthage, N. C. 

Underwood, Janie Fayetteville, N. C. 

Vinson, Sadie Littleton, N. C. 

Vose, Mary Macomb, 111. 

Walker, Frances Edenton, N. C. 

Ward, Katherine Weldon. N. C. 

Waring, Cornelia Bedford, N. Y. 



The St. Maby's Muse. 



Waring, Elizabeth Bedford, N. Y. 

Warren, Myrtle Greenville, N. C. 

Warren, Pencie Edenton, N. C. 

Washburn, Mary Lillington, N. C. 

Webb, Adriana Houston, Va. 

Webb, Ovid Houston, Va. 

Welsh, Sara Monroe, N. C. 

White, Bessie Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Wilkinson, Rosalie Charlotte, N. C. 

Williams, Annie Belle Fayetteville, N. C. 

Willis, Mary Yorkville, S. C. 

Wilson, Josephine San Luis Potosi, Mexico. 

Winston, Amy Raleigh, N. C. 

Winston, Lizzie Selma, N. C. 

Wood, Marion Brunswick, Ga. 

Wood, Nellie Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Woodruff, Jennie Summerville, S. C. 

Wright, Helen Boardman, N. C. 

Wright, Martha Boardman, N. C. 

The non-resident girls include the following : 

Academic Department 

Marion Baker Alice Lacy 

Mamie Ball Hattie Lasater 

Adelyn Barbee Elizabeth Lay 

Vivian Betts Margaret Leard 

Eunice Blair Lizzie Lee 

Virginia Bonner Albertine Moore 

Mary Hilda Bradley Flora McDonald 

Helen Brown Nettie Perkins 

Susanne Busbee Lilian Riddick 

Elizabeth Cherry Henrietta Schwartz 

Lillian Chesson Evelyn Sears 

Mabel Cohen Kate Hale Silver 

Grace Crews Leah Smith 

Marie Curtice Mary Belle Stephenson 

Elizabeth Dortch Florence Stone 

Sara Fenner Ethel Swann 

Sarah Gatling Susie Taylor 

Nathalie Gould Elizabeth Walker 

Mildred Holding Frances Walters 

Louise Huggins Laurie Weathers 

Sue Kitchin Gladys Yates 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Preparatory A 



Belle Cameron 
Bessie Folk 
Alice Giersch 
Elizabeth Hughes 
Katherine Hughes 
Julia Jerman 
Ellen Lay 

Nannie Arnold 
Harriet Barber 
Mary L. Barrow 
Ella Blacknall 
Elizabeth Cross 
Florence Harrison 
Randolph Hill 
Mary Hoke 
Mary King 

"Windham Ashe 
Elizabeth Baker 
Katherine Baker 
Adelaide Boylston 
Cicely Browne 
Sallie Cameron 
Charlotte Johnson 
Isabel Jones 

Mrs. Ashe 

Essie Baker 

Mr. Bayne 

Annie Bowen 

Eunice Bowen 

Isabel Bowen 

Mary Elizabeth Bowen 

Florence Busbee 



Marie Linehan 
Margaret Newsom 
Elizabeth Telfair 
Irene Tyree 
Agnes Timberlake 
Josephine Williford 



Sub-Preparatory 



Primary 



Special 



Anna Lay 
Lucy Lay 
Susan Linehan 
Virginia Royster 
Lilias Shepherd 
Lillian Smith 
Helen C. Snow 
Frances Williams 



Virginia Lay 
Mary S. Morgan 
Jean McCarty 
Roella Robbins 
Carrine Rosenthal 
Janie Helen Staudt 
Mildred Williford 
Elizabeth Woolcott 

Helen Jones 
Ruth Lee 
Eleanor Mann 
Sadie Parker 
Frances Sears 
A. Olivia Smith 
Mr. South 
Lina Stephenson 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



AMY WINSTON and MARY BUTLER, Editors. 



Travel Sketch 



Climbing the Alps 



Amy C. Winston. 

Were it not for my diary it would be hard to believe now that eight 
of us St. Mary Mary's girls with Miss Thomas, really did climb the 
Alps — but it is true and nothing could be more fun or give just the 
sensation we had that day. 

It was the middle of July and the temperature such that our words 
of greeting in the mornings were "Merry Xmas." We left Baveno, a 
beautiful resort on the Italian lakes, at noon one Wednesday, to see the 
most noted scenery in the Alps. Late that afternoon, after having 
been through the longest tunnel in the world — thirty-two minutes — we 
changed from the regular European train to the queerest little moun- 
tain train that seemed to run by magic — neither chafTeur, engineer nor 
motorman — and instead of climbing around the mountain, it went 
straight up. As we were the only people on the car we sat in the back, 
which was enclosed entirely in glass — nine of us sitting on the floor. 
By kneeling and holding to an iron rod we could see straight down for 
miles, deep gorges and ravines, with waterfalls gushing between them 
with a tremendous roar. Above us we could see the snow-capped moun- 
tains and the little streams cf melted snow. The surrounding condi- 
tions, a heavy gray cloud, a misty rain and the very cold temperature 
made all of us think of home, and we discussed cheery, open fires, 
waffles and fried chicken. About dusk our spirits began to fall — 
everything was so quiet and unusual, and the scenery so overpowering 
we were impressed with our utter helplessness. We seemed at the end 
of the world, with no signs of humanity, just huge rocks and scrawny 
trees, and we so far from home. 

Finally we reached the much-talked of Chamonix, the quaintest lit- 
tle town at the foot of Mont Blanc. Of course we went to bed early, 
since we were to do some real mountain climbing the next day. At six 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



the next morning came that well known little knock of Miss Thomas's 
(familiar to all of us who have been caught out of our rooms). As 
we started on our climb a half hour later we remarked how glad we 
were that none of our friends could see us. Our costumes were ridicu- 
lous — hats turned straight up in front with a single feather pointing 
upward (imitating the Swiss) and shoes at least four inches wide, with 
no heels. In this garb and with our Alpine sticks, we looked like genu- 
ine climbers. The air was bracing, so we started off almost in a run. 
We were aiming for the Mer de Glace, but in less than half an hour that 
snow-capped mountain looked twice as far away as when we started, 
and we found the rocks along the way very soft comfortable seats. 
After an hour we were a little less stiff and found climbing great fun. 
The view in the valley below was beautiful — the peaceful village with 
cattle grazing and the green and yellow fields with the clear stream of 
water running between, and the little church on one side. It was a 
funny picture to see us sitting along the side of the road watching other 
climbers pass us, our mouths wide open with amazement at the speed 
and ease with 'which they climbed. They were very attractive — 
women in tweed suits, short skirts, spiked shoes, and hats cocked up in 
front with a feather. The men wore short trousers and leggings, with 
Norfolk jackets and tweed hats, with the feather the same as the women 
wore. About eleven o'clock all of us were worn out except Miss 
Thomas, who really ran the entire way like a mountain goat, and then 
said, "JSTo, she wasn't tired !" I remember, though, how she welcomed 
a bottle of German beer at the little Swiss chalet at which we stopped. 
After another hour's climbing we were in sight of the hotel at the 
top of the "Mer de Glace" — six thousand feet above sea level — and a 
queer feeling came over us similar to that of walking on air. Our ears 
felt as though they would burst, and our voices sounded miles away, 
but the snow ahead spurred us on and we ended the tramp with a hun- 
dred yards clash at the side of the "sea of glass," the most beautiful 
glacier in the Alps. It is rightly named for the irregular surface 
looks precisely like an ocean of tossing waves which have been crystal- 
lized. Scattered over this irregular surface were huge boulders in 
distorted shapes, and between them were chasms of unknown depth. 
2 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The glacier is apparently still, but is really moving downward all the 
time and when we were standing by the side of it we could hear the 
strange noise which it made as it moved. We could hear the echo, 
from the foot of the glacier, of the huge blocks of ice as they were rent 
asunder from the glacier, and slid down into the valley below. Five 
very venturesome men, with the aid of guides, ropes, and ladders were 
crossing the glacier but we were content with snow-balling by the side. 
Miss Thomas felt so refreshed from her walk up the mountain that 
she was anxious to start down again, and Margaret Erwin, as tired as 
she was, felt it her "duty" to see Miss Thomas safely down. ■ The rest 
of us, however, enjoyed riding down in a funicular, and found it much 
easier to appreciate the scenery than when walking up ! 



An Every-Day Sketch 



A Typical St. Mary's Monday 



Ellen A. Johnson. 

The last girls, finding that Sidney had already closed the dining- 
room door, and that they were certain to be reported tardy, sank back 
against the wall and smoothed out hair ribbons and ties. 

"Oh, dear!" sighed one, "I was sure I would be on time; I began to 
dress fully fifteen minutes ago !" After Chapel and assembly, the girls 
tumbled pell-mell into the postoffi.ce and besieged Miss Sutton and 
her two assistants with demands for letters and stamps, books, paper, 
pencils and whatever else could be charged. 

"Helen, oh Helen, our permission is signed," shouted one girl to 
another, as she waved the precious slip, and rushed to her room to dress 
for the joyously anticipated trip down town, which, of course, meant 
a visit to B — 's and R — 's. About ten, the girls began gathering, from 
all parts of the grounds in the parlor, and soon small groups were 
formed around each chaperone, the new girls openly commenting on 
such of the old ones as were allowed to chaperone others, or go with 
some special friend, who was regarded as being above reproach. An 
hour or two later one or two of the fortunate ones came slowly back, 
and shortly before lunch the whole "regiment" came trooping in, chat- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

ting gaily over its purchases and shouting to the poor unfortunates, 
who were restricted for some utterly unaccountable reason, of the treas- 
ers that were to be sent out later. 

In the afternoon, girls in light dresses strolled slowly through the 
grove, discussing, in hushed voices, the new faculty or calling joyously 
to one another news of some very important event, such as the arrival 
of an express package. After dinner they filled the Chapel quickly 
and quietly and ended a pleasant holiday with the beautiful evening 



Soliloquy of a Three-Year-Old. ' 



[ Translated into the language of grown up people.] 

Mary B. Butler. 

I wonder why it is that grown-ups act so queer sometimes ! They 
do such funny things, and then just expect us little ones to accept them 
as a matter of course without any explanation at all. The first time 
I ever realized what queer things they do, was when I went to church 
yesterday for the first time. Why is it that people don't like church? 
I'm crazy about it — that is, the little bit I saw of it, for I wasn't 
allowed to stay very long. You see I am spending the summer with 
my grandmother; and as I had been especially good all the week (not 
having had more than two spankings on any one day!) I was allowed 
to go to church yesterday, as a reward. That wonderful word "church !" 
Whenever daddy hears mother say, "Time to get ready for church, 
dear," he always looks franctically around for something to lean 
against ; and the affair generally ends by mother going off alone and 
daddy staying at home with a bad headache, and I'm told to be awfully 
quiet and not to disturb poor, sick daddy. I can't understand why it is 
that a good book or the Sunday paper always seems to make daddy 
well just as soon as mother leaves home. 

But to go back to the subject of church. I don't see why people 
don't like to go, for I liked my one time awfully well, even if I did get 
sleepy. I marched straight up the aisle with Grandmother and Auntie 
and we turned in at what I thought was a little tiny street, but I found 
out afterwards that you call it a pew. I was awful glad to sit down 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



and rest, for I really did get tired walking so fast because Auntie was 
afraid we'd be late. Pretty soon, a pretty lady began to play on the 
organ and everybody began to sing. Now, grandmother had told me 
to sing when everybody else did, so why did all the little boys 
and girls in front of me turn around and laugh, I was only singing 
"Mary had a little lamb" as loud as I could. And how was I know 
that everybody else was going to stop suddenly and let me sing out loud 
all by myself? They all looked at me so funny then, that I just 
swung on to auntie's skirt and hid my face. 

After awhile, a man with a long white and black dress on read out 
of a book, and just because I didn't like the story he was reading us, 
and pulled the little girl's hair in front of me, grandmother kept tell- 
ing me to be good or I couldn't have any dessert for dinner. What 
could I do ? ISTone of the old books had any pictures in them, and I 
was just beginning to think daddy must be right and that church wasn't 
a very nice place after all, when I saw a big old worm crawling up the 
back of a man across the street from 'us. I began wondering whether 
he would crawl down his collar, but then I forgot to watch him, for the 
man in the white and black dress went into a little stand over on one 
side and began to spread out his arms and say something in a very 
sleepy tone, and I was just beginning to get nice and comfortable 
against grandmother's arm, when auntie took me by the hand and out 
we walked before I realized what we were doing ! Of course I wanted 
to go back ; and I didn't get my dessert for dinner that day after all, as 
I cried so loud when I found I couldn't, I did so want to see what the 
funny man was doing. 

But in spite of all my trouble, I still like church fine ; and I would 
advise any one who has never been to try it just one time. But first 
be sure and make your grandmother promise that you can stay until the 
end. For, although auntie insists that they wouldn't, yet I never will 
believe that maybe they wouldn't have given me some dessert there, if 
I could only have stayed ! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



SCHOOL NEWS 



JULIA ALLEN and REBECCA KYLE, Editors. 



The Opening Reception 

Quite unique was the opening reception given by the old girls to the 
new girls Saturday night, September 21, for it combined a reception, 
dance, and party all in one, given in honor of the new girls. The re- 
ception;, however, had still another object: that the old girls should 
know the new girls, and that the new girls should know each other. 

Everything had been planned before hand. Each old girl was to 
take two new girls. Yes, two, because there are twice as many 
new girls as old. There were to be ten dances, so-called, to last five 
minutes each. The old girls were to make out their own cards (of 
course there were cards and they were tied with St. Mary's colors, too), 
with old girls. Also, they must make out both their j^artner's cards. 
Every five minutes when the "big bell" rang, the old girls, instead of 
having their dance with each other, were simply to exchange partners. 
During these five-minute "dances" you could dance, walk, sit and 
talk, or do anything else you pleased. 

When 8 :00 o'clock came and the ringing of the "big bell" summoned 
all to the parlor for the first "dance," every one was excited and inter- 
ested to see how the plan was going to work. And did it work ? 

Well — yes ! now, didn't it, though ? But, oh, such a bustle and con- 
fusion ! Did you ever in all your life see people work (?) so hard, 
or so fast, before ? But just think of having only five minutes to get 
acquainted with two new girls ! You see, there was all their past, 
present, and future history to be found out, as well as who they knew 
that you knew, too. And when, as often happened, they knew just 
lots of people you knew, why then — Oh, dear, didn't you just hate 
to hear that old "big bell" ring? 

Oh, yes, indeed, the reception was a grand success ! All the girls, old 
and new alike, will admit that, even those whose partners forgot them 
while lingering too long over the punch ( ?) bowl ; the punch, which 
was served in the Muse room, was so exceedingly good that it is not to 
be wondered at that many ignored the ringing of the bell, but all the 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



same it was not very pleasant to be hunting high and low for your part- 
ner, when all the time she was down in the Muse room with the punch 
— right where you wanted to be yourself. 

But even under such tragic circumstances no one lost her temper, for 
every one was having too good a time for that. Besides, we were all 
on our very best behavior — trying to make a good impression, you 
know. Let's hope we all succeeded! Anyway, let's just imagine we 
did and not wish, like the poet, "to see ourselves as others see us." 



The Juvenile Party 



On Saturday night, twenty-eighth of September, the dignified St. 
Mary's girls, as little boys and little girls, frolicked back of the wings 
in the light from the Japanese lanterns at the Juvenile Party which the 
old girls gave to the new. All joined enthusiastically in "Ring around 
the Roses," "Raise the Gates as High as the Sky," "Drop the Handker- 
chief," etc., while eating innumerable sticks of peppermint candy. 
However, since such young folks aren't allowed to stay up late under 
any condition, the children left at the early hour of nine having had the 
"time of their young lives." 



Muse Club Entertained 



At nine o'clock on Friday night, September twenty-seventh, Mr. 
and Mrs. Cruikshank entertained the old and new members of the 
Muse Club, and several members of the faculty — Miss Schenck, Miss 
Sutton, Miss Shattuck and Miss Bottum, at their home in Senior Hall. 
Delicious refreshments were served by Misses Elizabeth Thomas and 
Ovid Webb, consisting of sandwiches and hot chocolate, ice-cream and 
cake. No one except those who have experienced the hospitality of 
Mrs. Cruikshank can realize how fast time flew and how all too soon 
the light-bell brought to an end the most pleasant of evenings. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



The Faculty Recital 



The opening concert of the Advent Term was given in the Audi- 
torium on Monday evening, September 23, by members of the Music 
Faculty. The following program was rendered: 

PROGRAMME. 

1. Ballade in A flat Chopin 

Miss Ella Dobroh 

2. (a) Voi Che Sapete (Figaro) Mozart 

( 6 ) Serenata Moszkowski 

Miss Ada Parke 
(Miss Graves at the piano) 

3. Witches Dance MacDowell 

Miss Edna Graves 

4. (a) "How's My Boy?" Sidney Homer 

(6) "I Know a Lovely Garden" d' Hardelot 

Mr. R. Blinn Owen 
(Miss Dowd at the piano) 

5. Rigoletto Pantasie Verdi-Liszt 

Miss Nellie Philips 

6. (a) Hungarian Rhapsodie Hauser 

( 6 ) Adoration Borowski 

Miss Ada Parke 
(Mr. Owen at the piano) 

7. (a) Rhapsodie, G minor, Op. 79, No. 2 Brahms 

(b) Arabesque Debussy 

Miss Florence Hart 

Miss Dorroh played the popular Chopin Ballade with her usual 
ease and brilliancy and her appearance was greeted with marked favor. 
Mr. Owen, who is also well known to St. Mary's audiences, sang with 
dramatic fervor, "Where's My Boy ?" He responded to an enthusias- 
tic recall with the charming Scotch song, "My Laddie." 

The other performers were the new members of the Music Faculty. 
Miss Philips rendered the Liszt arrangement of Rigoletto with great 
brilliancy; Miss Hart's playing of the Brahms and DeBussy members 
was artistic and delightful ; Miss Graves gave a charming interpretation 
of MacDowell's fantastic and popular "Witches Dance." Miss 



16 . The St. Maey's Muse. 



Parke's rendition of both the violin and vocal numbers was thoroughly 
adequate. The concert was delightful throughout, and was enjoyed by 
a large and appreciative audience. 



Miss H^yward's Party 



The gayeties which are to take place in Senior Hall this year were 
begun on Wednesday night, October the second, by a Kimona party 
given from nine to ten, by Miss Heyward to the girls and teachers in 
the building. 

It was an ideal boarding school party — the Japanese lanterns cast- 
ing a dim light upon the girls seated around the room on cushions, 
waving "joss" sticks, drinking ginger ale, and eating sandwiches and 
salad. Afterwards they sang "Annie Laurie," "Suwanee River," etc., 
until the light's flashing called for the "goodnight, ladies," and regrets 
that such pleasant things have to end all too soon. 



The Wednesday Afternoon Reception 



It has been decided that the Faculty and Seniors of Saint Mary's will 
receive their friends in the parlor the first Wednesday in every month. 
The first of these receptions took place on Wednesday, October the 
second. Promptly at 4 :30 p. m. the Faculty and Seniors arrived in 
the parlor ready to receive their visitors. As the Seniors were to serve 
the refreshments to the guests, they first had to be initiated into the 
art of making tea, and then each one decided what was to be her par- 
ticular duty. Mrs. Lay received the guests at the door introducing 
them first to Miss Schenck and then in turn to each member of the 
new Faculty. As soon as the guests had entered they were served 
with tea and sandwiches by the Seniors. This was a very complicated 
matter, for to serve one person it took four Seniors — one to carry the 
tea, another for the sugar, another for the lemons and cream, and 
yet another to pass the sandwiches. At 5 :30 the big bell was rung 
and all the guests took this as a signal for departure. The reception 
seems to have been a decided success and was much i enjoyed by the 
Faculty, the Seniors, and it is hoped, by the guests. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



Sigma Lambda Reception 



On Saturday evening, October 6th, the old members of the Sigma 
Lambda Literary Society, gave a most delightful reception to the new 
members. The hall of East Wing and the Muse Room were artistically 
decorated with ferns, palms, cut flowers, pennants and banners. Upon 
arriving the guests were received by Misses Mary Butler, Caroline Jones, 
Jennie Woodruff, Amy Winston, Myrtle Warren and Mrs. Lay. They 
were then directed to the punch bowls over which presided Misses Susan 
Rawlings, Evelyn Maxwell, Fannie Cooper and Margaret McGary. A 
delicious salad course and ices were served by Misses Helen Patterson, 
Laura Clark, Dorothy Hopkins, Mildred Nottingham, Marguerite 
Blakely, Lois Pugh, Frances Strong, Tallulah de Rossett, and Myrtle 
Warren. 



School Gossip 



MARY BUTLER and LAURA M. HOPPE, Editors. 



Edith Clark's mother has just been to see her. 

Catherine Butt has had a short visit from her mother. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sherman have just made Virginia a short visit. 

Gertrude Brigham had the pleasure of having her mother here a few 
days last week. 

Lillie May Stevens, a last year's girl, has been here for a few days 
with Nellie Wood. 

Georgia Hales, '09, and Lorna Hales were visitors at the school 
during Fair Week. 

During the opening of school Ada French's mother was here, having 
brought her from Chicago. 

All the girls are expecting mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters and 
aunts during fair week. 

Mr. H. A. London, of Charlotte, was here for a. day the first of the 
month, with his daughter, Maie. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Erwin girls from Durham, have been down twice since school 
opened, in their new automobile. 

Susan Rawlings' sister, Sarah, spent a few days at St. Mary's on 
her way home from the mountains. 

Clara Wood and her mother were here for a few days at the open- 
ing. They brought Marion here to school. 

Millian Green, 1909-'10, was here for a few hours on October 9th. 
She came over from Durham in the Erwin's machine. 

Jennie Woodruff's sister, Eugenia, was a visitor during Fair Week, 
as was also Fannie McMullan, one of last year's Seniors. 

There have been several girls who have been fortunate enough to 
have visits from their mothers and fathers in the last week. Among 
them are: Margaret Thomas, Mary Bryan Griswold, Fannie Cooper, 
Lizzie Winston, Mary Smith, Mary Grant, Ruth Sedberry, Julia 
Bond and Florence Davis. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription. One Year = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies = x = = s Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumna?, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1912-1913. 

Caroline Clarke Jones, Editor-in-Chief. 

Julia Washington Allen, Mary Brown Butler, Laura Margaret Hoppb, 

Ellen Armistead Johnson, Susie McIver, Elise Gordon Stiles, 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry, Amy Conyers Winston. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, Business Manager. 

Myrtle Warren, Asst. Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL 



With this issue of the Muse the new editors take active charge and 
it is necessary to say a few important things at the start. We want to 
tell you all that without your help the Muse cannot accomplish what it 
aims to be, a good student paper. 

The Muse wishes to extend its heartiest welcome to the girls, old 
and new, and we hope that you will take as much interest and pride in 
i the Muse as the Muse takes interest and pride in you. 

Alumnse ! the Muse is primarily for you and you can help us not 
only by subscribing, but by sending us news of yourselves and friends 
i that you know will be of interest to the other Alumnse. 



Athletics, this year, have started off very promisingly, and now it 
is for us to keep up the enthusiasm. Girls, have enthusiasm not only 
in basketball or tennis because that is what you individually are inter- 
ested in ; but have enthusisasm in everything that Mus and Sigmas do. 



Each year as we return to St. Mary's in the fall we ask what have 
been the improvements during the summer. This year we were all 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



interested in seeing the new Muse Room. It has been changed from 
its old place in West Whig to the French Room in East Wing. It 
has been made into a very attractive room filled with pennants, pic- 
tures and pillows. The door to the Muse Room is always open; be- 
cause it is not only tk, be a place for the meetings of the Muse Club 
and Muse Board, but a general meeting place for all of the girls. 

There were many other improvements made during the summer. 
We old girls can hardly realize that the beautiful, newly papered rooms 
on the third floor Main Building, are Miss Sutton's old Dormitory. 
The new papering has made the greatest change. All of the rooms in. 
East and West Rock have beautiful new paper as have some of the 
second-floor Main Building rooms. They are all papered very prettily 
and make attractive and bright rooms. 



The Visits of the Rector 



The visits of the Rector to various meetings and conventions both in 
and out of the State are links that help connect St Mary's with the "out- 
side world," so we are sure it is of interest to give a short account of 
Mr. Lay's recent travels. 

In September, shortly before school opened, Mr. Lay was in Balti- 
more and the vicinity, on business connected with the Music Depart- 
ment ; October 9th and 10th he attended the convocation in Warrenton 
and left Raleigh on the day of his return, for the North, on another 
business trip. He was there until the 15th, which included a day spent 
with Miss Thomas and Miss Luney in their "Harlem flat," and a dinner 
cooked and served by them and pronounced faultless by their guest. He 
spent Sunday, the 13th, with relatives at St. Paul's School, Concord, 
New Hampshire. 

On October 20th, Mr. Lay was in Chapel Hill to deliver the first 
University sermon of the year. He had a second service that night, 
and Monday morning gave a short talk to the students in the College 
Chapel after Morning Prayers. On the 25th of October the Rector 
had prayers and a short address for the A. and M. students in West 
Raleigh. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernkst Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

tit. Mary's Alumnee Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

[Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - «j Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(,Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President .... Mrs. R. W. Winston, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

FinnRrrRPTiniN . - / Miss Anna N. Butxon, Winston-Salem. 

*ield Secretaries \ Miss Annie Root, Raleigh. 



The Traveliog Secretaries 



As most of the Alumnae know, at its last May meeting, the Alumnae 
Association appointed two of its members, Miss Anna Buxton, of Win- 
ston, and Miss Annie Root, of Raleigh, to act as "Field Secretaries" 
for the Association. Miss Root was given Eastern North Carolina, 
and Miss Buxton, Western Carolina, as their respective districts. 
Plans for their first trips have just been completed, and on October 
21st, both started out. 

On these first trips the route has naturally been planned to include 
the territory from which the greater part of St. Mary's girls come, and 
the two secretaries in their three weeks trip will reach a large part of 
the Carolina towns in which groups of Alumnse have their homes. If 
these trips prove successful, and there is every indication that they will 
prove so, it is expected at later dates to have the secretaries visit the 
more distant Alumnae towns and cities. 

The purpose of this trip of the secretaries is purely social. While 
the Alumnae individually show on many occasions their continued 
interest in the School and loyalty to it, the town groups — the Alumnae 
Chapters — have not held together as well or done as effective work in 
their influence for St. Mary's as they could and would if they were in 
closer touch with the School and with each other. It is hoped that Miss 
Buxton's and Miss Root's visits will arouse the latent interest to activity 
and in every way draw the members of the Alumnae more closely to- 
gether. 

The trips are made under the auspices of the Alumnae Council of the 
General Association, and local Alumnae in each town are arranging for 
the meetings and cooperating in every way. 

The itinerary of the trips is given below, though it will doubtless be 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 



somewhat modified. Following the return of the secretaries to Raleigh 
on November 9th, the fall meeting of the Raleigh Chapter will be held 
at St. Mary's on Monday November 11th, when the secretaries will give 
a general account of their trips. Following the Raleigh meeting it is 
hoped to have one of the secretaries visit Henderson, Oxford, and Little- 
ton, and with these visits the trip for 1912 will be complete. 

Itinerary of the Traveling Secretaries 

October 21, 1912. 

East. 

Monday, October 21st Wilson. 

Tuesday, October 22d Goldsboro. 

Wednesday, October 23d Kinston. 

Thursday, October 24th New Bern. 

Friday, October 25th Beaufort. 

Saturday, October 26th Washington. 

Monday, October 28th Edenton. 

Tuesday, October 29th Hertford. 

Wednesday, October 30th Elizabeth City. 

Friday, November 1st Norfolk-Portsmouth. 

Saturday, November 2d Tarboro. 

Monday, November 4th Enfield. 

Tuesday, November 5th Rocky Mount. 

Wednesday, November 6th Scotland Neck. 

Thursday, November 7th Wilmington. 

Friday, November 8th Fayetteville. 

West. 

Monday, October 21st Durham. 

Tuesday, October 22d Chapel Hill. 

Wednesday, October 23d Hillsboro. 

Thursday, October 24th Lexington. 

Friday, October 25th Salisbury- 
Saturday, October 26th Concord. 

Tuesday, October 29th Morganton. 

Wednesday, October 30th Hickory. 

Friday, November 1st Asheville. 

Monday, November 4th Charlotte. 

Tuesday, November 5th Monroe. 

Wednesday, November 6th Columbia. 

Thursday, November 7th Cheraw. 

Friday, November 8th Rockingham. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



ALUMNAE NEWS 



The Treasurer of the Alumnse Association wishes to announce the 
total of the funds on hand at this date, October 1st, as amounting to 
$372.31 in cash, and $2,000 worth of bonds. On the first of October, 
after receiving the quarterly interest, $2,000 of the sum then on hand, 
was converted into 6 per cent bonds, the interest of which is to be paid 
semi-annually, to Mrs. Iredell and Miss McKimmon as directed by 
the Association. The balance will remain in bank at 4 per cent com- 
pound interest. 

The members of the Alumna? Association will see from the above 
report that the sum of $2,000 has at last been raised, although much 
later than was promised at the May meeting. This means that in 5 
yeais slightly over one-third of the sum desired for the two scholarships 
has been raised. It is very far from being an achievement to be proud 
of, when we consider the number of the Alumnse, and the fact that 
the limit set was two years for the whole $6,000. Still, the fact that 
$1,000 of this sum has been raised in the last ten months is somewhat 
encouraging, as is also the fact that there seems to be a more united 
feeling of responsibility among the different Chapters, as to their 
part in raising this sum. What we would ask of all is that they bring 
their plans to a head as soon as possible, and let us try to let May, 
1913, see the completion of the entire fund. 

Early in the summer numbers of the younger Alumnse, those of 
the last ten years, received letters and pledge cards sent out from St. 
Mary's, asking their aid, particularly, in contributing to this scholar- 
ship sum. JSTo money was to be paid in then but pledges of from $1 
to $10 were asked for, with the understanding that they were only to be 
redeemed if they amounted to as much as $1,000. These same letters 
also asked for information as to girls who were ready for St. Mary's, 
and who through relatives or friends should be interested in St. Mary's. 

The responses to these letters have been fewer than was expected, 
and the sum still far from the goal, yet the spirit of the replies that 
have come in has been very gratifying. Numbers of the letters, be- 
sides the pledges, have shown the interest and loyalty of the writers, 
which counts more than anything else. 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ALUMNAE NOTES 



Among the visitors at the opening of the school on September 19th, 
were Miss Hallie Carrison, of Camden, S. C. ; Miss Louise Badham, of 
Edenton, and Miss Jessie P. Harris, of Henderson, who were here to 
enter their sisters. 

Mrs. H. G. Cooper, of Oxford, spent a few hours at St. Mary's on 
the 19th. 



ALUMNAE WEDDINGS 



Spencer — Mann 
On July 6th, Lucy Gertrude Mann and Carroll B. Spencer were 
married in Middletown, 1ST. C, at St. George's Episcopal Church. 



Smith— Hanger 
The marriage of Elizabeth Smith, of Goldsboro, and McCarthy 
Hanger, of Washington, took place in St. Paul's Methodist Church, 
Goldsboro, on July 20th. 



Gilliam — Philips 

Mrs. Frederick Philips 

has the honour of 

announcing the marriage of her daughter 

Leila Burt 

to 

Mr. James Daniel Gilliam 

on Saturday, the seventh of September 

One thousand nine hundred and twelve 

at Tarborough, North Carolina 

Mr. and Mrs. James Daniel Gilliam 
Will be at home 
after the twentieth of September 
Saint Ermius Hotel 
Saint James' Park 
London, England 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

Lyon — Mardre 

Mr. and Mrs. George Lewis Mardre 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Mary Ruth 

to 

Mr. Charles Franklin Lyon 

on Wednesday morning, the ninth of October 

at eight o'clock 

Saint Thomas' Church 

Windsor, North Carolina 



James — Clark. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Samuel Clark 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Isabel Hamilton 

to 

Mr. John Haughton James 

on Wednesday, the twenty-third of October 

at eight o'clock 

at Calvary Church 

Tarborough, North Carolina 



Allison — Montague 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Franklin Montague 

request the honor of your presence at 

the marriage of their daughter 

May Lee 

to 

Mr. James Cumming Allison 

on the evening of Wednesday the sixth of November 

nineteen hundred and twelve 

at nine o'clock 

First Presbyterian Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



READ !— M ARK. !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Ready to- Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls. 




Fayetteville 
Street 



^£vcaax&& 




»• Exclusive 



% Millinery 



'The new girls are awfully fresh this year!" 

I heard an old girl say; 
'They can tell you when and where or why 



Just any time of day." 




THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 






Dry Goods 


"It's worth the difference " 




OF ALL KINDS 


THE TYREE STUDIO 




MILLINERY 








Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 


" Workers in Artistic Photography 


" 


LADIES' FINE SHOES «TO SLIPPERS 






1 







Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N C. 

Established 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 

COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

WE SELL GOSSARD'S LACE 

FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



Suppose we had no holidays, 
Would life seem half so dear? 

Then don't complain of school days, 
For Monday'll soon be here. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

The 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Advertisements. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 



Good Things Always at 



BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 



124 Fayetteville Street 



Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
118 E. Davie Street Raleigh, N. C. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 



CHAS. E. JOHNSON, 

President. 
G. H. DORTCH, 
Secretary. 



A. A. THOMPSON, 
Treasurer. 

R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 



210 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



Oh, me! I'll never make it, 
That bell rings awful soon; 

So the sleepy girl turns over 
And forgets the world till noon. 



. ROSENTHAL 
JCO. 

GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



Edwards & Broughton 



Printing "[Co.! | f 9 



^[Specialty of 



. .... " " ~ '<-^&&m 

32J3l. School Workfand 

H £l Social! Stationery 

RALEIGH, IN, C. 



Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones 



'{ 



174 
226 



COLLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Special 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 

Coat Suits, School Dresses, Evening- Costumes, Waists, Coats, and Accessory Lines 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trimming's, Gloves, Hosiery, Laces, Notions, Etc. 



McKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. 



Fayetteville St. 



C. E. HARTGE 



Architect 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds oi Keys Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 



"Why, who are all those frightened girls," 
Asked one that was quite new, 

"Who stand aside for us so meek, 
As if it were our due?" 

II. 
"Oh, those? they are our Seniors," 

An old girl did reply; 
"They do not dare to block the way 

When new girls pass them by." 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 

HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 

Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
The "Wake Drug- Store. Phones 228 

HICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE Phones 107 

Prompt Delivery 

Jolly &- Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINEBT 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 

BRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 



DARNELL & THOMAS 



MUSIC HOUSE 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
10 W. Hargett Street Phone 619 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 
222 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 

WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 COR. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 



Hey diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle, 

The Fair will soon be here, 
And then we'll have all sorts of fun, 

Oh, new girls! never fear! 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



w. W. CROXTON, 

Traffic Manager, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. TJPCHURCH, 

General Agrent, RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Rosea, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C- Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who ia now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th StP., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 
Picture Frames and Window Shades 

perry's art store 

S. Wilmington Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAYING BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALENDAR 



September — October. 

September 19, Thursday. Opening of School. 

September 21, Saturday. Old girls reception to the new, given in the Muse Room. 

September 28, Saturday. Baby Party, given by the Muse Club. 

September 30, Monday. First Faculty Recital. 

October 1, Tuesday. Roosevelt in the Auditorium. 

October 2, Wednesday. Reception by Faculty in the afternoon in the Parlor. 

October 5, Saturday. Sigma Lambda Reception. A. and M. — Franklin Football. 

Game. 
October 12, Saturday. E. A. P. Reception. 
October 16, 17. Fair Holiday. 
October 19, Saturday. Alpha Rho Reception. 
October 26, Saturday. Carnival. 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

All Our Work Done by The Goodyear Welt System 
104 E. Harg-ett Street 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury Street 



IT HE WAU GAU RAC: Official Orgran 
A. <fc M. Athletic Association. $1.50 Per 

Year. Walter C. Taylor, Bus. Mgr. 

West Raleigh, N. C. 



MRS. FRANK REDFORD 

13 W. HargettSt. STYLISH MILLINERY 



BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST DRY GOOD STORE 

Come and See Us in Our New Home 

Everything- for Woman's Wear. Ready-to-Wear Garments of all Kinds 



L ocation Central for th e Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and S alu brious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 
71st ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 19, 1912. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 1913. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE, 
St. Mary's \ 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these < 8. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

J 4. THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium* Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to tlie Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



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t Mzxf* Mmt 



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The St. Mary's Muse. 

AUTUMN NUMBER 
Vol. XVrX November, 1912. No. 2 

November 



Floba Lewis. 
Yes, through some fairy's mystic spell, 
The colors of the rainbow fell, 
And painted the leaves that nestled still 
On the sun-kissed peak of yonder hill, 
And the crystal frost in the early dawn 
Spread a sheen of silver over the lawn, 
In November. 

And when these days draw to a close, 
Like a beautiful, satiny, faded rose, 
As the sun sinks down in the opal west, 
These golden days we love the best, 
And the skies overhead are a brighter blue, 
And friends we love are always true, 
In November. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



LAURA MARGARET HOPPE and MARY BROWN BUTLER, Editors 



Saint Louans 

(A Travel Sketch) 



Mary Frances Pender. 

On the summit of a little hill near Chinon, in France, stands a most 
imposing, cold, grey, stone building which from a distance looks as 
though it might be a state prison. It is the convent of St. Louans. It 
is surrounded by a garden, and on either side of the long lane leading 
to the entrance is a majestic row of linden trees. 

At the gate is the chapel. Such a dear little chapel ! On the front 



26 The St. Maky's Muse. 



is an ancient frieze representing St. Louans healing the sick. The sis- 
ters, in showing you around always take you to the chapel first. They 
love to point out the merits of each saint as you pass their statues on 
your way to the miraculous tomb of St. Louans, which is at one end of 
the chapel. You have to go down a dark winding stair into a vault 
below the chapel. How they delight to tell of all the miracles he 
worked ! They even tell marvelous tales about the miracles he has per- 
formed since his death. 

They also love to take you around the enclosure and point out the 
ruins of the chateau of Chinon and tell you the story of Jeanne d' Arc, 
and show you the very tower where she had her first interview with 
Charles VII. The sisters will show you the little town of Chinon 
that lies at the foot of the hill, pointing out the things of interest, 
although they have never seen them, for they are cloistered nuns and 
never go outside of the convent walls. 

Let us take, for instance, Sister Bernadette. She is very pretty 
and attractive and every one loves her. She was raised in a convent and 
knows no other life. She only knows that this is a life of sacrifice, a 
"pilgrimage of tears." Now the trouble with Sister Bernadette, as is 
the case with many other sisters, is that she was too affectionate, and 
was taught that human affection is sinful. 

There is very little in Sister Bernadette's little world except work 
and prayer ; and there is not much appreciation for that. But one time 
there came to stay in the convent, a charming Parisian lady, with won- 
derfully fascinating eyes. Now these two grew very fond of each other 
and Sister Bernadette stayed with Madame de Paris all of her spare 
time. Finally the Mother told the lady that she had a bad influence 
over Sister Bernadette and must therefore leave the convent. 

In this way are friends separated and the thing they love most taken 
away. And yet they never complain but merely say, "Such is the will 
of God." 

Cruel and harsh as their lives may seem, nowhere else have I seen 
such perfect faith, and such charity to all men, of all classes. It does 
not matter what denomination a man may be if he is injured or in 
trouble they are charitable, tender and kind. Nowhere have I found 
such lovely characters as within those convent walls. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 2T 

Saturday Evening at St. Mary's 

(An Every-day Sketch) 



Susan Porteb Rawlings. 

It is Saturday evening, chapel is over, choir practice is over, and a 
frantic crowd of girls is rushing and tumbling down the main building 
steps. It is a true case of knock-down and carry out. What is the 
matter, wonders the outsider, is the building a-fire ? No, no, the girls 
are merely going for their mail. East Rock is in pandemonium for a 
few minutes and then the rush is over. Groups of girls go into the par- 
lor, some reading their beloved letters, some reading the beloved letters 
of their friends, and the most unfortunate ones reading nothing, for 
neither they nor their friends have any mail. 

But they do not care, for it is Saturday night and the rugs in the 
parlor are rolled up, and the lights are on, and we are going to dance. 
"Give me the next dance, Mary," comes the cry from the doorway. 

"You may have the fifth," is the answer. "I am sweet popularity 
tonight." 

"Oh, my!" the damsel of the doorway responds. 

"Oh W , do lead a figure, won't you please, and I'll get some one 

to play; here J , please play just one, we want to have a figure 

that's right." 

"All right," W answers, "come on K and help me ; we will 

do the maltose cross." 

And so we start. Of course the girls refuse to stand straight and the 
cross becomes a little disfigured, but at the end that wild burst of 
applause is just as genuine, as if it had been perfect. 

"Fine, fine," is the cry from all parts of the room, except from behind 
the piano in the far corner, where "mashes" are carefully encircled in 
each others' arms. How sorry we feel for "mashes" on those glorious 
dancing Saturday nights. They can not dance, they can only love. 

And now it is eight o'clock and the suitors are beginning to come. 
Oh, those poor girls who have suitors and have to entertain them in 
hard schoolroom desks ! The crowd in the parlor is thinner now, but 
we are still hilarious. At nine a sadness prevails in the schoolroom ; the 



28 The St. Maky's Muse. 

suitors are leaving. But the sadness does not last long, because we must 
have a good time that last half hour. The crowd reassembles and danc- 
ing begins afresh, until there is mingled in the harmonies of a dreamy- 
waltz, the clang, clang of the "big bell," and a wail of anguish rends 
the air. We dance a last few steps to "Home Sweet Home" and good- 
nights are said. 

Our Saturday night, fun is ended. 



Wanted— An Angel 



Evelyn Cameron Maxwell. 

Bobby had never been to Sunday School before, and as the children 
scampered past him, and out into the sunshine, he thought things over. 
It was a mighty queer thing. He guessed mother had not ever been — 
for she had not told him to do the things that the Sunday School lady 
said were his duty. What was a duty anyhow ? Bobby did not quite 
know, but he was pretty sure it was not the kind of thing a fellow 
would want. Why did he have to have one ? Then a great light 
dawned on him ! Most of the things the lady had told him were a 
mere jumble of words, but one thing was clear. A duty was what she 
had been talking about when she said, "It's better to give than to re- 
ceive." He would just find out what his was and give it to Billy 
Tucker at the earliest opportunity. 

For the present, however, he was still the possessor of that unknown 
quality and the lady was mighty pretty, and anyhow he'd "truly 
promised." 

But what should he do to be a "Sunday School" good-boy ? He was 
sure it was very different from the kind of good-boy his mother taught 
him to be. Bobby frowned darkly at the surrounding landscape and 
tried to decide. Suddenly a brilliant thought struck him and his little 
face fairly beamed. What was this little card for, if not to help him 
be good ? He scrutinized it closely. The picture was "awful pretty" 
but the words were so big. He sat down on the curbing and bent his 
curly head above the card. He just could not read it. The brown eyes 



The St. Mary's Muse, 29 



filled with tears, and Bobby looked quickly around to see if any one was 
near enough to see the big lump that he knew was making his throat 
stick out. 

Well, goody ! there was Uncle Tom ! Bobby trotted to meet his big 
uncle as fast as the short legs could go. 

"Why, Bobs, what are you doing way off here ?" 

"Sunny School," panted Bobby importantly. "Reckon you could 
read this for me ?" 

"Be not forgetful to entertain strangers, for thereby some have 
entertained angels unawares," read Uncle Tom from the card. "Bet- 
ter run along home Bobs." 

But "Bobs" stood perfectly still — his small face shining with much 
the same expression that must have lighted that of Jeanne d' Arc when 
she saw the great vision. He guessed that after he'd entertained one 
or two "angels unawares," Botty Brown would play with him 'stead of 
Billy Tucker. Just wouldn't people point him out and say, "There's 
the little boy who entertains 'angels . unawares' !" He heard steps 
behind him and turned eagerly. It was Pete, the sexton. Bobby liked 
Pete, but he felt sure he was no "angel unaware," so he went on his 
way with the air of owning Huntsville. 

There was a stranger ! He was a mighty black one to be an angel — 
but then "angel s-unawares" were different from angels. Bobby did 
not know in just what way they were different, but it might be the 
color. He marched boldly up to the little negro, who, arrayed in all 
the glory of his Sunday best, was coming his way. 

Won't you please come to my house with me, and let me entertain 
you some ?" begged Bobby. 

The little negro rolled his eyes in wonder. 

"Huh ?" 

"I say," said Bobby impatiently, "if you'll come home with me I'll 
'say my piece' for you and give you an apple." 

"Come on! Le's hurry!" The darkey's face was covered by one 
huge grin. Apples did not come his way every day. 

Once at Bobby's home Eph — that was the "angel's" name — was en- 
throned in a large chair of brocade and gilt, against which he resem- 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 



bled a large lump of coal. Before him stood Bobby, swaying back and 
forth reciting in a sing-song voice 

"Kind hearts are the gardens, 
Kind thoughts are the seeds." 

That was the way his mother made him entertain all the ladies who 
called. But somehow it did not seem to satisfy the "angel unaware." 
Well, he would try the apple. 

Off he trotted, and returned with a large red apple. The angel 
again became enveloped in his wonderful smile which glory was soon 
buried in the side of the apple. 

Bobby sat on the floor and watched His Holiness feast. It was 
then that he first felt any misgivings as to whether he was a Holiness 
after all — or only an ordinary negro. But that was impossible, for 
the card had said he would be an "angel-unawares." Maybe an "angel- 
unawares" always ate like that, and pulled off the peelin's with their 
teeth and threw 'em on the floor. But that was mother's beautifulest 
carpet, and it seemed a mighty queer way to do. 

The apple was finished and the core followed the peelings. 

"Got any mo' ?" 

Bobby sadly shook his curls. He thought maybe he had better ask 
this queer person just what kind of angel he was anyhow. 

"Please, sir, are yau an 'angel-unawares' or jus' a plain angel ?" 

His guest regarded him with utmost contempt as he slid down from 
the big chair. 

"Ain't no kind er angel. I'm Ephram Lincoln Lee, and ef yer ain't 
got no mo' apples, I'm a-goin. Bye !" 

The door slammed on Bobby's visitor, and his feelings as well. Then 
the beautiful Sunday School lady must have told him stories! And 
the card had told him stories ! And he wouldn't have one of those 
kind of angels to show Botty Brown ! He was too disappointed to cry. 
If mother had not been at church he could have asked her about it, but 
she was at church. He wandered from room to room and thought over 
his troubles. Angels-unawares indeed ! He bet there were no such 
things ! Ephram Lincoln Lee ! Did that sound much like an angel's 
name ? No, but it did sound like a name he had heard before ! At 
least Eph Lee was quite a familiar name ! Wasn't he the washerwo- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 

man's boy ? And hadn't they played together once about two years 
ago, when Bobby was three ? Yes they had ! So he wasn't a stranger 
at all — and that's why he couldn't be an "angel-unaware" ! Bobby 
laughed with delight. The Sunday School lady hadn't told him a 
story and he could still find his angel-unaware — only this time he 
might get mother to help him. The thought of mother brought thoughts 
of the carpet and Bobby ran off to find Sarah to come clean up the rem- 
nants of Mr. Ephram Lincoln Lee's feast before church was out. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



ELLEN ARMISTEAD JOHNSON and ELIZABETH ANDERSON TARRY, Editors 



October II— Senior-Sophomore Party 



The thirteen Seniors of 1913 entertained their sister class on Senior 
Day, Friday, October the eleventh, with a Kimona Party in the Muse 
Room. The class colors were faithfully represented in every detail 
of the decorations. Each of the Seniors wore a purple kimona, the 
colors blending with the decorations, and making an effective setting 
for the merry scene. Light refreshments were served, and the hour 
was spent in a delightfully informal way, with games and merriment. 



October 12— The E. A. P. Reception 



On Saturday night, October 12th, the annual reception of the Epsi- 
lon Alpha Pi Literary Society was held in the Muse Room. 

The invited guests, the new members of the Society, the Faculty, 
and the officers of the Sigma Lambda and the Alpha Rho Societies, 
were welcomed at the door by Miss White, president of the Society, 
Misses Peoples, Stiles, Hoppe and Mclver. 

A delicious salad course was served, each plate containing an orange 
case filled with salad, on a lettuce leaf, several beaten biscuits, cheese 
straws and olives. This was followed by an orange ice and small 
cakes in which the colors of the society, olive and gold, were attract- 



32 The St. Mary's Muse. 



ively carried out, and lastly, as favors, small green baskets tied with 
yellow ribbon and containing yellow mints, were presented to each 
guest. 

During the evening fruit punch was served from vine-covered bowls, 
by Misses Rogers, Lassiter, J. Rees and Cleaton. 

The room never looked more attractive than it did on this occasion, 
with E. A. P. peunants and banners on the walls, potted plants here 
and there on the tables, and huge bowls of golden rod effectively placed 
in front of banks of green leaves, which harmonized beautifully with 
the green and gold of the pennants. The evening was a most delight- 
ful one in every way. 



October 16 and 17— The pair 



The first great event to St. Mary's girls after the opening of school 
is the fair. The great State Fair came earlier than usual this year, 
commencing the fourteenth of October and going through the nine- 
teenth. We had holiday the sixteenth and seventeen. At twelve 
thirty Wednesday, the sixteenth, we all assembled in front of Main 
Building and started out in small groups "to take in the fair." The 
fair grounds were crowded, but being school girls we all reveled in the 
crowd. We all had our fortunes told and expect now "to live happily 
ever afterward." We saw "Lulu the smallest horse in the world," the 
fair grounds were crowded, but being school girls we all reveled in the 
fullest we all went and got fried oysters and chicken salad and with a 
final ride on the merry-go-round, we started home tired but happy. 

Those who were fortunate enough to have parents here went to the 
fair on Thursday, but the majority of us stayed here and ended our 
holiday by going to the Georgetown-A. and M. football game. 



October 19— Alpha Rho Reception 



Saturday evening, October 19, the Alpha Rho Literary Society held 
its first reception, given to their members, the Faculty and the officers 
of the Sigma Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi societies. 



The St. Mary's Mtjse. 33 

The officers of the Alpha Rho Society, Misses Woodruff, Tarry, 
Rawlings, Clark, Graves, Meggs and Williams, Mrs. Lay, Miss 
Schenck, and Miss Shattuck composed the receiving line that stood 
just inside the Muse Room which was beautifully decorated in autumn 
leaves, potted plants and banners in crimson and gray, colors of the 
Alpha Rho. There fruit punch was served from a most attractively 
decorated table by Misses Campbell and Parker. 

The hall, artistically decorated with potted plants and cut flowers, 
was most inviting with its numerous broad, pillow-heaped seats and 
cozy corners. Here a second punch table was presided over by Misses 
Virginia Davis and Beth Thomas. 

Misses Gold, Overman, Hodgson, Willis, Geitner and Allen served 
delightful refreshments in two courses, the color scheme being effect- 
ively carried out. It was with regret that the nine-thirty bell was 
heard as a signal to end an evening that was thoroughly enjoyed by all. 



October 23— To the Seniors 



On Wednesday, October 23, Mr. and Mrs. Lay entertained the Sen- 
ior Class and sub-faculty with a most delightful afternoon tea. The 
girls, upon arriving at the Rectory at five o'clock, were cordially wel- 
comed by their host and hostess, and then seated in the homelike par- 
lor, where Mrs. Lay presided over the punch bowl and Miss Ellen Lay 
passed delicious pimento and fig sandwiches and divinity candy. 
Every one was very sorry when the six o'clock bell rang and school 
duties had to be resumed. 

Among those present were Misses Caroline Jones, Amy Winston, 
Jennie Woodruff, Rebecca Kyle, Mary Butler, Bessie White, Evelyn 
Maxwell, Elizabeth Cherry, Lina Lockhart, Susan Rawlings, Ellen 
Johnson. 



October 26— The Carnival 



On the evening of Saturday, October 26, 1912, the students of St. 
Mary's were given a carnival, in the Gymnasium, under the auspices 
of the Muse Club. 
2 



34 The St. Mary's Muse, 

Entering the gym. we encountered a scene of unsual festivity, "booths 
in front of us, booths to the right of us, booths to the left of us," where 
one might, for a few cents, see such wonders as the fat lady, imperson- 
ated by Camelia London, the Siamese twins, impersonated by the well 
known "little men" Edith and Edna ; the American fleet sailing 
around the world, the famous swimming match, and lastly the red bat. 
Jennie Woodruff, who was in charge of the side shows, made an excel- 
lent manager, and one can safely say they were the greatest success of 
the evening. 

Another feature, and perhaps the best, was the fortune teller. 
Dressed as a gypsy, Josephine Wilson told fortunes and read palms, 
and I venture to say, there were few girls who went to the Carnival 
and left without having their future laid out before them. 

There were five booths, the first being presided over by Evelyn 
Maxwell, L. M. Hoppe, Bessie White, and Susanne Busbee, was deco- 
rated in blue and white. At this booth one could buy Dutch salad — ' 
even if she were not Dutch. 

Next to attract our attention was the sandwich booth, where sand- 
wiches were served by Helen Peoples, Mary Butler and Susan Rawl- 
ings, from an attractively decorated rustic arbor, over which trailed 
green vines intermingled with brilliant red autumn leaves, adding much 
to the beauty of the scene. 

Turning from the sandwich booth we found ourselves before a 
punch well, where, for five cents, one could be refreshed with Itwo 
glasses of punch. Susie Mclver and Julia Allen presided at this 
booth which was white with green vines. 

By the side of the punch well was the attractive candy booth, made 
up in red and white, the posts of which looked like immense sticks of 
candy. Here Elsie Stiles, Ellen Johnson and Elizabeth Tarry sold 
candy so rapidly that the supply of sweets was soon exhausted. 

Going from the last mentioned booth, we came to a screened space, 
which upon closer inspection was found to be the ice cream parlor, 
where Amy Winston, Sally Heywood, Laura Clark and Caroline 
Jones sold chocolate and vanilla ice cream. 

The last booth to be visited was the one where fruit was sold by Myr- 
tle Warren and Jennie Woodruff. This booth looked attractive in 



The St. Mary's Muse. 35 

white and yellow decorations with rosy apples, bananas and pears 
strung around the enclosure. 

After the many good things had almost disappeared, we spent the 
rest of the time in dancing, music being furnished by Miss Sutton, 
also some selections were given on the victrola by Mr. Owen. 



October 28— Pre-hjallowe'en Party 



We were all astonished when asked to come in work dress to the 
party given by Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank in honor of Miss Kate Smith, 
and gathered expectantly in front of their parlor door, at four o'clock 
sharp, on Monday the twenty-eighth of October. Imagine if you can 
our astonishment when we saw the floor of the delightfully decorated 
room covered with a huge sheet, on which were spread card-board, scis- 
sors, paste-pot and roll after roll of Hallowe'en crepe paper. 

After exclaiming over the festoons of owls, black cats and witches 
we settled ourselves on the floor and began to cut figures from the crepe 
paper and paste them on the card-board. While we worked with the 
fascinating scissors and paste brushes, making as we found, decora- 
tion for the gymnasium on Hallowe'en, Mrs. Cruikshank made choc- 
olate candy and toasted marshmallows for us. While the candy was 
cooling Mr. Cruikshank popped corn and we were as fascinated as lit- 
tle children while watching the grains swell and explode. 

At supper that night we excited the envy and curiosity of the other 
girls in school by telling them of what a very, very delightful time we 
had had, and by absolutely refusing to tell what we had done with paste 
pot and scissors, which, of course, were quite casually mentioned. 



October 29— The Circus 



All day Tuesday, October 29th, the girls were in the greatest state 
of excitement, for at eleven o'clock the parade of Ringling's circus 
passed by, and then best of all, school closed at one o'clock so we could 
go to the circus at two. This was the biggest treat we've had this year. 



36 The St. Mary's Muse. 

What could have been more fun than riding out to the fair grounds in 
a crowded car seeing for the first time, the white tops of the tents ? 
Then joy of all joys, going into the "Big Show," seeing all the queer 
animals, buying pop-corn and lemonade, and watching Joan of Arc 
meet her king. Then came the trick-horses, the trapeze acting, tight 
rope walking, trained seals, and all the things that we find in "the big- 
gest circus in the world," which has three rings going at the same time. 
After seeing all these wonders, the St. Mary's girls straggled home, 
but having had the "time of their lives." 



October 31— Hallowe'en 



All day mysterious meetings and exchanged glances had been going 
on, and nearly every girl, at three fifteen, was busily engaged in fixing 
up her masquerade costume ; for Hallowe'en had come again and each 
girl was to masquerade as some character. All afternoon girls worked 
busily fixing the "gym." up in Hallowe'en array, and promptly at , 
7 :45 the ghosts and others began to trip into the old dining room to 
form ranks for the grand march, which Miss Sutton had aready begun 
to play. 

Indian squaws and chiefs mingled graciously with colonial dames, 
who cast many a coy glance at the stately forms of colonial men. 
"Polly of the Circus" and "Sunny Jim," "The Gold Dust Twins," 
"Night," "The Suffragette," full of enthusiasm, and the "Queen of 
Hearts," dainty little fairies, who seemed straight from fairy land, 
flitted here and there, the little clowns, full of fun, bashful beaux and 
sweet Janis Meredith, the wandering gypsy maid, and the gunning 
girl, who had come forth armed, to try to capture a few more hearts, 
and then our Lady Principal — each girl rubbed her eyes and wondered 
what she had to make her see double ! her double she certainly was see- 
ing! one girl clutched an arm of her friend's and said, "Come on girlie, 
I guess I'm not well." 

But they were making the "rounds" again and they both seemed to 
be Miss Schenck ! Quarreling, good naturedly over who was who, and 
speculating over Miss Schenck, we filed through "The Maze" at the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 37 

end of which our futures awaited us. And how often they "hit the 
mark." 

Then unmasking time came, and surprised we looked into each oth- 
ers' faces and laughed. The Muse Club disguised as ghosts, handed 
around the refreshments, while the gay party "tripped the light fantas- 
tic toe" to the tune of old-fashioned music. 

Then some of us drew aside to fish for little souvenirs, with tiny 
fishing rods, or take a peep into the minature well for a glimpse of our 
"love to be." 

All too soon the big bell rang and blithely each girl tripped up the 
stairs to her own little room. Happy but "awfully" tired. 



November 1— All Saints' Day 



With the rising bell on All Saints' Day, the first thought that came 
to me was, "Oh, a holiday, how glorious!" But suddenly I remem- 
bered an article which I had recently read on the origin of the day. 
It mentioned that the early Indians observed what was called "Indian 
Summer" which is sometimes spoken of now as the "Summer of All 
Saints" ; the most important day of this season of theirs, coinciding with 
our All Saints' Day. It was then I realized that the greater part of 
the day would be spent in commemorating the memory of the uncalen- 
dared Saints, particularly of those who have been dear to us. 

Later in the day, this was impressed on my mind by the processional 
hymn, "Hark the Sound of Holy Voices," that the girls sang as they 
marched into Chapel, which was beautifully decorated with autumn 
flowers. 

In the afternoon a meeting of the Literary Societies was held in the 
parlor, which recalled to the girls, by the narration of the lives of the 
former Rectors, that this day was also Founders' Day. 

At the close of this All Saints' Festival while "Fades o'er the Moor 
the brief ISTovember day," we all meditated upon the impressive fact 
that this festival grows richer each year with fresh harvestings to the 
garner of God. 



38 The St. Mary's Muse. 



November 2— For the Juniors 



Miss Urquhart, the Junior Class adviser, entertained the Juniors at 
a most delightful party in the Muse Room from 9 to 9 :30 p. m. It 
was an evening such as we all enjoy, it being very informal. Deli- 
cious ice cream and cakes were served by the hostess and Susan Rawl- 
ings, and every one was very sorry when the 9 :30 bell broke up the 
merry crowd. 



November 7— Thursday TalK 



After dinner, on Thursday, November 7, Mr. Lay gave a very 
enjoyable talk to the assembled students, on the relation of physics 
to music. He illustrated the important points by means of a stringed 
instrument and a cornet, playing taps, much to the delight of the 
girls. 



November 11— Second Faculty Recital 

On Monday, November 11, a concert was given by Miss Caroline 
T. McCobb and Miss Ethel I. Rowand, assisted by Miss Florence Hart, 
Pianist, and Mr. R. Blinn Owen, accompanist. The programme was 
greatly appreciated by the student body and visitors, as was shown by 
the hearty applause and many beautiful flowers which the performers 
received. 

Programme 

1. (a) Si Mes Vers Avaient des Ailes Hahn 

(b) I Know a Little Garden Path Foote 

( c) In the Dark Daniels 

Miss Rowand 

2. Aria from "Madam Butterfly" Puccini 

Miss McCobb 

3. Etude in D flat Liszt 

Miss Hart 

4. Aria from "Herodiade" Massenet 

Miss Rowand 



The St. Mary's Muse. 39 

5. (a) April Rain Schreider 

(b) Land of the Sky-blue Water Cadman 

(c) Boat Song Ware 

Miss McCobb 

6. Passage Birds' Farewell Hildach 

Miss Rowand and Miss McCobb 



lovember 12— Literary Society Debates 



Spirited debates were held in both the Sigma Lambda and B. A. P. 
societies on the evening of the twelfth of November. In the former 
society, the subject was, "Resolved, That temper is an element of 
strength rather than weakness of character," the affirmative being 
supported by Melba McCullers and Kate Elliot, while on the negative 
side were Margaret Thomas and Evelyn Maxwell. The decision of 
the judges was in favor of the negative. 

In the Epsilon Alpha Pi, Julia Allen and Julia Cooper, upholding 
the affirmative, won against Elizabeth Waring and Pencie Warren in 
the question, "Resolved, That woman's suffrage is desirable." 



November 13 — The Senior Class to the Faculty 



From five to six o'clock Wednesday afternoon, November thirteenth, 
the Seniors were a At Home" to the Faculty, in the Muse Room. The 
room looked very cosy and attractive ; the tea and sandwiches served 
were delicious, and the Seniors proved themselves very gracious 
hostesses. 



November 14 — Pupils' Recital and Mr. rianford 



The usual Thursday afternoon recital was held at 4:45, November 
14th, in the Auditorium. After the recital was over Mr. Charles B. 
Hanford, Shakespearian actor, spoke informally to the girls. Sixty 
girls were to go that night to see Mr. Hanford in Othello, so he very 
kindly gave an outline of the play, and also gave several selections 
from other plays of Shakespeare. The talk was greatly enjoyed, and 



40 The St. Mary's Muse. 

that evening Othello was much more appreciated on account of Mr. 
Hanforcl's explanation of the afternoon. 
The program of the recital is given below : 

1. Papillons Noirs Massenet 

E. Tarry 

2. Tune of May Salter 

P. Gallup 

3. Ghost Schytte 

F. King 

4. Light Bauer 

M. Wright 

5. Nocturne Field 

M. Floyd 

6. Auhade Chaminade 

A. Webb 

7. Slumber Song Gurlitt 

Mary Hoke 



November 14 — Thursday Talk. 



Miss Mary Shannon Smith, of Meredith College, spoke to the girls 
on the evening of November 14th, on "What a girl is to do when she 
leaves school." She spoke of the fact that a very large number of her 
audience would probably marry, but they probably did not think of 
what they should put into the home. They would give the atmosphere 
to the home, and it was a very important thing to think of what sort 
of atmosphere they could give. She also spoke of the many vocations 
open now to women beside teaching, and of the fact that now was the 
time to look toward a decision. 



SCHOOL GOSSIP 



MYRTLE WARREN and ELISE GORDON STILES, Editors 



Mary Lamb, 1911-'12, was here several days ago. 
Sadie Williams, a last year's girl, was here a few days with Kath- 
arine Lassiter. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 41 

Mary Bourne and Rosalie Bernhardt made visits to St. Mary's the 
latter part of October. 

Alice Harris, 1911-'12, was in Raleigh a short time ago, and 
was at St. Mary's for a little visit. 

A visit from Kate Smith, who was on her way to New York to 
school, was greatly enjoyed by the old girls. 

The old girls have especially enjoyed the occasional visits of Eliz- 
abeth Hughes, who graduated last year. 

Agnes Reese, Gertrude Brigham and Beth Thomas enjoyed short 
visits from their mothers the first of the month. 

Katharine B. Lassiter, a last year's girl, who has been visiting Eliz- 
abeth Hughes in the city, came out here a few days ago. 

Miss Buxton, Traveling Secretary in Western Carolina for the 
Alumnae, was at St. Mary's a few days, the first of the month. 

Amelia Sturgeon an old girl and last year a member of the sub-Fac- 
ulty, spent a few days in Raleigh last week and was at St. Mary's sev- 
eral times. 

We are very sorry that it was necessary for Ada French and Ellen 
Sherrerd to go home on account of their health, and hope that both 
will be able to return soon. 

Dorothy Budge's father, mother and two sisters spent a night in 
Raleigh on their way from Rhode Island to Miami, Florida, coming 
all the way by automobile. 

Lieutenant and Mrs. Derward Wilson (Olive Morrell), of Fort Mc- 
Pherson, and Mrs. Morrell, were welcome visitors on November 2d. 
Mrs. Wilson was at St. Mary's in 1904, and her mother, Mrs. Morrell 
(Janie Brown) was a St. Mary girl of the 80's. 



Faculty Notes 



Mr. Lay was in High Point, October 29th, attending a meeting of 
the Association for Prevention of Tuberculosis, and made an address 
while there on "Ventilation, and the Good and Bad Effects of Solar 
Rays." 



42 The St. Mary's Muse. 



On November 14th, Mr. Lay was in Spartanburg to attend the meet- 
ing of the Association of Southern Colleges and Schools. 

Miss Ricks spent November 9-12 at home, to be present at the wed- 
ding of her sister. 

Miss Fenner went to Martinsburg, West Virginia, on the 16th of 
November, to travel back with her aunt, Miss Gerber, who is to live 
in Raleigh the rest of this year. 



Alice in Letter Land 



Alice, dressed in white PK, 

Strolled out after T; 
Felt she owned the U. S. A.! 

All the kids cried "G!" 

Alice frowned: "Boys must not UU 

Such expressions! Y? 
Always mind your PP and QQ, 

Never wink your I!" 

How those kids began to TT 

Alice — can't you C? 
Pelted her with fat green PP 

Soft as soft could B. 

Till a dreadful sight to C 

Was her white PK; 
Greener than the greenest T, 

Made her look a J. 

When they pulled her auburn Q 

Tears gushed from her II, 
While she sobbed: "Quite lost on U 

Are my words most YY?" 

Gentle reader, would you B 

A Reformer? — U 
Con this tale, which has, you'll C, 

Sure for you a Q. 

— Laura G. Woodoerry in Saturday Evening Post. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

1 Subscription, One Year = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies = x = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1912-1913. 

Caroline Clarke Jones, Editor-in-Chief. 

Julia Washington Allen, Mary Brown Butler, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Ellen Armistead Johnson, Susie McIver, Elise Gordon Stiles, 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry, Amy Conyers Winston. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, Business Manager. 

Myrtle Warren, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



Founders' Day 



All Saints' Day has a special significance to St. Mary's girls for it 
is also Founders' Day. We here at St. Mary's always think of Dr. 
Aldert Smedes and those others who with him, helped to found St. 
Mary's on the firm rock on which it now stands. All Saints' Day is a 
"St. Mary's Day" and the thoughts of all St. Mary's girl no matter 
where they be come back here for that one day above all others. 



School Girl Gossip 



I wonder if all of us realize how much harm we do by gossip, idle 
gossip ? In the afternoons and at nights after study hall we gather 
in each other's rooms and talk about our neighbors. Girls, do you 
call that improving your minds ? Of course, when you come to board- 
ing school you are not expected to spend your entire time studying; 
but don't you think that it would be better to spend your spare time in 
playing basketball or tennis than in lying around in your rooms talk- 
ing about your neighbors ? No, you are not here to study all of the 
time, but we all must study some and we keep our minds as well as our 



44 The St. Mary's Muse. 



bodies so much healthier by doing things that are better for us — we a 
talk too much — we are women — but why do we have to talk about 01 
neighbors ? Girls, think about this and see if you don't agree with n: 
that it's much better to either play basketball and tennis or talk abo 
other things and not about your neighbors. 



The Literary Societies 



There are three literary societies this year at St. Mary's — the Signi 
Lambda, Epsilon Alpha Pi and the Alpho Rho. Alpha Rho was jus 
established this year. We realized this year at the opening of schoc 
that with one hundred and eighty girls here, more than St. Mary' 
has ever had before, that it was necessary to make a third society 
Alpha Rho was formed and named after Abram Ryan, another one o 
our great Southern poets. The societies are for the purpose of pre 
moting and cultivating literary taste and interest. This is what eac 
society is striving for and we hope this purpose is being accomplished 
Each society has at present sixty members and so we are able to get u] 
very good and attractive programs. Sigma Lambda has just had 
printed program made which is for the Advent Term. In this way th 
girls know weeks beforehand what they have to do and can work it U] 
to the best advantage. 

All of the societies have meetings every Tuesday night. These meet 
ings consist in debates, musical programs and study of countries anc 
writers. Another feature of the societies is the Inter-Society meet 
ings. These meetings are held once a month and on special occasion? 
such as Founders' Day, Thanksgiving Day and Lee's birthday. Bu 
the greatest event of the whole year is the Inter-Society debate whicl 
occurs the last of April. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnse Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President - - . . Mrs. R. W. Winston, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

■c.„,„o„ „„.„*„„ f Miss Anna N. Butxon, Winston-Salem. 

Field Secretaries - - { Miss Annie Root, Raleigh. 

EDITORIAL 



The Traveling Secretaries for the Alumnae, Misses Anna Buxton and 
Annie Root, completed their visits in western and eastern North Caro- 

' olina respectively on the ninth of November. They are now preparing 
comprehensive reports of their visits, which are to be published in full 

l; in the next Alumna? Muse. The Secretaries adhered closely to the 
schedule announced in the October Muse, with the exception of a few 

! minor changes in Miss Buxton's itinerary, which included a visit to 
Henderson which was not scheduled, and where she had one of the 
largest and most enthusiastic meetings. Speaking briefly at the 
Raleigh Chapter meeting on November 11, they reported that the 
general aim of their visits — the organizing of Chapters, the revising of 
lists of the alumnae in the different towns, and the effort to bring into 
closer touch the separate Chapters and the general body of the Alumnse — 
was everywhere furthered, and a successful fulfillment seemed assured. 
The Baltimore and New York chapters have both sent notices of Novem- 
ber meetings. Their reports have not yet reached us, but we hope to 
include their full reports and lists of members in the next Alumnse 
Muse. The Raleigh Chapter as usual held its fall meeting at St. 
Mary's. The meeting was a satisfactory one, and matters of impor- 
tance were discussed. A full report of this meeting is ready, but it 
will appear with the other reports in the Alumnae Muse. 



46 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Dwelle— Myers 

Mr. and Mrs. John Springs Myers 

request the pleasure of your 

company at the marriage reception of their daughter 

Mary Morgan 

and 

Mr. Harold Cothran Dwelle 

on the evening of Thursday, the fourteenth of November 

at half after eight o'clock 

at Eight hundred and four East Avenue 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



Moore— Barber 
Mr. and Mrs. William Wainwright Barber 
invite you to be present at the 
marriage of their daughter 
Margaret Taylor 
to 
Mr. William Carroll Moore, Jr. 
Thursday, November the fourteenth 
at high noon 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church 
Wilkesboro, North Carolina 
At Home 
after November the twenty-fifth 
Lenoir, North Carolina 



Elmore— Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. James Dobbin Holmes 

request the honor of your 

presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Margaret Robinson Williams 

to 
Mr. Thomas Taylor Elmore 
on the evening of Thursday the fourteenth of November 
one thousand nine hundred and twelve 
at six o'clock 
Church of the Good Shepherd 
Jacksonville, Florida 
At Home 
after December the twentieth 
1035 May Street 



The St. Mary's Muse. 47 

Vann— Dixon 

Mr. Minton Hughes Dixon 

requests the honor of your presence at 

the marriage of his daughter 

Elizabeth McDonald 

to 

Mr. Aldridge Henley Vann s 

on Thursday the fourteenth of November 

one thousand nine hundred and twelve 

at high noon 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church 

Edenton, North Carolina 



Tabb-Short 
Mr. Henry Blount Short 
requests the honor of your presence 
at the marriage of his sister 
Marguerite Ashley 
to 
Mr. Thomas Garnett Tabb 
on Thursday, the twenty-first of November 
at six o'clock 
at St. James's Church 
Wilmington, North Carolina 
Will be at home 
after the first of January 
The Chesterfield, Richmond, Virginia 



Sou thgate— McDonald 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Chalmers McDonald 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Loula Shotwell 

to 

Mr. Thomas Fuller Southgate 

on Thursday evening, the twenty-first of November 

nineteen hundred and twelve 

at six o'clock 

The Church of the Good Shepherd 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



48 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Van Patten— Boylan 

Mr. William Boylan 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of his daughter 

Josephine Engelhard 

to 

Mr. Ellsworth Harper Van Patten 

Passed Assistant Paymaster, United States Navy 

on the evening of Saturday, the twenty-third of November 

at six o'clock 

at Christ Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



HJanes— Drewry 

Mr. and Mrs. John Colin Drewry 

request the honor of 

your presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Emmie Louise 

to 

Mr. James Gordon Hanes 

on the evening of Tuesday, the twenty-sixth of November 

at nine o'clock 

at Christ Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Williams— Emerson 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Martin Emerson 

request the pleasure of your 

company at the marriage reception of their daughter 

Lillie Elliotte 

and 

Mr. Albert Sidney Williams 

on the evening of Wednesday, the twenty-seventh of November 

at six o'clock 

at One thousand seven hundred and five, Market Street 

Wilmington, North Carolina 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Ready-to' Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls. 




Fayetteville 
Street 



£f r gxxxxxx&& 




8- Exclusive 



H Millinery 



Katharine: — That old fashioned pendant looks like it might be an heirloom. 
Nannie (indignantly) — It's no such thing; it's a real amethyst. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 



MILLINERY 



■«$;$€©««■ 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' PINE SHOES H® SLIPPERS 



' It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Sain? Mary's School Libra' 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Established 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 

COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

WE SELL, GOSSARD'S LACE 

FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. G. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



Grace (upon first seeing the practice halls) : — Oh, J- 
the bowling alleys! 



do come look a 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


The 
MOST POPULAR? 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGC 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


Ask the Girls 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Advertisements. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



IOBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 



3ood Things Always at 



BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 



124 Fayetteville Street 



harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

iIenby S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
I1 18 E. Davie Street Raleigh, N, C 



KIN G-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 



G. H. DORTCH, 

Secretary. 



R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



AND THEY WERE SENIORS! 
Amy: — Caroline, tell me, how do you spell gymnasium? 
Caroline: — J-i-m — I can't get any further. 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowel! 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT GOMPAN 

Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones 



■■{ 



174 

226 



COLLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Specis 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 

Coat Suits, School Dresses, Evening- Costumes, "Waists, Coats, and Accessory Line 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trimmings, Gloves, Hosiery, Laces, Notions, Etc. 



McKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. 



Fayetteville St 



C. E. HARTGE 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 


Architect 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds ol Keys Bicycle Supplu 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 



First New Girl: — Can you tell me where the Art Building is? 
Second New Girl: — Top floor, Main Building, I think. 

Mr. Stone (in Sunday School) : — Why were the first churches built? 
Grace O: — To keep off the rain. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 

HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 

Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
i'he Wake Drug- Store. Phones 228 



ICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE 
Prompt Delivery 



Phones 107 



folly &• Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINEBT 



PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 



IRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 

fi DARNELL & THOMAS 

MUSIC HOUSE 

WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
' W. Hargett Street Phone 619 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties, 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 
222 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 

WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 COR. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS 



Mrs. C had just been reading an article about India and how the Hindoos 

acrificed kids to their gods. 
Julia C. (interrupting) : — You-you mean — Which kind? 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



v. w. CROXTON, 

Traffic Manager, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. UPCHURCH, 

General Agrent, RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C" Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located a 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th St?., Washington, D. C, is now showing th« 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and importec 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable nai 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 1 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades 



PERRY'S ART STORE 
S. Wilmington Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicitec 

THE MECHANICS SAYING BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALENDAR 



October-November. 

October 23. Mrs. Lay's party to the Senior Class. 
October 24. Talk by Miss Shattuck in school room. 
October 29. Ringling Brothers Circus. 

October 31. Hallowe'en Party. Pupils' recital in Auditorium. 
November 1. All Saints' Day. Founders' Day. Inter-society meeting in parlor 
November 2. Miss Urquhart's party to the Junior Class. 
November 7. Talk by Mr. Lay in school room. 
November 11. Teachers' recital in Auditorium. 
November 13. Senior Class at home to the Faculty. 
November 14. Othello at the Academy of Music. 
November 15. Mrs. Lay's party to the Monitors. 
November 16. Sophomore party to the Senior Class. Junior party to the Fresh- 
man Class. 
November 28. Thanksgiving Day. 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

All Our Work Done by The Goodyear Welt System 
104 E. Harg-ett Street 



THE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A, & M. 
Athletic Association. $1.50 per year. Walter 
C. Taylor, B us. M gr., West R aleigh, N . C. 

~~ mrsTfrank REDFORD 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishmen 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury Street 



TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishing: 



8 and 10 East Hargett Street 



Personal attention to mail orders. 



Bell Phone 43! 



BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST DRY GOOD STORE 

Come and See Us in Our New Home 

Everything- for Woman's Wear. Ready-to- Wear Garments of all Kinds 



Locatio n Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healt hy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C 

{for girls and young women) 



71st ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 19, 1912. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 1913. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ *• TEE MUSIC SCHOOL. 



offers instruction in these 

Departments: J 4. THE ART SCHOOL. 



3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

4 THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to tht 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



.. ■.'■-.' 



•' '? 



tKfje 



g>t jfHarp'S ifHu^e 



Becemfcer, 1912 




Ealeigl), B. C 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

CHRISTMAS NUMBER 
r OL. XVlI December, 1912. No. 3 



Christmas Doubts 



The holly wreath's hung at the window, 

The mistletoe's over the door, 
The last of our gifts and their packing 

Are gayly spread over the floor. 

The Santa Claus myth is a by-gone 

A tale of my earliest youth; 
We scarce can deceive our small Bobby, 

At five he suspects, too, the truth. 

But we've hung up our same row of stockings, 
We're fond of old customs, you know; 

Then we take a last look out the window, 
As the shadows dance over the snow. 

Soon tucked in our beds we are dreaming, 

Then suddenly Bob and I wake; 
That sound on the roof in the chimney — 

O Bobby, for dear goodness sake — 

It's only a mouse or — a reindeer — 

Now lie down and go back to sleep; 
I'll just take a look out the window, 

O only a tiny, wee peep. 

O, the tiny, dear fellow, 

O Bobby, do come here and see 
Do you think it might really be Santa? 

Do you think it could possibly be? 

He's going as fast as a comet, 

He's now quite gone out of sight, 
And our stockings — they're packed full of good things, 

O when will it ever get light? 

And now that I'm calmer by daylight, 

The excitement is somewhat forgot, 
Did I dream? was I sleeping or waking? 

Now was it old Santa or not? 



50 The St. Mary's Muse. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



LAURA MARGARET HOPPE and MARY BROWN BUTLER, Editors 



A Trip to Mount Mitchell 

(A Travel Sketch.) 



Caroline Clarke Jones. 

"Good night; I'll see you at five," and away we went to bed, for we 
must rise early the next morning and start on our journey to Mt. Mitch- 
ell. Mt. Mitchell ! Oh ! the remembrance of Physical Geography when 
we said with pride, "Mt. Mitchell, North Carolina ; elevation 6711 
feet; the highest mountain east of the Rockies." 

At five sharp we were up and ready to start. We filled the wagon 
with blankets, raincoats, sweaters, but most of all and most important, 
with food. We even tied the huge coffee pot and the lantern to the 
tongue. After a good breakfast, the last for three days, we piled into 
the wagon amid many cries of "good-bye," "be careful," and "come 
back Saturday night." 

There were ten of us in the party — four girls, five boys and our 
chaperone. We knew what we had before us, so most of the morning 
we stayed in the wagon, singing and looking at the wonderful scenery. 
The road wound through green woods, beside shallow, sparkling brooks 
and through pleasant little farms in the valleys. Whenever the road 
emerged from the woods we could see across daisy filled meadows the 
blue mountains towering in the distance. We stopped at Toe River 
for a hasty dinner, for we must make the foot of the mountain before 
dark. We were tired of riding, so after dinner most of us walked. 
We soon came into a forest so beautiful that it seemed a part of a 
fairy tale. The river bubbled between its shrubbery banks. Many 
of the rhododendrons were still in bloom ; gigantic trees rose all around 
us. The ground was covered with velvety moss, exquisite ferns and 
pale yellow wild flowers. Everything was still and lifeless and we 
felt as if we were in an enchanted wood. We passed through this fairy 
forest and came to a farm house. We were at the foot and here we 



The St. Mary's Muse. 51 

pitched camp for the night. We girls cooked supper, and such supper ! 
fat bacon rolled in corn meal, hot flapjacks, fried ham, crackers and 
jelly and coffee. No meal at the Waldorf-Astoria could have tasted 
better to us. After supper, as it was quite dark, we made our fire 
bigger and then went down to see the moonlight on the river. Of course, 
I had to break the enchantment of the wonderful moonlight on the 
sparkling water by slipping off a huge rock and plunging in. 

We all then went back to the fire, which was burning brightly, and 
sang and told stories. We felt like we were real magazine characters — 
or else as if we were posing for an A. B. film, sitting there around the 
fire with our hair in two plaits over our shoulders and telling stories. 
All of us were tired and, knowing that we had a hard day before us, 
■ were not romantic enough to linger long around the fire. 

We were up bright and early the next morning and at six were ready 
to start up. It was a long, tedious climb. We stopped for dinner where 
our trail joined the Black Mountain trail, and after about an hour's 
rest started bravely for the top. When we came in sight of the monu- 
ment we became energetic once more and raced to the top. The top 
of Mt. Mitchell ! Oh ! what memories that brings back. First the 
monument to Dr. Mitchell, which is thoroughly disappointing. Up 
there, were everything is natural and rugged, one looks for a huge 
boulder or else a pile of unhewn stones set up in memory of the scientist 
who lost his life on the mountain. Instead there is a small imitation 
marble shaft. Visitors from year to year have scrawled their names 
over it. Next, the scenery, which is not at all disappointing, for you 
can see for miles in every direction the magnificent blue mountains in 
the distance and the dark green ones near at hand. We did not have 
much time to exclaim over the scenery as we must fix some place to 
sleep. We all went to work with a will gathering sticks to make a fire. 
We had to gather enough to last all night, because when it got dark it 
was dangerous to wander far from the monument. After enough wood 
was gathered to last all night, the boys cut down balsam trees and made 
a hut to protect us from the wind. By five-thirty we were ready for 
the night and the cold wind which we knew would come when the sun 
went down. Sunset was the most beautiful sight I have ever seen. 



52 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Such colors and shadows ! From a deep purple to a light pink and then 
the blues. The sky was bluer than I have ever seen it. It does not 
take long for the sun to sink in the mountains and after it had gone, 
oh ! how cold we got. We started a big fire, but it did not burn long, 
as the wood was wet. None of us slept much that night as we spent 
most of our time trying to make the fire burn. The only time that I 
slept was when I got down in Dr. Mitchell's grave. Around the monu- 
ment are piled rocks to mark which way the grave lies and I got down 
behind the rocks and slept for a little while. Though I am scary, I 
never thought of ghosts and spooks that night. 

We stayed on top to see sunrise and that again was wonderful. The 
sun seemed to rise right out of a bank of clouds. Below us we saw the 
clouds between the mountain ridges like the foam crests on the ocean 
waves. 

Going down was much easier than coming up and we reached the 
bottom in less than three hours. We all stayed in the wagon most of 
the day. That night we pitched camp at Harvard. We were up early 
the next morning and were back at Little Switzerland by dinner time. 
Some few said they would never go again. But the majority of us 
declared that we had had the time of our lives and would go again the 
next chance we got. 



An Attempt to Play Santa Claus 



Laura Placidia Clark. 

Harold, a ten-year-old, and his twin sister Jane, were for the first 
time spending Christmas at the Glenview, the home of their grand- 
parents. Glenview consisted of a large plantation with the house — a 
big colonial dwelling — set far back from the road. The things that 
chiefly attracted the twins' attention were the large fireplaces. They 
were accustomed in their city home to steam heat, and thus these fire- 
places were a source of wonder and delight to them. 

"It will be easy for Santa Claus to get down these fireplaces, won't 
it ?" questioned Jane. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 53 

i "Oh, an idea! We'll play Santa Claus to the housekeeper's child. 

J She has a fireplace in her room." It was Harold who spoke this time 

— he had a fondness for ideas — "and I heard her say that Santa didn't 

ever come to see her." 

i "Fine! but how'll we do it?" Jane was ever ready to consent to 

anything that Harold planned. 

"That's easy. I'm afraid to come down the chimney, but you know 
i Mrs. McGon never has a fire in her room at night and we can get some 
toys and hide in the fireplace. After everybody's asleep we'll come out 
and be Santa Claus, but I never heard of Mrs. Santa's coming." 

Jane promptly replied that she would be Mrs. Santa, because she 
could not be a reindeer, and nobody else came with Santa Claus. Thus 
i the plans were laid. 

The twins were very busy all of Christmas Eve collecting such things 
i as they could find that could be given to the little McGon child. Their 
I grandmother had prepared for their coming and this was not a difficult 
job. 

Much to the surprise of their elders they were willing to go upstairs 
at eight-thirty. After the usual good-night kisses and much excited 
questioning about the time of Santa's arrival they went upstairs, but 
only to stay a short time. 

"Now, come on, we're all ready and maybe Sana Claus will come to 
see us while we're gone." 

"But," objected Jane, "he might think we're not here and won't 
leave us anything if he don't see us." 

"Aw, come on." Harold was a little cooled by this, but thought 
himself too much of a man to back down now. 

Two little figures, fortunately dressed in flannels, each carrying an 
armful of toys, crept silently down the stairs and into Mrs. McGon's 
room. 

"Ugh ! that fireplace looks so black ! let's leave these things and go 
back upstairs." 

But Harold, with great determination, walked straight into the huge 
fireplace without once thinking of the soot. "It is black in here," he 
thought, "but it'll never do to let sister think I'm afraid." And she, 



54 The St. Maby's Muse. 



as usual, followed his example and tried to get as comfortable as pos- 
sible in the other corner. 

Everything was quiet for about two minutes and then Jane said, 
"Wonder how long before Marie McGon and her mother are coming." 

"S-s-sh, they'll be here presently and I hope they go to sleep soon." 

Silence reigned for about five minutes and Jane spoke once more, 
"Harold, aren't you a teeny bit sleepy ? I feel mighty comfortable in 
this corner." 

"Eoh! Hush!" 

Again a silence of about five minutes and again it was broken by 
Jane, "Harold, aren't they ever coming? I'm tired of waiting." 

Harold's response had a little bit of drowsiness in it this time. 

The silence that then ensued was of a longer duration than before. 

Meanwhile, the grandmother wishing to see her darlings once more 
before she went to sleep, had gone in their room and, finding the empty 
beds, had called their mother. Then followed a frantic search under 
beds, in closets, behind trunks, and in every imaginable place two such 
children could be hid. At first, the family was not alarmed for the 
twins were often found in some out-of-the-way place, but soon some 
anxiety was felt. 

"Could they possibly have been stolen ?" anxiously questioned the 
mother, and no one knew. 

A different scene was taking place in the room downstairs. Mrs. 
McGon had come in and put Marie to sleep. It was a very sad thought 
to her that Marie could not have the pleasure of a visit from Santa 
Claus, but she was a widow and her only inheritance was debts. She 
was just preparing to go to sleep when she heard a sound in the direc- 
tion of the fireplace. Thinking that no one would be foolish enough 
to break in her poor bare room she was not alarmed, but she heard 
it a second time and this time it was distinctly some one moving. 
Silently she got out of the room and hastened to find some men. How 
was she to know that the sound was merely a little girl turning over in 
her sleep ? 

The twins' father stopped his search and, cautiously entering the 
McGons' room, threw a flashlight into the fireplace. Imagine his sur- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 55 



.; prise when he found that "the burglars" were his own children ! The 
excitement waked them up and there were some tears and much laugh- 

i ter over their explanation. 

You may well believe that they were two black little Santa Clauses 
that were received in their mother's arms; also, that a much better 
Santa Claus came to see Marie McGron. 



A Christmas Sketch 



Rebecca Deveretjx Kyle. 
" 'Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the house 
Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse; 
The children were nestled all snug in their beds, 
While visions of sugar-plums danced through their heads." 

In the glimmering firelight two children could be seen snugly tucked 
in their little white beds, side by side. Certainly visions of sugar- 
plums or of something good must be dancing in their heads, for Molly 
lay with one fat, pink arm clasped over her head and a, smile of blissful 
anticipation on her chubby face, while Jack dreamed blissfully of the 
visit of "Saint JSTick" and tossed restlessly, murmuring something 
about "Reindeers." On the foot of each bed was hung a tiny stocking 
and already each one was filled with the longed-for goodies and toys. 
Molly's was full to the brim with everything her childish heart could 
desire, from a big red apple in the toe to a lovely French doll just 
peeping out at the top. Jack's was filled with guns, tops, and at the 
very top is a big silver watch with a long, heavy chain so that he would 
be sure not to lose it. 

Slowly the firelight died and the shadows crept out from the walls 
until the room was left in utter darkness. In the distance could be 
heard the ringing of the glad Christmas bells as they welcomed the 
happy day, for it was midnight, that "witching" hour when gnomes 
and goblins play. It is that time of all the year when everything can 
speak — cows and horses and, yes ! even dolls and watches ! In the 
solemn silence the only sound that broke the stillness was the slow 
"tick, tick, tick" of the big silver watch which was in the top of Jack's 
stocking. There one could hear a smothered yawn as of some one 
2 



56 The St. Mary's Muse. 



awakening from a long, dreamless sleep. Then — a small, sleepy voice 
whispered, "Oh ! is there any one here who will talk to me ? I am so 
tired of being just stupid and silent. I must speak to some one or else 
I will die of loneliness during the next year." 

Suddenly out of the intense stillness came the monotonous voice of 
the watch speakiug, "I will tell you the story of my life and then you 
will know why it is that I keep on 'ticking' incessantly and never stop. 
I was made in Germany. Who could guess from looking at my com- 
monplace face at the toil and trouble that it took to make me ? I was 
made by an old German watchmaker who was very poor and had a 
large family of little ones to support. One does not earn many marks 
as a watchmaker and Christmas was drawing near and the children 
just had to have Santa Claus bring them something. So the old 
watchmaker set to work to make a watch the like of which had never 
been seen before. He took the greatest care in constructing me and I 
am made in such a manner that I will run forever without stopping. 
The old watchmaker never could have achieved this result if it had 
not been that he accompanied his work with many loving thoughts of 
Christmas and of the people poorer than he whom he would help. 
Then he thought of how thankful he ought to be for his many blessings 
and he instilled this spirit of thankfulness in me. My mission in life 
is to be always working and thus I will try to bring 'Peace on earth 
good will towards men.' " 

"Oh," yawned the French doll, "that's a very interesting story, but 
what a humdrum existence you must lead. I don't envy you your work. 
As for me" — But her sentence was never finished because midnight 
was past and she could speak no more for another year. 

In the gray dawn of Christmas day Molly began to stir, and then 
with a little gurgle of delight she made a dive for her stocking and 
pulled out the French doll. "Oh — Jack !" was all she could say, but 
Jack had no time to look at dolls, for he had already grabbed his stock- 
ing and now had his watch out, holding it to his ear. "It's already 
goin'. Wonder if Santy wound it for me," said he. 

A few minutes later mammy came in, bowing and curtseying. 
"Christmas gif, chillun, Christmas gif ' ! I'se dun kotched yer now!" 



The St. Mary's Muse. 57 

At the Bulletin Board 

(An E very-day Sketch .) 



Melba McCulleks. 

Oh, dear ! such a crowd around the bulletin board ! What can be 
posted there to cause such excitement ? "What is it ?" calls an old girl 
to those near the front, "are the marks posted ?" 

"Oh, no," answers a new girl, "but it's just as bad — it's the classifi- 
cations. Do come and see what you are. I have never been as mad 
in all my life. Me a Freshman ! The very idea, when I graduated 
from the high school last year with highest honors They told me before 
I came I could enter Junior, and I don't see why I'm not classed as a 
Junior when everything I take is Junior. I have Junior English, His- 
tory and Philosophy, and am going to try for a certificate in music. I 
simply don't understand why I'm classed as a Freshman. I'm going 

straight to Mr. C ■ this minute and ask him to explain. Here, you 

can have my place. Do let me out. I'm going to Mr. C right 

now. I never have been as mad in all my " but the rest was lost 

as she disappeared within the portals of East Rock. 

"Poor child," sighed the old girl who had taken her place. "She cer- 
tainly has a lot to learn — about classifications at least. But I don't 
think she ought to fuss so, for she's not half as bad off as I am. Here 
am I, an old girl with Junior and Senior studies, classed as a Sopho- 
more. I think it's terrible, but the only way is to grin and bear it. 

But I guess I'm just naturally used to Mr. C 's classifications by 

this time. Well, guess I'd better go 'unit.' So long, everybody!" 
then she, too, is gone. 

Her place, however, is quickly filled, for here come two more girls 
who push their way to the front. "Well, sport," said one to her friend, 
a little girl with a pug nose, "I see my name already. I'm a Soph — 
you are, too, aren't you? Isn't it just grand to be Sophs? I'm so 
glad I'm not a Freshman any more. Just look at that long list. 
Wouldn't you hate to see your name there, though ? Some one said 
there were seventy Freshies. Let's see who they are. Why — what — 
just look there!" 



58 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Well, I never ! That is the limit. I'm not a Freshman, I'm a 
Sophomore. Why, I never heard of such a thing." The pug-nosed little 
girl was getting quite indignant. "Of course I'm a Sophomore. This 
is my second year and I've taken everything in the course. Yes, I 

know I did drop Latin last year, but Mr. C said it would be all 

right, that I could be a Sophomore this year and make up Latin this 
summer and be a full Junior next year. So I certainly don't see why 
he had to go class me as a Freshman. But I'll get even with him yet. 
You just see if I don't go to both parties, Freshman and Sophomore, 

and get everything imaginable to eat, too. And Mr. C can't say 

a word, for he told me himself I could be a Soph and then classed me 
as a Freshman. Yes, I am going to both parties. So there ! But I 
do think I might have been a Sophomore." 

Now, this is but one short scene of the comedy — or is it tragedy — 
enacted at the bulletin board when classifications are posted. Who 
could begin to give even one act, much less all ? For with joy so the 
Seniors come and with pride do the Juniors go, but with endless indig- 
nation and regret do the might-have-beens go on forever. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



ELLEN ARMI STEAD JOHNSON and ELIZABETH ANDERSON TARRY, Editors 



Nov. 15— Mrs. Lay's Party to the Monitors 

At five o'clock on Friday afternoon, November 15, the monitors were 
delightfully entertained at the rectory. We were cordially received by 
Mrs. Lay, who invited us all in to sit down by a big open fire; and 
there punch and sandwiches were served by "Lucy" and "Ellen." While 
eating we discussed "Othello," which had been played at the Academy 
the night before. The hour seemed unusually short, and we all hated 
to hear the dinner bell ring after having spent such an enjoyable after- 
noon. E. A. T. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 59 

Nov. 16— The Senior-Sophomore Party 

On Saturday night, November 16, the Sophomores entertained the 
Seniors at a most delightful party in the Muse room. The amusement 
was in the form of games, such as jackstraws, dominoes, fascination, 
i caroms, parchesi and tiddledy-winks. There were six tables, at each 
of which played two Seniors and two Sophomores. The score cards 
were "13s" and "15s" painted on cardboard in the respective colors of 
the classes. At intervals of two minutes a bell was rung and the part- 
ners who were in the lead progressed to the next table. Salted peanuts 
i and peppermints were served while the games were being enjoyed and 
at the end of eight games delicious ice cream and cake were served, the 
color scheme being carried out in the minutest details. Caroline Jones 
•j and Susanne Busbee both having been lucky enough to win the greatest 
| number of games, had to decide by "fascination" to whom the lot would 
I fall. Caroline Jones, being the lucky one, received as a souvenir of 
. the occasion a "wooly 'possum," and "Elizabeth Cherry received a 
"jumping jack" to console her for her ill-luck. This was one of the 
most unique and enjoyable parties that has ever been given at St. 
Mary's and the Seniors all said that "they had never had as good a time 
in their lives." 



Nov. 16— Junior-Freshman Party 

On Saturday, November 16, the Juniors delightfully entertained the 
Freshmen in the parlor, which was beautifully decorated with the 
colors of the two classes. A charming talk was made by Myrtle War- 
ren, the president of the Junior class, which put the Freshmen quite 
at their ease. Following this, burlesque tableaux presented by members 
of the Junior class were given, a unique form of entertainment which 
was much enjoyed. The tableaux were "The Saving of Captain John 
Smith by Pocahontas," "Jack Spratt and His Wife," and "A Maid on 
a Summer Day." Delicious refreshments were served, after which 
Maie London, the president of the Freshman class, thanked the Juniors 
in behalf of her class for a most enjoyable evening. M. L. 



60 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Nov. 25— Mu-Sigma Basket Ball Game 

On Monday afternoon, November 25, the rival teams of Mu and 
Sigma met for their first great contest of the year. Both sides had 
a strong and vociferous party of supporters present who did their be$ti 
by songs and cheers to encourage their own players and to "rattle" their 
opponents, but all this added much to the gaiety of the game and to the 
enjoyment of the more disinterested spectators. 

The score tied several times during the game, showing that the teams 
were very evenly matched, but the final score was in favor of the Sigmas 
— 16 to 14:. There was excellent playing on both sides, though the 
chief honors should go perhaps to Elizabeth Walker, Frances Walters, 
and Mary Butler of the Mu, and to Elizabeth Candler and Tallulah De 
Rosset of the Sigma. 

The line-up was as follows: 

Mu. Sigma. 

E. Carrison Center O. Smith 

M. Butler Side Center W. Rogers 

E. Walker Right Forward E. Candler 

F. Strong Left Forward T. DeRosset 

F. Walters Right Guard M. Dortch 

C. Smith Left Guard M. Robinson 



Nov. 30— Christmas Entertainment 

On Saturday evening, November 30, the children in the primary 
and preparatory department gave a "Christmas Entertainment" in the 
auditorium, supervised by Miss Davis. The entertainment was opened 
by Jane Kerr, who read a "Voice from a Far Country." This was fol- 
lowed by a "Festival of the Seasons," in which Bessie Folk as "Father 
Time" called for a review of all the seasons and the elements — Day, 
Night, Bain, Snow, Hallowe'en, and on through to Christmas Day 
(Nancy Lay) — which v/as voted by Father Time and all present as 
the "Greatest Day of the Year." Frances Walker then read "The Gift 
of the Miagi," and then "The Christmas Guest," a one-act miracle play 
was given by the older children in the preparatory class, and was very 
well acted. The whole entertainment was very attractive and showed 
the most careful training. The audience was large and enjoyed the 
evening thoroughly. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 61 

Dec. 2 — Peace-St. Mary's Concert 

The first of the series of PeacenSt. Mary's Concerts was given in the 
auditorium at St. Mary's on the evening of December 2, by Hans 
Kronold, 'cellist, assisted by Miss Diana Yorke, soprano. Mr. Kronold 
played six groups, which included two numbers of his own, and in all 
of them he delighted his audience. The full richness of his tones and 
his masterly execution marked him as one of the very greatest in his 
art. 

Miss York sang an aria from Tosca, and a group of children's 
songs in English, besides several encores that were enthusiastically 
called for. She was very charming in both voice and manner, and her 
singing was a great addition to an already attractive program. 



Dec. 7—" The Dress Rehearsal " 

"The Dress Rehearsal," a bright and tuneful operetta, was given by 
Mr. Owen's chorus class on the evening of December 7. It was delight- 
ful in every way and the large audience enjoyed it all thoroughly, to 
judge by their repeated and hearty applause. The story shows a girls' 
boarding school rehearsing for "Cinderella," a burlesque play. Jennie 
Bell Boyden was a lovely and graceful Cinderella, who sang delight- 
fully. Other singing parts that were very well taken were the "Fairy 
Godmother," Margaret Thomas, and "The Spiteful Sisters," Marguer- 
ite Blakely and Frances Sears, while the more humorous parts of the 
schoolmistress, Amy Winston; the "Greedy Girl," Elizabeth Tarry, 
and the "Romantic Girl," Agnes Reese, furnished fun and laughter 
all through the piece. The choruses were very pretty to look at as well 
as to hear, and the whole play went off with a sparkle and vim that 
reflected great credit on Mr. Owen and on Miss Shattuck, who assisted 
him. 

DRAMATIS PERSONS. 

Miss Jones, Principal of Grove House Academy Miss Amy Winston 

Mdlle. Epinard, French Governess Miss Gertrude Brigham 

Amy Pibbs, afterwards Cinderella Miss Jennie Belle Boyden 

Clara Wilkins, afterwards the Prince Miss Louise Durkee 

Sarah Ann, the Greedy Girl Miss Elizabeth Tarry 



62 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Sophonisba Spivins, Romantic Girl Miss Agnes Reese 

Martha Higgins ~i ( Miss Marguerite Blakelt 

v, afterwards Spiteful Sisters J 
Carry Jackson j | Miss Prances Sears 

Mrs. Jarvey, Elocution Mistress Miss Blanche Shattuck 

Prudence Pinchbeck, a Visitor Miss Mary Disbro 

Rosa Jennings, afterwards Fairy Godmother Miss Margaret Thomas 

Servant Miss Katherine Bunn 

Humpie Miss Lois Pugh 



SCHOOL GOSSIP 



ELISE GORDON STILES and MYRTLE WARREN, Editors 



Janie Kerr's brother was here a few days ago. 

We are all very glad that Mary Vose is able to be with us again. 

Melba McCullers has just enjoyed a short visit from her mother. 

Jennie Bell Boy den has recently enjoyed a short visit from her 
sister. 

Mr. Lay spent November 29 and 30 in Greensboro at the Teachers' 
Assembly. 

Janie Rowland had the pleasure of having her mother with her a 
short time ago. 

Miss Gardiner of Concord, 1ST. H., was the charming guest of the 
Lays last month. 

Mary Polk McGehee, a last year's girl, paid a visit to the school the 
latter part of November. 

Helen Peoples went to Warrenton for a few days last month to 
attend her brother's wedding. 

Mr. E. T. Kyle of Norfolk, Va., was here a few days the last of 
the month to see his daughter, Rebecca. 

On the night of jSTovember 18 thirty St. Mary's girls went to the 
Auditorium to hear William Jennings Bryan deliver his lecture for the 
benefit of Rex Hospital on the "Making of a Man." They found the 
lecture and the personality of the speaker both very interesting and 
reported that they spent a very enjoyable evening. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 63 

It will be of interest to recent St. Mary's girls to know that Nell 
Lewis, '11, who has entered the Freshman class of Goucher College, is 
president of her class. 

On Monday evening, November 18, a most enjoyable concert was 
given at Meredith College by the Saslavsky string orchestra, consisting 
of a first and second violin, viola and 'cello. The programme was 
unusually interesting and the musicians showed complete mastery of 
their instruments. A number of the St. Mary's music pupils were pres- 
ent and enjoyed the evening greatly. 

The following card was received by friends at St. Mary's. It prob- 
ably means that Kathryn Parker has given up her idea of college and 
has made her formal entrance into society. 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew McClean Parker 
Miss Kathryn de Rosset Parker 

Saturday, December the seventh Princeton 

from four until six New Jersey 

On Monday afternoon, November 18, Florence Stone celebrated her 
seventeenth birthday by a charming card party. Those enjoying her 
hospitality are Dorothy Hood, Adriana Webb, Ovid Webb, Elizabeth 
Lay, Ellen Lay, Frances Strong, Bessie Badham, Grace Crews, Matilda 
Hancock, Marion Smith, Elizabeth Campbell, Lois Pugh, Grace Over- 
man, Eliza Skinner, Agnes Flythe, Margaret, Edna and Edith Mann 
and Annie Cameron. After several interesting games of "hearts," in 
which Ovid Webb won the prize, delicious refreshments were served. 
Having chatted pleasantly 'round the fire, a quarter to six found every 
one very reluctant to go back to school. A. S. C. 



64 The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Clippings Fron) Our Exchanges and Others. 



Twr. 



Mr. Wr. wooed Miss Phr. 

And he kr. 
When Miss Phr. left, then Wr. 

Kr. sr. 
Then Miss Phr.'s haughty sr. 

Slapped bold Mr. Wr. — 
Mr. Wr.'s cheek now wears a 

Painful blr. 



Nature Stories. 

Algy met a bear; 
The bear was bulgy; 
The bulge was Algy. 

Percy thought the lion cute; 
He went too near the cage; 
And so was Persecuted. 



Yet are AliKe in their Limitations. 

Who first called a woman "a cat" 
Was neither observing nor nice; 

There's a very wide difference, I'm sure, 
In the views that they hold about mice. 

Of course, both are purring and soft, 
And alike they will scratch you, but still 

A woman can't run up a tree 
Nor a cat up a milliner's bill. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies = = = = ■ Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumna, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1912-1913. 

Caroline Clarke Jones, Editor-in-Chief. 

Julia Washington Allen, Mary Brown Butler, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Ellen Armistead Johnson, Susie McIver, Elise Gordon Stiles, 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarrt, Amy Conyers Winston. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, Business Manager. 

Myrtle Warren ,Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



Christmas 



Yes, it is Christmas again and we are all sewing and working on 
Christmas presents. But during the rush of the holidays the Muse 
wants you to stop just a second and let it extend you the heartiest 
Christmas greetings ! And though you are going away now we hope 
to welcome you all back after Christmas, and hope that you will have 
"the time of your lives" while you are at home. 

"Home, sweet home !" As the time draws near for the holidays to 
commence our thoughts go to home more than usual. And while you 
are at home please don't any of you decide not to come back after 
Christmas, for we want to see you all back and be able to welcome 
every one of you again to St. Mary's. 



The Athletic Associations 



There are now at St. Mary's two athletic associations, Sigma and 
Mu. The school is divided, half being one and half the other. There 
is very little true athletic spirit at St. Miary's because all of the girls 



66 The St. Mary's Muse. 



have so many interests that are foreign to athletics. The girls that 
pi a j on the Sigma and Mu teams are enthusiastic and maybe one or 
two others, but the rest of the girls take no interest. ~No, that is unfair 
to them, for they do take interest and really show a great deal of spirit 
when we have a basket ball match game. 

Why shouldn't we show more spirit towards basket ball ? Of course, 
we should, and so let's all try after Christmas to be more interested 
and give the teams more encouragement. The athletic associations are 
not only for basket ball, but for tennis, too. Each spring we have a 
tennis tournament and the girls should be practicing all fall to try to 
make the teams. 

The presidents of Mu and Sigma try to make us interested in all 
forms of athletics and don't you think that it is for us to try and help 
them? 

This fall we have had one basket ball game and the girls were all 
very enthusiastic and helped their teams by encouraging them. ISTow 
don't you think that if you can get up enough spirit to go to the games 
and yell yourself hoarse that you ought to have enough Mu and 
Sigma spirit at other times, to help the presidents, and in every way 
to keep up the true athletic spirit at St. Mary's ? 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Oeuikshank - - - - Alumme Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

[Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - -< Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(.Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President .... Mrs. R. W. Winston, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - . - - Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton. 
Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

FiPinSFCRFTABTPs . . f Miss Anna N. Butxon, Winston-Salem. 

*ield [secretaries | Miss Annie Root, Raleigh. 



ALUMNAE NOTES 



Miss Bessie Barnes of Murfreesboro paid a short visit to the school 
| on November 27. 

, Mrs. Alex. Hanes (Mary Robinson) of Winston-Sale was in 
■ Raleigh for the Drewry wedding and was at St. Mary's for one even- 
] ing- 
- Mrs. Charles H. Paine ("Chip" Roberts) of New York spent several 

days with Miss Katie the latter part of November. Mrs. Paine and 

her little son are in New Bern for the winter. 

Miss Sadie Jenkins' visit to her cousin, Gertrude Cornish, just after 

Thanksgiving, was a pleasure to her friends here. Miss Jenkins has 

taught at Winthrop for several years, but has taken this year off for 

rest and study. 

Mrs. and Miss Aiken of Pensacola, Fla., were at St. Mary's several 
times during November visiting Buford Aiken, a granddaughter of 
Mrs. Aiken. Mrs. Aiken was a St. Mary's girl of the '60s and a 
classmate of Mrs. Iredell. 

Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell of Asheville spent an afternoon at St. 
Mary's the latter part of November. Mrs. Mitchell is the head of the 
chapter of St. Mary's Alumnae in Asheville. 

Miss Nancy Fairly of Rockingham was at St. Mary's on December 
6, visiting her sister Dorothy. 



68 The St. Mart's Muse. 

Visitors on December 7 were Misses Blair Bawlings and Georgia 
Hales, '09, of Wilson, and Helen Daniel of Philadelphia. 

Miss Sophy Wood of Edenton called at St. Mary's in December. 
Miss Wood is president of the Edenton chapter of St. Mary's 
Alumnae. 

Miss Margaret Pennington of Tarboro spent a few days with Edith 
Clark during November. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Sheppard -DeVisconti 

Tuesday evening, December 3, Miss Sue May De Visconti, and Mr. 
Ben Streeter Sheppard of Farmville, X. C, were quietly married in 
Christ Church by the Rev. Milton A. Barber. 

Miss De Visconti was at St. Mary's last year and is the first bride 
among the 1912 girls. The Muse offers its sincere wishes for the hap- 
piness of Mr. and Mrs. Sheppard. 



Smith— Sanders 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Sanders 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Mary Louise 

to 

Mr. Mason Allen Smith 

on the evening of Wednesday the eleventh of December 

at half after seven o'clock 

Edenton Street Methodist Church 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

At Home 

after the first of January 

Washington, North Carolina 



The St. Mary's Muse. 69 



McNeill— Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. William Pitz Hugh Williams 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Rosalie Fitz Hugh 

to 

Mr. Thomas Alexander McNeill, Jr. 

on the evening of Wednesday the eighteenth of December 

nineteen hundred and twelve 

at half after seven o'clock 

Saint Stephen's Episcopal Church 

Red Springs, North Carolina 

Miss Williams was a member of the St. Mary's music faculty in 1909- 
1910. She has the best wishes of the Muse. 



READ I— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Ready'tO'Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls. 



Fayetteville 
Street 




{ifexxtxtxx-sZ 




:xclusive 



% Millinery 



"Why do the girls all look so pale?" 
A stranger here might ask; 

But we who live at St. Mary's, 

Know "Thanksgiving" has just past! 

If Thanksgiving were to come again 
'Twould be a thing we'd rue; 

It would only put off Christmas, 
And that would never do. 







THE DOBBIN-FERRALL CO. 




Dry Goods 


" It's worth the difference " 


OF ALL KINDS 


1 
THE TYREE STUDIO 


MILLINERY 


-»£§€■€!€«• 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 


" Workers in Artistic Photography" 


LADIES' FINE SHOES AMD SLIPPERS 

1 


i 



Advertisements 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL <fe BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N. C. 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 

COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

WE SELL, GOSSARD'S LACE 

ERONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Established 1858 

1. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 


COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


SALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



Thanksgiving boxes are over, 
And with them all its joys; 
But compared with Christmas happiness, 
Such things seem merely toys. 



The girls are busy packing, 
Throughout the livelong day; 
"I can not find a single thing!" 
Is all you hear them say. 


Why Is 

Srantley's Fountain 

The 
MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 


J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 

and Power 

f 174 
Both Phones: < ^ofi 



COLLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Special 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 

Coat Suits, School Dresses, Evening- Costumes, "Waists, Coats, and Accessory Lines 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trimming-s, Gloves, Hosiery, Laces, Notions, Etc. 



McKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. 



Fayetteville St. 



C. E. HARTGE 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 


Architect 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds ol Keys Bicycle Suppliei 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 



Thus the last few days are busily spent, 
And are filled with thoughts of bliss; 

But each girl dreads for the time to come 
For the last long parting kiss. 



Mary Butler. 



KING'S GROCERY, 
"The Little Store." 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Faye tteville Street 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 

Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



10BERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 



iooD Things Always at 



BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 



124 Fayetteville Street 



arness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

;!bnrt S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
18 E. Davie Street Raleigh N. C. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 

President. Treasurer. 

G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BUSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



He met her in the meadow 
As the sun was sinking low; 

They walked along together 
In the twilight's afterglow; 

She waited while gallantly 
He lowered all the bars, 



Her soft eyes bent upon him, 

As radiant as the stars. 
She neither smiled nor thanked him, 

For indeed she knew not how; 
He was just a farmer's lad, 

And she a Jersey cow. — Ex. 



I. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
The Wake Drng- Store. Phones 228 



HICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE 
Prompt Delivery 



Phones 107 



Jolly 



& Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 
MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 



BRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 



DARNELL & THOMAS 



MUSIC HOUSE 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
W. Hargett Street 



Phone 619 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS. Raleigh, N. C- 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser 
vice and value. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 
222 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, ST. C. 

WHITE ICE CREAM CO 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 1 23 COR. SALISBURY AND HARG ETT ST 



There was a fair maid of St. Mary's, 
With a voice like a golden canary's; 
She made such a noise 
That the A. and M. boys 
In alarm fled away to the prairies. 



Norfolk Southern Railroac 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



w. w. CROXTON, 

Traffic Managrer, NORFOLK, VA. 



W. TJPCHTJRCH, 

General Ag-ent, RALEIGH, N. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

oses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

ioral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

ICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th St?., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Claps pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades 

perry's \ri' store 

S. Wilmingrton Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solic ted 

THE MECHANICS SAVING BANK 

RALEIGH, NT. C 



CALENDAR 



November. 



lovember 18. 

rovember 23. 
rovember 25. 
lovember 28. 
lovember 30. 
)ecember 2. 
)ecember 7. 



William Jennings Bryan's talk in Auditorium. 

Musical Concert at Meredith College. 

Miss Fenner's Talk in Muse Room. 

Basketball Match between Sigma and Mu Athletic Associations. 

Thanksgiving Day. Holiday. 

Children's Play in Auditorium. 

Peace-St. Mary's Concert. 

"The Dress Rehearsal." 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

II Our Work Done by The Goodyear Welt System 

104 E. H»rgrett (street 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's DryCleaning Establishmen 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury Street 



HE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A. & M. 
Athletic Association. $1.50 per year. Walter 
C. Taylor, Bus. Mg r., We st Raleigh, N. G. 

— mrs7 frankTredford 

3 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 



TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishings 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 

Personal attention to mail orders. Bell Phone 438 



BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST DRY GOOD STORE 

Come and See Us in Our New Home 

Everything: for Woman's Wear. Reatly-to-Wear Garments of all Kinds 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



71st ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 19, 1912. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 1913. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ ®> THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these \ #• THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: j ^ THE ART SCHOOL. 

\ 5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to tin 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



^ije 



ftt jWarp's jltluge 



January, 1013 




fcaletsk Jfc C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

NEW YEAR NUMBER 
OL. XVI.X January, 1913. No. 4 

A Christmas Poem 



Emilie W. McVea. 



Long ago, as the legends tell, 

Came wise men from afar, 
Led onward by the mystic spell 

That lay in the gleam of a star. 

star that gleamed in Bethlehem, 
Brighten our darkness today. 

The angel choirs in radiant light, 
Hymned high their holy strain; 

The shepherds, roused by the vision bright, 
Gave back the song again. 

O angel choir, vision bright, 
Visit our earth today. 

They found the King, the King most blest, 

A child in a manger stall; 
Jesus, asleep on Mary's breast, 

Tender, and weak, and small. 

O little child, O child of God, 
Come to our hearts today. 
Christmas, 1912. 



72 The St. Mary's Muse. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



AMY CONYERS WINSTON and JULIA WASHINGTON ALLEN, Editors. 



What the New Year Brought 



Elizabeth Atkinson Lay. 

It was a still cold night. Above the stars shone clearly and in t 
streets every light was ablaze, for was not this New Year's Eve, ai 
did it not become every one to welcome in the New Year ? And 3 
in one house all was still, the white gowned nurse slipped quietly 
and out and the doctor leaned silently over the little crib as he watch 
his patient. For five days little Ted, his parents' three-year-old d; 
ling, had been tossing in delirium, his tangled curls lying in a brig 
mass on the pillows, his eyes glittering feverishly. And now, n( 
was the turning point for good or for bad, and, while all around t 
world was preparing to welcome in the New Year, the little life hu 
in the balance undetermined whether to make it a year of joy 
sorrow in the hearts of the father and mother who stood by the bed. 

Now clear and sweet rang out the chimes and all at once panden 
nium broke forth. Never had the tooting of horns, the beating 
drums, and the snap of fire crackers seemed so loud to the sile 
watchers within. Yet above it all mounted the sound of the chim 
till the very stars seemed to echo it back through the night. Th< 
listened and oh! wonderful! the watchful eyes of the mother saw t 
baby's eyes open and she bent low to catch the words "Sing, muwei 
then she started his favorite lullaby. Faintly at first then clearer t 
sweet tones came as she sang over again the dearly loved refrain, 

"Sail, baby, sail, 

Out upon that sea, 

Only don't forget to sail 

Back again to me." 

The brave voice faltered and broke for hadn't he promised her n 
long ago that he would always come back ? He had raised his bli 



The St. Mary's Muse. . 73 



es and promised, though only in fun, that he would "never fordet" 
I he shook his curly head. And now would he ? 

I "Muwer, I fordot to say my prayers." 

II "Hush, I'll say them— 

"Now I lay me down to sleep. 
I pray the Lord my soul to keep 
If I should die before I wake, 
I pray Thee, Lord, my soul to take." 

Look, the golden curls are still, the tired eyes are shut, the little 

mds cling to the mother's fingers in sleeps — or was it death ? 
4 The doctor leaned over the crib. 

"Thank God, he is safe." 

"Amen," whispered the mother. 

And so this IsTew Year brought them not sorrow and pain and a 
,'eat void in their lives, but gladness and joy, and, above all, thanks- 

ving. 



A Sunset on the Prairies 

(A Travel Sketch.) 



Frances Seaes. 

When the sun is setting and turning the heavens to gold it is not 
^nmediately morning in China as we all thought when we were chil- 
dren, but it is late afternoon in sunny Texas. What is more beautiful 
ftian the sun-set twilight and after-glow on the Texas prairies ? ISToth- 
:ig! Only those who have seen it can fully appreciate its beauties. 
: is more like a sun-set on the water than anything. As far as eye 
m reach the flat, grass-covered ground. ISTo hills or even trees to 
reak the clear line of the horizon. The grass at your feet is short 
■ad. tough while growing among it are the dear little Texas blue- 
3nnets, which remind one of bits of blue sky. 

As the sun now sinks lower the whole heavens are turned to gold. 
!ven in the east the lights are shown by the lavendar tints that are 
3nected upon the blue sky and white, billowy clouds. Lower and lower 



74 The St. Mary's Muse, 



the sun drops ; everything is still, for you are perhaps alone, and if yd 
are not every one stands in awe when such of God's beauties are show 
Twilight conies, and with it the soft breezes from the peaceful Gul 
You are startled perhaps by a prarie dog that suddenly runs throuj 
the grass. Then darkness comes. The lonely darkness of the fl; 
country ! The indigo heavens and the million stars are shown, 
coyote yells ! You perhaps shiver with the awful beauty of it a] 
Quiet again, and the stars still twinkle softly above. You are alot 
oil the vast prarie, the stars above you, and the blue-bonnets at yoi 
feet. 



Just Any Winter Morning 

( An Everyday Sketch.) 



Julia Washington Allen. 

"Oh the bell, bell, bell, 
Hear it clang and crash and roar, 
What a horror does outpour 
On the bosom of the palpitating air." 

We will have to apologize to Poe, but this is exactly the way th 
rising bell sounds when its never failing peals disturb the blissfi 
dreams of the St. Mary's girls at the "absolutely unearthly" hour o 
seven. The catalogue does not know how wrong it is when it states i 
flaring letters that the girls rise at seven o'clock, and have breakfas 
at seven thirty. It never occurs to any one to get up when the risin 
bell rings. Then you just yell to your roommate, "Wake up ! Th 
bell's rung and it's your morning to pull down the window," and sooi 
a sleepy voice cries "It's not, you know I put it down yesterday — o 
why did you wake me up ?" Then you both turn over for just one mor 
nap, and quiet reigns at St. Mary's for about a quarter of an hou 
longer. Then sleepy heads are popped out of doors with cries o1 
"What time is it?" "How long since the bell rang?" "Oh, I'm s 
sleepy I can't get up." From then until seven thirty the St. Mary' 
girl works harder than any other time, trying to do in ten minute 
what it takes an hour at home to do. There are mad cries of "Please! 



The St. Mary's Muse. 75 

jijpive me the shoe-buttoner." "0 dear — what am I going to do ? There 
JL not a single hairpin in this room. "Oh, there goes the bell. 
il,, 'lease button my dress." "I dont know where my hair ribbon is." 
,iOh I know I'm not going to get there, and I've been late twice this 
reek already." 

A mad rush for the dining room follows the ringing of the bell, and 
jhen the doors are closed, shutting out those who were just too sleepy to 
( et up. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



ELLEN ARMISTEAD JOHNSON and ELIZABETH ANDERSON TARRY, Editors. 



December 10 

On the night before the anniversary of the death of Jefferson Davis 
in inter-society meeting was held in the parlor in his honor. Bessie 
White, president of E. A. P., presided and Matilda Hancock read a 
/ery interesting article on his life during the war ; Ellen A. John- 
son ( a short article on his life during the war, and Miss Katie McKim- 
non a delightful account of his life. Following that "Tenting 
on the Old Camp Ground," was sung, and the meeting was closed 
with "Dixie." Every one was very much interested in what Miss Katie 
;aad to say especially as Jefferson Davis' family found refuge in St. 
Mary's during the war. The following was taken from her paper: 

D 

Madam President, Friends: 

Having been asked to speak of President Davis' life after the surren- 
der, I will begin by saying that, for two years he was confined for 
"treason and conspiracy" at Portress Monroe. Here he was sub- 
jected to treatment of which no government could be proud. He 
begged for a trial at the hands of his captors, but that was denied him. 
He was finally released because his health failed so rapidly from the 
confinement that physicians thought his life was in danger. 

The State of Mississippi then offered him and his family a home 



76 The St. Mary's Muse. 



and later wished to send him again to the United States Senate which 
honor he refused. He spent the remaining years of his life at Beanvoir, 

In the year 1878, Mr. Davis began his book, "The Rise and Fall oi 
the Confederacy," completing it in three years. 

As all his papers were lost, the history of the Confederacy was 
unwritten save by the deeds of its defenders. He therefore decided 
to give an account of his administration and the grounds of his faith 

He died at Beauvoir on the eleventh of December 1892 and was 
greatly mourned by his comrades. 



December 14 

"Mice and Men," a comedy in four acts, by Madeline Ryley, was pre- 
sented by the Dramatic Club on Saturday evening, December four- 
teenth, in the auditorium. 

The scene of the play is laid in England in the latter part of the 
eighteenth century. The costumes were effective and the settings 
attractive, especially the garden scene in the last act. 

The members of the cast acquitted themselves with great credit, and 
the highest praise is due to Miss Davis, under whose efficient direction 
the play was presented. 

Elizabeth Tarry as "Peggy" was irresistible, and demonstrated 
anew her histrionic ability. In the more difficult scenes with Lovell 
she showed genuine dramatic power. 

Gertrude Brigham, as Captain Lovell, sustained a difficult part effect- 
ively. The climax of the third act was almost entirely free from 
amateurishness, and both Gertrude Brigham and Elizabeth Tarry 
showed an intense appreciation of the lines and held the situation most 
admirably. 

Elizabeth Carrison, as Mark Embury, and Buford Aiken, as Roger 
Goodlake, deserve special mention and praise for the skillful way in 
which they held their characters. 

The play as a whole was delightful and proved that the Dramatic 



The St. Mary's Muse. 77 

Club is a potent factor in the life of St. Mary's. The characters were 
cast as follows : 

Mark Embury (a scholar, scientist, and philosopher) Elizabeth Cabbison 

Roger Goodlake (his friend and neighbor) Bufobd Aiken 

Captain George Lovell (his nephew) Gebtetjde Brigham 

Sir Henry Trimblestone Lois Pugh 

Kit Barniger (a fiddler and a professor of deportment) Agnes Reese 

Peter (Embury's servant) Virginia Bonner 

Joanna Goodlake (wife of Goodlake) Peances Walkeb 

Mrs. Deborah (Embury's housekeeper) Eleanoe Hill 

Peggy ("Little Britain") Elizabeth Taeey 

Matron (of the Foundling Hospital) Vibginia Sheeman 

Janet Boone 
Lauba Clabk 
Julia Coopeb 
Maey Geant 
Mary Smith 
Penelope Gallup 
Molly (a maid) . . . .Lizzie Winston 

Place — Old Homestead. Period — About 1786. 



Orphans 



December 16 

On the afternoon of December 16, a very delightful organ recital 
was given in the chapel, Marguerite Blakely assisting. The following 
being the program : 

Prelude and Fugue in B flat Bach 

Miss Julia Cooper. 

Largetto Steinert 

Miss Louise Stephenson. 

They That Sow in Tears Rogers 

Miss Marguerite Blakely. 

Scherzoso Rheinberg 

Miss Elizabeth Tabby. 

Noel Buck 

Miss Susan Rawlings. 

There were shepherds abiding in the field, 
Keeping watch over their flocks by night. 



78 The St. Mary's Muse. 



December 16 

When the girls who had taken part in "The Dress Kehearsal," and 
"Mice and Men" gathered in the Muse room on the night of December 
the sixteenth by the invitation of Mr. and Mrs. Cruikskank and the 
Muse Club, they were greatly surprised to find that the prosaic room had 
been transformed into a Christmas bower. From the chandeliers were 
festoons of silver strung with tiny red bells while large bells were hung 
under each light; the walls had a frieze of Christmas stockings over- 
flowing with holly, placed over the green burlap. In every available 
corner was placed holly and poinsettia and in every possible way the 
Christmas color scheme was carried out. Hot chocolate and delicious 
sandwiches were served and when the the half past nine bell rang the | 
girls left reluctantly and afterward voted that this had been the nicest 
party of the year. E. A. J. 



December 19— The Christmas Tree 

The Christmas tree at St. Mary's! Ah, who would miss that most 
thrilling night of the whole year, the night before we "go home." The 
Christmas tree is always a most joyous and exciting time. And this 
year it proved no exception to the rule, far from it! 

All day long the very air seemed laden with excitement. We could 
hardly wait for eight o'clock to go to the "gym," for there the tree was 
to be. How we longed for the time to come and when at last it did, the 
whole school rushed there and found a transformed gymnasium. 
x\round the walls were hung large ropes of cedar, while from a beautiful 
red bell high in the center of the ceiling ran festoons of red crepe paper 
to the cedar. At one end was a small stage banked on each side with 
holly and cedar; and in the center of the room — oh, a sight to make 
one hold his breath with delight! — was the Christmas tree, the largest 
and most beautiful tree with many glittering decorations and nu 
merous lighted candles. "Oh ! isn't it beautiful ?" "Oh ! isn't it won 
derful ?" was heard from all parts of the room. 

But listen ! From afar is heard a faint sound of singing — nearer j 
and nearer it comes, and then through the side door a dozen or more 



The St. Mary's Muse. 79. 



yirls dressed in white, singing a Christmas carol. When they had 
finished the little children sang another carol. Then the crowd gath- 
ered around the stage to see "Experience," a delightful musical dialogue 
; ] in which Jennie Belle Boyden and Marguerite Blakely and Amy 
Winston took part. After that Elizabeth Tarry recited the familiar 
; 'JSTight Before Christmas/'and then with a loud blowing of horns 
entered old Santa with his elves. He had a bag full of presents in the 
•form of "knocks" and hits which he read out, to the amusement of all. 
After the special hits, Santa, with the assistance of some of the Muse 
; Club girls, gave out the general hits. Each girl getting some hit — 
'for example some got mirrors, others boy dolls and jack-in-the-boxes and 
several anti-fat. After the presents were distributed candy was passed 
around and it was with regret that, after singing "O Little Town oi 
'Bethlehem" and "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear," we left the 
gymnasium. But the Christmas Spirit lingered with us still and 
through our minds ran the old familiar words that recalled our child- 
hood, "Merry Christmas to all and to all a good night." 

M.McC. 



December 20 — January 7— Christmas Holidays 

There were a few people who spent their holidays here at school. 
Besides the Rector and his family and Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank, those 
'remaining here were Mile. Rudnieka, Miss Graves, Miss Bottum, Fran- 
ces Sears, Elise Stiles, Josephine Wilson, and for a while Miss Davis, 
Gertrude Cornish and Mary Vose were here for a part of the time. 
The general Christmas excitement prevailed and although Miss Graves 
was ill for a few days we had many lovely experiences. 

The old Latin room was transformed to a beautiful Christmas bower 
with holly, pine and poinsettias, while trimmed Christmas trees stood 
in the corners. It was here that we found our presents, and I don't 
suppose that we will ever forget the joy of being able to go to meals 
'at St. Mary's without paying any attention to bells. 

There were several games of tennis, and once two young ladies played 
straight through breakfast and then ate their morning meal in the 



80 The St. Mart's Muse. 



kitchen. There were some very good plays at the Academy of Mus 
and so matinee and theatre parties were enjoyed. 

Christmas morning everybody went to church but contrary as it mi 
seem to St. Mary's there was no chapel, night and morning. 

Although we had enjoyed it thoroughly we were indeed glad to gre 
the girls when they returned from their respective homes. 

F. S. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



SUSIE McIVER and LAURA MARGARET HOPPE, Editors, 



Lyde Palmer has had a visit from her sister. 

Myrtle Warren had a visit from her brother recently. 

Virginia Sherman's father and mother have been to see her. 

Sallie Bet Quinerly's brother was here to see her in December 

Mary Franklin Graves and Julia Bond have had visits from the 
fathers. 

Helen Daniels and Blair Rawlings were here for a few days wi 
Susan Rawlings, early in December. 

Helen Hartridge, Gertrude Brigham, and Elizabeth Gold have h; 
visits from their mothers during December. 

Mary Lamb (1911-12) came up from Henderson on the 14th to s 
"Mice and Men," spending several days with Elizabeth Tarry. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wright, after a visit of a few days with Martha ai 
Helen, took Martha home with them for a short stay on account of h 
health. 

Annie Belle Williams went home several days before the holida 
to be brides-maid at the wedding of Miss Rosalie Williams, a form 
music teacher at St. Mary's. 

Thursday afternoon, December 18th, Amy Winston delightful 
entertained a few of her St. Mary's friends with a charming party 
her beautiful home on Blount St. The first part of the afternoon t] 
girls enjoyed singing, music and chatting after which delightful refres 



The St. Mary's Muse. 81 



Ii- 



,ents were served. These consisted of a salad course and dainty ices. 
ihen rugs were removed and dancing enjoyed. Those present were 
aroline Jones, Evelyn Maxwell, Mary Butler, Frances Strong, Julia 
ooper, Mae London, Lynne Grayson, Gertrude Brigham, Agnes 
>eese, Jennie Belle Boyden, Margaret McGary, Mary Bryan Griswold, 
aura Margaret Hoppe, Mary Franklin Graves, Louise Durkee, Mar- 
aerite Blakely, Winnie Rogers, Placide Clark, Elizabeth Tarry, Mary 
k>rtch, Helen Hartridge , Susan Rawlings, Lina Lockhart, Lanie 
[ales, Janie Hunt, Tallulah de Rosset, and Katharine Bunn. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN 



Bereaved 

However useless to repine, 

I feel, in sooth, I must bemoan thee! 
I used to love to think thee mine; 

Now I, alas! no longer own thee! 

Pull many a week thou'st graced my hall! 

Pull many a walk we've had together! 
No tempest daunted thee at all! 

Thou seemed'st at home in stormiest weather! 

I always held thee in respect, 

Nay, more — regarded thee with rapture! 

None, from my manner might detect 
That thou wast only mine by capture! 

Yes, long ago I captured thee; 

The mem'ry of it does not shame me — 
When all thy many charms they see, 

I think, indeed, few men will blame me. 

Yet now, behold, this is the end! 

Thou, with another man, hast left me! 
I trusted fondly in a friend, 

And he, most foully, has bereft me! 

I doubt I ne'er shall see thee more; 

So long it seems since we were parted — 
Evanished with my friend of yore, 

Thou'st left me well nigh broken hearted! 



82 The St. Mary's Mtjse. 

Yet, recognizing thou art lost, 

I'll cast away this idle sorrow; 
And, knowing what umbrellas cost, 

Will seek another one to borrow. 

— George B. Norwood, in New York Times. 



Y Y Y Man 

There is a farmer who is Y Y 

Enough to take his E E, 
And study nature with his I I, 

And think of what he C C; 
He hears the chatter of the J J 

As they each other T T, 
And sees that when a tree D K K 

It makes a home for B B. 
A yoke of oxen he will U U, 

With many haws and G G, 
And their mistakes he will X Q Q 

When plowing for his P P. 
He little buys, but much he sells, 

And therefore little 0; 
And when he hoes his soil by spells, 

He also soils his hose. 

— Sam Loyd, in Woman's Home Companion. 



Anticipation and Reaiization 
To sit and dream in study hall 
Of young men short and young men tall — 

That's expectation. 

To stand before the glass so long, 
With powder puff and curling tong — 
That's preparation. 

To go downstairs so nice and sweet, 
And tall young men and short ones meet — 
That's presentation. 

To listen to one's love for you 
In a corner seat just made for two — 
That's revelation. 

To hear in the midst of his tale so sweet 
A clanging bell and approaching feet — 
That's disturbation. 

To just talk on, in spite of the bell, 
And have a teacher toll your knell — 
That's tribulation. 

— E. 8., '08, in The Seminary Blue Book. 



The St. Mary f s Muse. 



Subscription, One Year = = = * One Dollar. 

Single Copies = ■ = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumna, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1912-1913. 

Caroline Clarke Jones, Editor-in-Chief. 

Julia Washington Allen, Mary Brown Butler, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Ellen Armistead Johnson, Susie McIver, Elise Gordon Stiles, 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry, Amy Conyers Winston. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, Business Manager. 

Myrtle Warren, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



Welcome to all of you. We hope that jour holidays were wonder- 
ful; that you had "the time of your lives," and that Santa Claus was 
very good to you. We are glad to see all of you back again and wish to 
i extend our heariest greetings to the new girls who have just entered 
since the holidays. 



January I 



Each year we all make new year resolutions and on the first day of 
January we carry them out to the letter. But do we remember them 
after that? I am afraid that the majority of us forget in a. week's 
time that we ever made any new year's resolutions and get right back 
again into the same old ruts. Don't you think that we all make too 
many resolutions ? Each year we make about a dozen and think, yes, 
think honestly, that we will be able to carry them out. But do we ? 
No, and I think the reason is that we make too many and after we 
break one we feel that somehow it doesn't make much difference if we 
break the rest. Let us try this year and make only one, yes, just one 
resolution, and then we will be able to carry it out and profit by our 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



doing so. For is it not better to make one resolution and keep it than 
to make a dozen and break them all ? 



The Annual Muse 



Now that the holidays are over and the editors of the Annual Muse 
are busy collecting money and getting subscriptions to the Muse, 
girls at St. Mary's now, and also Alumnge, please do all you can to 
help get out the Muse. We want the best Muse that has ever been 
gotten out and so do you. So if you all do your part we can accomplish 
it. But without your help we are lost. We all want a Muse and we 
want the very, very best. 



1912 Christmas Greeting 



This Season brings with it the message of Peace 

To the earth and of Good "Will to men; 
Not one is forgotten, for God loves us all; 
Not one is too poor, no fortune's too small, 

To give richly by loving again. 

So at Christmas I think of you all, and I send 

This reminder of Love's Jubilee, 
With a prayer for all blessings that come from above, 
Fond memory's tribute to those that I love, 
And the friends that, I trust, love me. 
St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. G. George "W. Lay. 

Christmas, 1912. 

This was the Christmas greeting composed by the Rector, and sent 
out by him to all girls now at St. Mary's, and who have been students 
here since he has been Rector, and other friends of the school. These 
lines appeared on the second sheet of a leaflet, the outside of which was 
decorated with a beautiful embossed design showing the St. Mary's seal 
and little conventional holly trees. The whole made a most attractive 
card, and one which in both thought and beauty was greatly appreciated. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 85 



The New Girls 



All of us are glad to welcome the "new girls" who are with us since 
iristmas — Kate Leake, of Wadesboro; Julia Caroline Blount, of Pen- 
sola ; Bernice Wright, of Gibson, 1ST. C. ; Mary Holton, Winston- 
lem, and Louise Elliot, of Brunswick, Ga. Of these five, Kate 
ake and Mary Holton were here part of last year ; Ada French, who 
't in November, on account of her health, is also back for the new 
m. 



"St. Mary's Pullmans' 



It will probably be of interest to St. Mary's friends to know that at 
3 Christmas vacation this year, the school despatched three Pullman 
pecial" cars, entirely filled with St. Mary's girls. One of these cars 
is sent direct from Raleigh to New York, and was open at ten o'clock, 
as saving the long wait for the midnight northbound train ; the 
;ond car was for Savannah and Jacksonville, and the last for eastern 
irolina and Norfolk. Besides the interest attached to this unusual 
ndition, it was a great convenience to the girls and to the school. 



Mr. and Mrs. Thadius Allen 

will give in marriage their daughter 

Hattie Belle 

to 

Mr. William Smith 

on Thursday evening, December the nineteenth 

nineteen hundred and twelve 

at nine o'clock 

at their residence 

West Raleigh, North Carolina 

Reception 

le-thirty to eleven 

St. Mary's girls for many years have known Cornelia Allen, the 
)ucky," of the honied tongue, and the many friends. "Hattie Belle," 
Ducky's daughter, and "William Smith" is the same Will who for 
r e or six years until last year was well known at St. Mary's, espe- 
ally in his daily trips for the mail. 



86 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Death of Jennie Ford 



On Monday, January 6, there passed away at St. Agnes' hospital 
Jennie Ford, a faithful and devoted servant of the old sort to whom the 
"white folks" owe so much. She was in her 73d year and during hei 
long life had won the respect and affection of many people of both races 
Especially is her loss felt by the family of the Rector of St. Mary's 
School, to whom she had rendered faithful and loving service ever since 
their home has been in Raleigh. After a life of close and constant de 
votion to her heavenly Master, she was ready, as she was willing, tc 
enter his nearer service. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumme Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - -< Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President - Mrs. R. W. Winston, Raleigh. 

Vice-President - Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

Secretary - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 
it,x,t^ o^m^.^.r. f Miss Anna N. Butxon, Winston-Salem. 

Field Secretaries - - | Miss Annie Root, Raleigh. 



ALUMNAE NOTES 



A Tribute From an Old St. Mary's Girl to the St. Mary's of 

the Present Day 



By Mrs. Aiken. 

In 1852 I left St. Mary's, then a girl of sixteen summers. En route 
? rom New York a little more than a month ago, after a lapse of sixty- 
me years, I stopped over in Raleigh, to visit the beloved "Alma. Mater," 
vhere a grandchild is now being educated. Arriving in Raleigh late 
Saturday afternoon my daughter, also a former pupil of St. Mary's 
md myself refreshed ourselves at our hotel, then went directly to the 
school. When I found myself beneath the Arcadian shades of the 
>rove, to me fragrant with memories of four happy years of schoolgirl 
ife, my heart thrilled with pleasure ; then, upon entering the parlor 
!(>f the main building a bevy of young girls gathered about me, friends 
)f my granddaughter, some proving to be descendants of my own old 
friends ; in my enthusiasm over these bright surroundings I fear 1 
forgot the dignity of an old lady of nearly seventy-seven years. Upon 
looking around this room I saw in their old places the full length 
portraits of Bishops Ravenscroft and Ives, the former having confirmed 
my mother, the latter myself. Then I was deeply touched as my eyes 
rested upon the portraits of Dr. Aldert Smedes, our much beloved first 
Principal of St. Mary's, over one mantel, and over the other his son 
and successor, Dr. Bennett Smedes, whom I knew intimately as a boy. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The very name of "Smedes" bears with it many cherished recollec- 
tions. The next day being Sunday we attended both Chapel services; 
and I being the only survivor of four sisters who had been pupils of 
St. Mary's, one of whom was my classmate and companion during our 
entire course, I felt as if angel voices joined in the prayers and praises 
which arose from this sacred sanctuary. In the evening we were 
charmingly entertained at the Rectory by the present Rector and Prin- 
cipal, Rev. Mr. Lay, and his lovely wife, meeting also two of the young 
daughters. From this nest of domestic felicity I think there must 
extend a sweet "home influence" over the entire school. I judge from 
my short acquaintance with Mr. Lay that he is gentle and lenient to 
the natural mistakes or foibles of youth; stern, but just when a prin- 
ciple is involved or a duty willfully neglected; hence, under his admin- 
istration the honor and reputation of St. Mary's is, I am sure, in most 
capable hands. 

Now, what of St. Mary's ? I found her flourishing like a "green 
bay tree," extending her branches, progressive in the departments of 
study and art, that she may more thoroughly cultivate and tenderly care 
for, as a fostering mother, those who come to her. She is indeed an 
inspiration and power in the land, having sent forth from her shelter- 
ing walls since her organization in 1842, hundreds, yes, thousands of 
girls, from almost every State in the Union, to fulfill their missions in 
life, as daughters, sisters, wives, and mothers. In this latter capacity, 
by their gentle admonitions and guidance, rearing their sons, the men 
of future generations, to be the wise leaders and upholders of our 
government. 'Tis usually the refined mother who strikes the keynote 
to the strain of lofty ideals and duty, which convert the man into the 
gentleman. 

"Man is the nobler growth our realms supply," but "Woman ! lovely 
woman! nature made thee to temper man," so these girls with minds 
and hearts intellectually and spiritually trained, thus carry out the 
destiny of perfect womanhood. May every pupil of this school realize 
that it is a Godgiven privilege to be known as a St. Mary's girl. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 89 



Alumnae Weddings 



Spru ill— Richards 
On December 18th, Miss Christine Richards, of Gainesville, Florida, and Mr. 
J. A. Spruill, of Jacksonville, Florida, were married at the bride's home. 



Kenan— l^enan 

Mrs. William Rand Kenan 

has the honor of 

announcing the marriage of her daughter 

Sarah 

to 

Mr. Graham Kenan 

on Wednesday, the eighteenth of December 

one thousand nine hundred and twelve 

at Wilmington, North Carolina 



Lee— Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Harmon Ayres Miller 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Virginia Griffith 

to 

Mr. Luria Lyons Lee 

on the evening of Thursday, the twenty-sixth of December 

one thousand nine hundred and twelve 

at half after eight o'clock 

at Trinity Church 
Asheville, North Carolina 



rlamer— Du Bose 

Dr. and Mrs. Theodore Marion DuBose 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Jane Porcher 

to 

Mr. Robert Cochrane Hamer 

Thursday evening, January the ninth 

at eight o'clock 

Trinity Church 

Columbia, South Carolina 

The card above is of more than usual interest to St. Mary's girls of 
the last six years, for Janie DuBose is one of the girls that will always 
be remembered by all that knew her here. She is the sort of girl that 



90 The St. Maey's Muse. 



"stands out," by reason of her work as a student, by her influence! 
always for good, and by her charm. 

She was a student here from 1907 to 1910, receiving an EnglisI 
Certificate here last year, and helping win the Sigma Lambda debate 
On her account we were more than ready to welcome her sister Beverly 
who came the next year, and was with us two years. The Muse offer 
its heartiest congratulations to Mr. Hamer, and the best of wishes fo 
both. 



icif 
idv 



White-Ward 

Mr. Charles Johnson Ward 

requests the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of his daughter 

Grace Martin 

to 

Mr. Robert Bruce White 

on Wednesday the fifteenth of January 

one thousand nine hundred and thirteen 

at high noon 

Baptist Church 

Franklinton, North Carolina 



«r 



Myers— Springs 

Mr. and Mrs. Brevard Davidson Springs 

request the pleasure of your company 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Marguerite Clarkson 

to 

Mr. Richard Austin Myers 

on Wednesday evening, January the twenty-ninth 

at eight o'clock 

One thousand nine hundred and twelve, South Boulevard 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



Mayo— Rogers 

Mr. J. Rowan Rogers 

requests the pleasure of your company at the 

marriage of his daughter 

Narcissia Gray 

to 

Mr. Howard Anderson Mayo 

on Thursday evening, January the thirtieth 

nineteen hundred and thirteen 

at six o'clock 

Christ Church 

Raleigh North Carolina 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
ders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
nciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
;ir loss, not ours. 



eigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 
ReadytO'Wear Garments 
Ten per cent off to College Girls. 



^■evaxxxit^ 




Exclusive 



| Millinery 



Teacher cranky, 

Pupils few, 
Questions flying, 

Zero too. 
What's the matter? 

Don't you know? 
Tuesday morning, 

Always so. 



HE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 



ulored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

ADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



' It's worth the difference ' 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements. 


St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 


THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPAN 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 

COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

WE SELL GOSSARD'S LACE 

FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 


Established 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 


JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO 


COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 


RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 


122 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONED 


The Same Old Story- 
There was a man in our town 

Who wasn't very wise; 
He said, "To keep expenses down, 

I will not advertise." 

But when he saw the people pass 
His place without a look, 

He said, "I guess I am an ass, 
Who ought to get the hook." 


Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 


J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


The 
MOST POPULAR? 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICi 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mi 


Ask the Girls 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 


HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Snoes. 
2 



Advertisements. 



Jollege GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

tie OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 

and Power 

f 174 
Both Phones :< 2 o6 



OLLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Special 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 

jat Suits, School Dresses, Evening- Costumes, 'Waists, Coats, and Accessory Lines 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trimming's, Gloves, Hosiery, Daces, Notions, Etc. 



IcKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. 



Fayetteville St. 



C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds oi Keys Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 



At once he took a page, no less, 
Within The Muse— it's true — 

And since that page was sent to press, 
Has all that he can do. 



KING'S GROCERY 
"The Little Store" 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 



1! RIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day- 
Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 


HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE I 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Street 


ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 


Good Things Always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 

124 Fayetteville Street 


ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY ,„ 

RALEIGH, N. C. " 

Home Company. Home Capital 
Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 

President. Treasurer. 
G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BUSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 


Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 
CARVER'S STABLES 

Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
1 18 E. Davie Street Raleigh N. C 


HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C 


A Sailor's Epitaph 

This sailor shook the mortal coil 

Amid the tempest's roar, 

For what he took for alcohol 

Was H„ S 0.. 
2 4 


M. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 


MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engravei 

Send for samples and prices 

EDWARDS S BROUGHTON PRINTING GO 

Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


WILMINGTON <fc HARGETT STS. 



Advertisements. 



! HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
!?he Wake Drugr Store. Phones 228 



fl ,ilCKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE Phones 107 

Prompt Delivery 



Jolly £r Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 
MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 



PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 



RIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 



-i DARNELL & THOMAS 



MUSIC HOUSE 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
15 S. Harrington Street Phone 941 M 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything In Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

J. R. FERRALL <fc CO.— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 
222 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 

WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 COR. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS 



We may live without poetry, music and art; 
We may live without conscience, and live without heart; 
We may live without friends, we may live without fads, 
But The Muse, to be sure, can not live without ADS! 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



w. w. CROXTON, 

Traffic Managrer, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. UPCHURCH, 

General A&ent, RALEIGH, N. C . 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C' Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and' 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the' 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DES10. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades 

perry's \k v store 

S. Wilmington Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVING BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Calendar for December-January 



December 7. 
December 9. 
December 10. 
December 11. 
December 14. 
December 15. 

December 19. 
December 20. 
January 7. 
January 8. 
Jan. 23-25. 



Mrs. Lay's party to Junior Class. 

Second Mu-Sigma basket ball game. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank At Home to Faculty. 

Second afternoon reception by Faculty in parlor. 

"Mice and Men" by Dramatic Club. 

Party for Sigbt Singing Class and Dramatic Club, given by Muse 

Club. 
Christmas tree and entertainment in Gymnasium. 
Christmas vacation begins. 
Girls return to School. 
Beginning of school work. 
Mid-year examinations. 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

Ail Our Work Done by The Goodyear Welt System 
104 E. Hargett Street 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O' Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury Street 



THE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A. & M. 
Athletic Association. $1-50 per year. Walter 
C. Taylor, Bu s. Mgr., West Raleigh, N. C^ 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD~ 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 



TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishings 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 

Personal attention to mail orders. Bell Phone 438 



BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST DRY GOOD STORE 

Come and See Us in Our New Home 

Everything- for Woman's Wear. Ready-to -Wear Garments of all Kinds 



Advertisements 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to All Points 

NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities; through Tourist 
Cars to San Francisco and other California points. All- 
year Tourist tickets on sale to principal Western points. 
Convenient local, as well as through trains. Electrically 
lighted coaches. Complete Dining Car Service on all 
through trains. Ask representatives of Southern Railway 
about special rates account Christmas holidays; also various 
other special occasions. If you are contemplating a trip to 
any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. 
They will gladly and courteously furnish you with all infor- 
mation as to the cheapest and most comfortable way in 
which to make the trip. Will also be glad to secure PulU 
man Sleeping Car reservations for you. 

H. F. GARY, General Passenger Agent, J. O. JONES, Traveling Passenger Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



%%t 



g>t jWarp's Jffluse 



Jfetararp, 1013 




fcaletsl), Ji C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

LENTEN NUMBER 
r 0L. XVIX February, 1913. No, 5 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



MARY BROWN BUTLER and JULIA WASHINGTON ALLEN, Editors 



Good Resolutions Still 



Oh, yes, with purpose high and strong 
To do the right and shun the wrong, 
We'll meet this present year! 
Yes, meet it with brave hearts and true, 
And what before us lies we'll do, 
Without a doubt or fear! 

And when the reckoning all is done 

And we our latest race have run, 

And Watchman, standing on the height, 

Is asked to tell "what of the night?" 

Oh, may he give the glad reply 

The "morning cometh," with clear sky! 

E. AND M. BUTLEB. 



Y\e Who Laugh's Last 



Annie Cameron. 

"Can't we go ?" "Why ?" "What did he say ?" "Did you catch it ?" 
Was he mad?" These questions with several others met Bill as he 
ushed past the five eager hoys that crowded the doorway. 

"Mad! no, hut he just put his foot down on it from the very begin- 
ing, but what could you expect of old Reddy. He's a regular old 
rab !" 



92 The St. Mary's Muse. 

"Yes," said Jim perching himself on the foot of the bed, "and h s 
been down on us for some time. Do you remember that time' abcl 
the chickens ? And then the apples ! He's got his eye on us, surJ 

"Well, then," said Bob lying back luxuriously against the pillow, fl 
he's SO' sure we're up to something let's don't disappoint him. W1I 
do you say to a trick on Reddy ?" 

The council of war that followed appeared to be entirely satisf actcp 
and the meeting broke up with many hearty exclamations of "F ig 
o'clock?" "Fine and dandy!" "We'll be there!" "Don't forgetf 
"Good-bye." 

Little did they know that outside the door some one else determrdl 
to be there at five o'clock. 

It was hardly good daylight when five shivering figures made thl 
way stealthily past Prof. Redwing's house and down the road in 4 
direction of his stables. At the carriage-house they stopped. 

"Well, here we are at last," said Jim "Wow ! but it's cold ! Wheil 
Bob ? Confound that boy he's too lazy for — . Well here you are 11 
last. You know the place. Where does he keep the carriage, 
closed one? Oh— there it is. Here, Jack, you and Bob and Bill am 
Tom take the shafts and Pete and I'll push. Heave ho ! my ladl 
Yank out the old omnibus!" There was a tense moment of tugg;I 
then the carriage rolled slowly from under the shed. Once in the re 4 
Bob halted. 

"Gee! but this is heavy. I'm going to look inside. I bet — ." 

"Wo you're not, old shirk. There's nothing the matter. You pi 
up the shafts and go on !" 

So on they went with a conversation broken now and then by stel 
hills or rough places. 

"Gee, but won't Reddy be mad!" 

"Serves him right, the old pill!" 

"If he ever gets wind of who did this oh ! heavens, won't we cal 

it?" 

"Get wind of it ? You bet your life he'll spot us the first thim' 

At the end of the second mile Bob rebelled. 

"Say, fellows, ain't this enough ? It's heavy as lead and two railed 
a plenty. The old fox will never find it anyway." 






I thought that next hill would scare you," said Jim, "but I guess 
lis will do. Say, won't Redely be some hot when he prepares to roll 
own the avenue and finds his equipage gone." 

"Here pull it over here in the bushes. There that's it. Now all- 
board back for breakfast, come on!" 

But all six stood suddenly petrified at the sight of Reddy's head in 
le carriage window. 
1 "Thank you, boys," he said in the pleasantest of voices. "I've had 

very nice ride. Now will you please take me back to school % It'll 
>on be time for breakfast." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 93 



A Trip Down a Mexican Canal 

(A Travel Sketch.) 



Josephine Wilson. 
I We had been looking forward for sometime to a trip on this old canal 
ad now that the day had actually arrived it was with the greatest 
leasure that we took our seats in one of the many pretty barges bobbing 
oout on the water. 

\ The barge was beautifully decorated on the outside with flowers; 
imdreds and hundreds of flowers were strung from one end to the other. 
<ed flowers, blue flowers, yellow flowers and in fact every color of 
ower was used and yet so artistically were they strung and with such 
iste that the effect was wonderful. Our boatman was a tall, dark In- 
dian who in his high-peaked hat and bright colored blanket fitted in 
3autifully our quaint and picturesque surroundings. 
The banks of the canal which we passed, were for the most part 
rown up in a luxuriant mass of tropical fruit; oranges, bananas and 
tangoes were the commonest of these, and so heavy-laden was the 
8 with their fragrance that at times it was almost sickening. Here and 
lere the monotony was broken by a group of Mexican huts, one of these 
hich appeared larger than the rest excited our curiosity to such an 
ttent that we asked the boatman to let us land and pay a visit to 
le place. 



94 The St. Mary's Muse. 



; 



The camp, or whatever it might be called, consisted of about eight I 
ten miserable little huts, before which a crowd of dirty little urchij 
were making a lot of fuss. Here and there an occasional woman w| 
building an out-of-door fire or in the act of preparing a meal. 

We had not so much as set foot on the cleared spot where the hvi 
were, when one of the dogs, followed by several others, set up suchi 
yelling that judging from the racket they made there might have be I 
fifty of the ugly skinny beasts. Our guide finally explained to o.l 
of the women that we were tourists out to see the country and the doi 
were called off and we were invited to come and look at some of tl 
wares they had to sell. Such a quantity of pretty hand-woven baskel 
brightly colored blankets and bags, along with other Mexican curii 
were produced that it was with great difficulty that we at length pull I 
ourselves away, carrying with us several souvenirs to remind us of oft 
first trip to a real Indian village. 



A Usual Occurrence at Lunch Period 

(Every-day Sketch.) 



Mary Brown Butler. 

Oh, dear ! How much more time have we before the bell % I'll c 
clare we certainly ought to have more than fifteen minutes at this lun 
period. I never know whether I'm coming or going, for I'm always 
such a hurry and rush. How some people find time to stroll arom 
the grove now is beyond me! But I know they must be the unfortj 
nate ones who never get any mail! Isn't it just too provoking? Tj 
mail never gets here in the morning before chapel time any more, ail 
there is always such a mob over at the office at lunch that I never c;|| 
get mine. And then, too, I never have time to read all my mime 
ous ( ?) letters in just fifteen minutes ! The bell always rings for clas 
when I'm in the most thrilling part. 

And I always have something "most important" to tell some one 
this time, and I never can find them, of course. By the time I cha 
a girl all over this place, and go from Miss Shattuck's dormitory 



The St. Mary's Muse. 95 



snior Hall searching for her, why I have entirely forgotten what I had 
tell her. Oh yes ! I forgot that permission ! I knew I had some- 
ing on my mind. I forgot to file my permission to go out this after- 
on, and now I'm afraid it's too late. However, I'll be brave and try. 
here is a pencil ? Dear me ! I never can find a thing when I get in 
hurry. For mercy's sake, somebody lend me a pencil ! 
And I did want to find time to glance over my lesson before class. 
H course I'll get a question in the part I haven't looked at ! Guess 
1 better study a little. Goodness gracious ! ! You can't mean that's 
3 bell already ! Here I have been sitting down talking away so fast 
at I haven't done a single one of the many things that I was just 
liged to do. And I don't even know where my book is ! I simply 
lit find it, as I went to class yesterday without it and got reported. 
see now where I get late today. "To get late" or "to go to class with- 
[ t a book," that is the question ! ! 



SCHOOL NEWS 



ELLEN ARMISTEAD JOHNSON and ELIZABETH ANDERSON TARRY, Editoks 



January 27 

An excellent cure for the "blues" are Mrs. Cruikshank's teas. On 
3nday, the 27th of January, at four o'clock, several girls from West 
!>ck, Clair Blount, Annie Cameron, Louise Eliot, Marie Hopkins and 
>lly Wood ; from East Rock, Lynn Grayson and Laura Clark ; and 

free from Main Building, Franeisca King, Elizabeth and Cornelia 
aring, met in Mrs. Cruikshank's cozy apartment for tea and general 
irrymaking With the famous tea they had peanut-butter, sandwiches, 
d then a jolly tie cracking nuts and story-telling. Each had some ex- 

''rience or opinion to express and from the happy group a steady buzz 
is heard. 

The little electric bell starts and ends a great many things at St. 
ary's, so their delightful party broke up with many sincere thanks 
their charming hostess and they went to their respective abodes 
len it sent forth its shrill summons. E. S. W. 



96 The St. Mary's Muse. 



January 29 

What a pleasant surprise was given the Sophomores, on Wednesc 
January 29th, when on going for our mail, after lunch, we were gi\ 
invitations bidding us to come to Mrs. Lay's at five o'clock. 

Remembering the hospitality tendered by Mrs. Lay on all oocasio 
we were assembled in her cozy parlor at a. few minutes after five, wh 
for nearly an hour we engaged in pleasant conversation, while M 
Lay served hot chocolate, cake and candy, assisted by two of her dau 
ters. Loath to leave, we remained until the big bell sounded forth 
summons to dinner, then bidding Mrs. Lay "good-bye" departed, dec] 
ing the party to be a pleasant one indeed. M. E. R 









February I 

A Dramatic Recital was given in the auditorium on Saturday ev 
ing, February 1st, by Miss Florence Davis. 

The first number presented was an adaptation of John Luther Lor 
delightful story, Madame Butterfly. Miss Davis brought to her in 
prestation the real Japanese atmosphere, and vividly potrayed the trai 
tions of emotion in the experiences of the unfortunate Japanese maid 

In the group of lyrics, the reader was thoroughly enjoyable while 
the final number in the impersonation of the various characters 
"Merely Mary Ann," showed her efficiency as a reader, and each cl 
acter stood out before the audience with clearness and realism. 

Miss Davis has a charming platform manner and brings to all of 
readings a clearness of enunciation and a literary appreciation that 
delightful. Miss MeOobb's songs were greatly enjoyed and prove 
pleasant interlude in an altogether satisfactory program. 



February 3 

On Monday night, February 3d, the University Dramatic Club g 
a delightful entertainment in the school auditorium, a comedy in th| 
acts, entitled "What Happened to Jones." The parts were well c; 
and the characters being sustained throughout. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 97 



Those deserving special mention were C. F. Coggins in the part of 
!nes ; W. P. M. Weeks as Ebenezer Goodly, and his wife H. V. John- 
a ; W. B. Pitts in the part of the "old maid sister," too, was unusually 
od, and Mr. Conrad made a graceful and most fascinating Cissy. 
The play itself is full of comedy, which received frequent applause 
>m a most appreciative audience. We hope that the University Dra- 
itic Club, will in the next tour visit us again in our auditorium. 



February 4— Freshmen-Junior Reception 

/Tuesday evening, February 4th, at eight o'clock, the doors of the re- 
gion room were thrown open by the Freshmen to the Junior Class, 
owing the parlor beautifully festooned in the two class colors, green 
d white, and orange and black. Cushions were attractively arranged 
the window seats and chairs ; palms and ferns were most artistically 
3d, adding much to the beauty of the room. As the Juniors entered 
3 room they were handed heart-shaped cards on which were questions 
be answered by one letter or group of letters of the alphabet. These 
pt them busy most of the evening. Ice cram, cake and salted pea- 
ts were served from the grill room. After the refreshments the rugs 
«re turned back and all enjoyed dancing till the ringing of the big 
11. E. P. Smith. 



SCHOOL GOSSIP 



SUSIE McIVER and LAURA MARGARET HOPPE, Editors 



Mrs. Brigham came up from Savannah to spend several days with 
r daughter, Gertrude. 

Ellen Duvall ('08) and Jessie Harris ('05-'08), spent a few days at 
3 school. 

iKate Smith (1910-'12) on her way home from ISFew York, where she 
s been studying voice, spent a week with her friends. 
Shirley Dashiell went home on account of ill health, but her many 
ends hope that she will be able to return before long. 



98 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Helen Harris has had a short visit from her mother. 

Mary Michaux and Edith Clarke enjoyed visits from their fathe:] 
during the month. 

Maie London has been over to Pittsboro to visit her grandparents. 

Mr. H. A. London, Mr. Mann and Mr. Grant have paid short visi 
to their daughters. 

We were all sorry to hear that Dr. Moore was obliged to come i 
from Wilson to take Mabel home on account of an attack of appenc 
citis. 

Frances Pender and Mary Dortch have had visits from their brothei 

Jane Kerr and Lizzie Winston spent the week end at their homes. 

Clara Cleaton had as her guest for a few days in February, Adelai 
Bennett, of Portsmouth. 

We are glad to welcome "a. new girl," Arlene Joyner, of Greenvil 
E". C. 

Helen Hartridge had a short visit from her brother who stopp 
by on his way from New York. 

Mrs. Taylor paid Mary a short visit on the 18th. 

Julia Bond's father and brother spent a few days with her. 

Mary Bryan Griswold went to her home in Durham to spend a f 
days. 

Virginia Davis has been in Wilson a few days on account of the i 
ness of her father. 

Miss Kate Hardy, of Greensboro, a Saint Mary's girl of several ye; 
ago, spent a day and night at St. Mary's in January. 

Tissie Harrison's short visit to St. Mary's in February was ve 
much enjoyed by her many friends here. 

Mary Shuford ('10) and Annie C. Wood passed through Ealeigh 
their way from the White-Ward wedding where they were bridesman 
and their many St. Mary's friends enjoyed very much the short vi 
they made at the school. 

Caroline Jones spent several days in Charlotte the latter part of J; 
uary where she was a bridesmaid at the marriage of her cousin, M 
Marguerite Springs to Mr. Meyers. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 99 



IN LIGHTER VEIN— CLIPPINGS 



A Lady of Mark. 

Belinda is a village belle, 
Her beauty has no= 

Her charming manner is perfection, 
There is no one like her in this § 

I wonder would she think me rash 
If after her I made a — 

And with a manner suave and bland 
I frankly asked her for her sst 

When I murmured, "Tell me, dearie," 
"Would she say "Yes" unto my ? 

And yet — Belinda's tongue's so brisk 

I fear I'd be an * — Harper's Weekly. 



A Carpenter's Serenade 

A lath! I quite a door you, dear, 

I've hallways loved your laughter; 
Oh, window you intend to grant 

The wish my hopes are rafter? 

When first I sawyer smile, 'twas plane 

I wood rejoice to marry; 
Oh, let us to the joiner's hie, 

Nor longer shingle tarry! 

And now that I have axed you, dear, 

Plumb, square and on the level, 
(I've always wanted 2 by 4), 

Don't spile hope's happy revel. 

The cornice waving, Peggy, dear, 

The gables all are ringing; 
Why let me pine? for oh, you know, 

I'm sawdust when I'm singing. — Ex. 



TKe St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year = = = = One Doll; 

Single Copies = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C. 
the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 1912-1913. 

Caboline Clarke Jones, Editor-in-Chief. 

Julia Washington Allen, Mart Brown Butler, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Ellen Armistead Johnson, Susie McIver, Elise Gordon Stiles, 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry, Amy Conyers Winston. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, Business Manager. 

Myrtle Warren, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



Lent 

We all keep Lent at St. Mary's and we all look forward to Lent. Tl 
year the services in the chapel have been better attended than usual ai 
we hope that they will continue to be so well attended. During Le 
we all sew a great deal and while we are sewing don't you think that i 
ought to think of the poor little children who need so many things ai 
make something for some of them ? Then our Easter offering will me; 
so much more to us. 






The Junior Auxiliaries at St. Mary's 

The school is divided into seven chapters according to the halls ai 
buildings. Miss Katie is, of course, at the head and is the general s 
pervisor. During the year we have meetings every other Sunday nig 
and read articles and stories about missionaries and the work that t 
church has done and what is to be done. During Lent most of o 
chapters either sew for some poor people or raise money to send ai 
help some good cause — like the Thompson Orphanage. The Juni 
Auxiliary is very beneficial to all of us and we should profit by t. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 101 

:etings. The teachers also have a chapter of the Woman's Auxiliary 
i they also work as we do. Every girl in school belongs to some 
jipter and the evenings that are spent in listening to stories of mis- 
naries and of the good they, the Christians, are doing, are always 
>st enjoyable. 



ThanK You 

The editors of the Annual Muse wish to thank all of you girls for 
| wonderful way you have helped us, not only by paying your assess- 
unts but for taking such an interest in the picture. And we hope that 
) Annual will please you. 



Miss punter's Visit 

Miss Claudia Hunter, of Henderson, spent a few days at St. Mary's 
ring January and spoke to the girls on Foreign Missions. She is 
'ich interested in what is going on now in Japan, and spoke chiefly of 
8 mission work there. By her suggestion, the chapters have gotten 
pies of two books on Japan, issued by the Foreign and Domestic Mis- 
nary Society of New York, and these works are being read and stud- 
f ;l in the chapters in their Sunday night meetings. There is also a 
ipply of Japanese postcards which have been shown through a reflect- 
ive to some of the chapters, and were found very interesting. Miss 
pater should feel repaid that her suggestions were so promptly fol- 
ved. 



102 The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN MEMORIAM 

Mrs. Sophronia Horner Winston, of Raleigh, Alumna of St. Mar, 
and president of the St. Mary's Alumnse Association, died in Philad 
phia, February 18th. The Muse wishes to express the deep syinpat 
of the student body of St. Mary's for the members of her bereaved fa 
ily and particularly for her daughter, Amy Winston, their friend a 
schoolmate. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

("Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(.Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President .... Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

Vice-President - 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

n™. - ci„ „ .„„ (Miss Anna N. Butxon, Winston-Salem. 

Field Secretaries - - { Miss Annie Root, Raleigh. 



DEATH OF MRS. WINSTON 



It is with deep regret and sorrow that the Alumnse body learned of 
the death of their President and loyal co-worker, Mrs. Sophronia 

, Homer Winston, which occurred in Philadelphia, February 18th. 

Mrs. Winston was a graduate of St. Mary's, and has always shown 
in word and deed her faith and loyalty to the school. She was elected 

jj President of the Alumnse Association in May, 1912. Her health failed 
rapidly after that, but she did not give up her efforts and interest on 
behalf of the Association. When urged by her physicians to give up 

: all of her social activities and church work she held on to her plans for 
the Alumna?. As late as November, she had a called meeting of the 
Alumnse Council at her house, when she was too ill to attend, but gave 

i out by proxy her ideas and plans for completing the Alumnse Schol- 
arships. 

As to Mrs. Winston's social and family life, we feel that the fol- 

I lowing sympathetic and accurate account from the News and Observer 
expresses best what we would say : 

Mrs. Winston suffered last year a nervous breakdown that sent her to a New 
York resting place, and she spent all the summer there. She came back but 
little improved. Spending some weeks at home, she was rarely able to enter- 
tain her friends on account of protracted illness. In early January she left for 
Jefferson Hospital, and has been under the constant care of that great institu- 
tion since. 

In the social and club life of North Carolina, particularly in Oxford, Durham, 
and Raleigh, she has been all her married life one of the most prominent of 
North Carolina women. In the Episcopal church she has been quite as well 



104 The St. Mary's Muse. 



kjnown, and in both she did far beyond her strength, and her energies for a 
city plan for a more beautiful Raleigh will be remembered in all future con- 
struction. 

Mrs. Winston was Miss Sophronia Horner and was born in Oxford September 
24, 1861. She lived in Oxford until 1894, when she moved to Durham with her 
husband and family. There they remained until the spring of 1909, when Judge 
Winston moved to Raleigh, formed a partnership with Governor Charles B. 
Aycock, and they have since lived here. 

She was born of a family of educators and church people as widely known 
as any that North Carolina has had, and married into a family of such notables 
as Judge R. W. Winston, her husband; George T. Winston, retired president of 
A. and M., and the universities of North Carolina and Texas; and Francis D. 
Winston, lawyer and politician of Bertie. She was the daughter of James H. 
Horner, the founder of Horner's School; the sister of Jerome Horner, present 
head, and the sister of Bishop Junius Horner, of the Western North Carolina 
Diocese. 

MOST INTELLECTUAL, WOMAN. 

Mrs. Winston inherited the intellectual gifts and strength of character from 
her father, the greatest teacher of his generation, and her mother, who was 
honored and looked up to by hundreds of Horner boys who were fortunate 
enough to be trained at the famous school. In such associations Mrs. Winston 
was educated in the books of her brothers and mastered all the studies that 
they mastered. In North Carolina there was no woman with more gifts of 
mind. She wrote with ease and her style showed wide reading and reflection. 
She was deeply interested in affairs of St. Mary's School, where she graduated, 
and was esteemed as one of the most accomplished graduates of an institution 
famed for its gifted daughters. A few years ago, at a banquet given at St. 
Mary's, Mrs. Winston responded to a toast, and it was so graceful and brilliant 
as to delight the distinguished audience gathered. Ten years ago the News and 
Observer printed a Woman's Edition. It was a really excellent number, edited 
by Mrs. Winston, assisted by a number of Durham ladies. No paper of more 
literary excellence and interesting features has been printed in the State. 

Mrs. Winston had much public spirit. She received a cordial welcome upon 
coming to Raleigh to live and became at once a favorite in social circles and a 
leader in her church. She had a large conception of the future of the Capital 
City and was deeply interested in a large plan to make the city beautiful, 
giving her thought and her time toward a comprehensive plan that looked to 
an artistic and symmetrical development of the parks and squares and all that 
would make Raleigh a beautiful city in art and in architecture, in landscape and 
gardens, parks and walks, in statuary and paintings. But gifted as she was as 
a writer and deeply interested in all that went to make the right sort of city 
development, Mrs. Winston was most accomplished as a homekeeper. Her hos- 
pitality was gracious and charming, and her home the attractive center of large 
gatherings of friends. 

The home life of the Winston and Horner families is, after all, the chapter 
which means most to them. No family in North Carolina is more noted for 
its loyalty to an honored name than this one. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 105 



i The four children were the joy of her life and her happiness in the home 
was joy raised to the highest power. Each member of it has proven worthy of 

ithe two distinguished sides of the house. The oldest, James Horner Winston, 
is a growing lawyer of Chicago, and Robert Winston, Jr., is gaining glory as a 
teacher in Bingham School, Asheville. More gracious young women than Mrs. 
F. B. Webb, of Durham, who was Miss Gertrude Winston, and Miss Amabel C. 
Winston, student at St. Mary's School, have not lived in Raleigh. 

Mrs. Winston leaves also five sisters; Mrs. R. C. Strong, of Raleigh; Mrs. A. 
W. Graham and Mrs. H. G. Cooper, of Oxford; Mrs. W. S. Manning, of Spartan- 
burg, S. C; Miss Mary E. Horner, of Valle Crucis, and her two brothers, Bishop 

iHorner and Prof. Jerome Horner, of Oxford. There are many distinguished 
kinspeople throughout the State. 

In spite of her protracted ill health she never ceased her life of religious and 
social leadership. The Episcopal church loses one of its powerful members. 

On February 19th the Alumnae Council met at St. Mary's, called 
'together on account of the death of Mrs. Winston, the President of the 
Alumnae Association. The Council, acting for the Association, sent 
flowers to the Winston home, and drew up the following resolutions : 

RESOLUTIONS 

Whereas, Our beloved President, Mrs. Robert W. Winston, entered 
into rest on Tuesday, February 18, 1913, be it 

Resolved, That we express to her family our deep sorrow in their 
i affliction, praying to the God whom she loved and served so faithfully 
to bless and comfort them. That we extend our special tenderness to 
her youngest daughter, who is now a member of the Senior Class at 
l St, Mary's, in the loss of a mother whose passionate sympathy with 
girlhood was so unfailing, and whose ideals for girlhood were so deli- 
cate, so high and so sensitive that they must remain as an inspiration. 
Resolved, That the Alumnae Association, standing in need today of 
her wise judgment, her unselfish service, her untiring enthusiasm, and 
her great heart, expresses its sense of irreparable loss. 

Resolved further, That a copy of these resolution be transmitted to 
the family of our beloved President, and put upon the records of this 
Association as a token of our affection and admiration. 

Kate MoKimmon", 
Margaret Busbee Shipp, 
Margaret CRUiKSHAisrE:, 
Annie Gales Root, 
Committee St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



106 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Williamson— Bridgers 

Mr. and Mrs. John Luther Bridgers 

announce the marriage of their daughter 

Mary Irwin 

to 

Mr. Frank Potts Williamson 

on Wednesday the first day of January 

nineteen hundred and thirteen 

at the church of Saint Mary the Virgin 

Sagada, Philippine Islands 



At Home 

after January the twenty-fifth 

Zamboanga 

Philippine Islands 



Storey— Gales 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cameron Gales 

request the honour of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Mary Seaton 

to 

Mr. Charles Edgar Storey, Jr. 

on Tuesday evening, February the fourth 

at eight o'clock 

137 Glen Avenue 

Mt. Vernon, New York 



READ !— MARK !— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
eaders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
winciple to patronize those that.help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
o advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
heir loss, not ours. 



laleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Ready'tO'Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls. 

Efjt Jf aStfjKin Fayetteville 

' ~^ Street 



^zxtxaxe-^ 




Exclusive 



| Millinery 



Bu$ine$$ Manager's $ong 
How dear to my heart 
!$ the ca$h for $ub$cription, 
When the generou$ $ub$criber 

Pre$ent$ it to view; 
But the one who won't pay — 
I refrain from description, 
For perhapl, gentle reader, 

That one may be you. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 



MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



1 It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

Established 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 

COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

WE SELL, GOSSARD'S LACE 

FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



DI 



'o;;i 



I!- 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOTS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



A Narrow Escape 
Although the boy ne'er learned to spell, 

His future wasn't wrecked — 
He simply used quotation marks, 

And wrote in dialect. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

The 
MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO' 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 



Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

:he OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

Both Phones: < 2 ofi 



JOLLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Special 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 



oat Suits, School Dresses, Evening- Costumes, Waists, Coats, and Accessory Lines 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trinimingrs, Gloves, Hosiery, Laces, Notions, Etc. 



tfcKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. 



Fayetteville St. 



C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds ol Keys Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 



I thought I knew I knew it all, 
But now I must confess, 

The more I know I know I know, 
I know I know the less. — Ex. 



KING'S GROCERY 
"The Little Store" 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

^, GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 

- CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 



YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 



JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 

Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescript! onist 



Good Things Always at 



BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets, 



124 Fayetteville Street 



Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
118 E. Davie Street Raleigh N. C 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 



G. H. DORTCH, 

Secretary. 



R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 



210 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. G. 



There are meters of accent, 
And meters of tone, 

But the best of all meters, 
Is to meter alone. — Ex. 



M. ROSENTHAL -a-SvEa™™ 



HO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON <fe HARGETT STS. 



and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 

EDWARDS 5 

Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
he Wake Drug- Store. Phones 228 



ICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE 
Prompt Delivery 



Phones 107 



oily 



&- Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 



SIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayette ville Street 

i DARNELL & THOMAS 

MUSIC HOUSE 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
5 S. Harrington Street Phone 941 M 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything In Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

J. R. FEEEALL & CO.— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 
222 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 

WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 COR. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS 



My bonnet spreads over the ocean, 
My bonnet spreads over the sea; 

To merely spread over the sidewalk 
Is not enough for me. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

[New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

llAll|1All . RALEIGH 

NORFOLK NEW bern 

iivui Wkn GOLDSBORO 

Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



'. w. CROXTON, 
Traffic Manager, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. UPCHURCH, 

General Agent, RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located aj 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th an( 
10th Ste., Washington, D. C, is now showing th 
newest creations in fine 14 K. Jewelry, silverware 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and importe 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable ns 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and reparin 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DES10. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 
Picture Frames and Window Shades 

PERRY'S ART STORE 
S. Wilmington Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicit* 

THE MECHANICS SAVING BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Calendar for January-February 



January 27. Mrs. Cruikshank entertains. 

January 29. Mrs. Lay entertains Sophomore Class. 

February 1. Miss Davis' recital in Auditorium. 

February 3. Carolina Dramatic Club present "What Happened to Jones" i 

Auditorium. 

February 4. Freshman party to Junior Class. 

February 5. Ash Wednesday. 

February 8. Mr. Lay's talk, on Japan, in the parlor. 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

All Our Work Done by The Goodyear Welt System 

104 E. Hargett Street 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishme 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 

204 S. Salisbury Street 



THE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A. & M. 
Athletic Association. $1.60 per year. Walter 
C. Taylor, Bus. Mgr., West Raleigh, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD 

13 W. HargettSt. Stylish Millinery 



TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishing 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 

Personal attention to mail orders. Bell Phone 4 



BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST DRY GOOD STORE 

Come and See Us in Our New Home 

Everything: for Woman's Wear. Ready-to- Wear Garments of all Kinds 



Advertisements 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

Premier Carrier of the South 

t 

i. .^ 

| Most Direct Line to All Points 

NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST 

Through sleeping cars to all principal cities; through Tourist 
Cars to San Francisco and other California points. All- 
year Tourist tickets on sale to principal Western points. 
Convenient local, as well as through trains. Electrically 
lighted coaches. Complete Dining Car Service on all 
through trains. Ask representatives of Southern Railway 
about special rates account Christmas holidays; also various 
other special occasions. If you are contemplating a trip to 
any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. 
They will gladly and courteously furnish you with all infor- 
mation as to the cheapest and most comfortable way in 
which to make the trip. Will also be glad to secure Pull- 
man Sleeping Car reservations for you. 

i . F. CARY, General Passenger Agent, J. O. JONES, Traveling Passenger Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



iEaattr Number 




The St. Mary's Muse. 

EASTER NUMBER 



|)L. XVLX March, 1913. No. 6. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



MARY BROWN BUTLER and JULIA WASHINGTON ALLEN, Editors 



"Spring 



FLORA LEWIS. 



Spring! with her meadows blossoming into flower, 
With her green foliage glittering in the sun, 
And fish that dance and play upon the waves, 
All these enchanting pictures wrapped in one! 
And from the greenness of yon blossoming bough 
We hear the robin calling to us — "Spring!" . 

It seems God took the glory of the fall, 
With all its leaves of red and brilliant gold, 
And mixed with winter's dazzling snow, 
And pictures that the hoary frost has told; 
And shaping them into wealth unrivaled, 
He gives us — "Spring!" 



An Adventure 



ELLEN ARMISTEAD JOHNSON. 



Aunt Mary had promised to tell the children a story about their 
acle William, and this is what she told when they were all gathered 
front of the big open fire one winter afternoon: 
"As William and his body servant neared the big spring they heard 
e approach of the soldiers who came every day at this time to water 
eir horses. Determining that no matter what happened, the troopers 
ould not have the few rabbits which they had tramped so many 



108 The St. Mart's Muse. 

miles to secure, the two boys hastily scrambled into the upper branch* 
of a big oak tree which stood above the spring. As they settled then 
selves close to the huge trunk they hoped that, as it was dusky, the 
would not be seen, for who could doubt that these troopers would ha 1 ; 
any scruples about taking their game when only the week before the 
had overtaken the youngsters as they brought the last of the family 
live stock, two superb horses, from the upper pasture and not hesitatin 
to cover them with their guns had led away their charges. 

"Scarcely had they crouched against the trunk when about a scoi 
of ragged men, whose tatters showed that at one time they had bee 
clothed in regulation army uniforms, rode noisily down to the bubblin 
spring. As the dusty horses smelt the fresh water they trotted hui 
riedly down the incline, paying absolutely no attention to their rider 
pull as they would. Several of the men held desperately to thei 
saddles, but despite their evident efforts to keep firm seats they wei 
thumped awkwardly up and down, and one awkward fellow actuall 
pitched off into the spring branch, when his huge black horse suddenl 
stopped and began to drink. 

"This caused much amusement and coarse joking among his fellow 
and they left the spring laughing about their enemies who couldn' 
even make them leave their fort after two weeks of steady bombarc 
inent and who were never able to get through the lines. As the 
reached the top of the incline one of the men, glancing up, noticed th 
two figures in the big oak and called out to his comrades to 'Loo 
there,' started to point out the trembling boys; just as he did so hi 
horse stumbled and in trying to hold on he dropped his rifle. I 
exploded as it struck a flat slab of lime stone, and the men fled helte 
skelter, thinking that their foes had finally evaded the pickets an( 
were attacking from the rear. A few of the braver ones fired righ 
and left, but this only further frightened those in front, and sooi 
William and black Joe saw the whole throng vanish down the fores 
road, headed toward the main camp. 

"The boys climbed down and picking up the forgotten rifle rai 
quickly home to tell William's mother of their adventure. The; 
derived much enjoyment from it and no doubt would have thought i 



The St. Mary's Muse. 109 



m funnier if they could have seen the confusion that the camp was 
'■own into upon the arrival of the terrified men and what happened 
rt'he man who had dropped his gun when the truth was found out." 



A Trip Through Scotland 

(A Travel Sketch.) 



BELLE CAMERON. 



The London express for Edinburg drew into the station of Melrose 
[I we soon found ourselves driving up the street and around a lovely 
illed garden, to stop at last at a very quaint little inn. That night 

were to see the old Abbey by moonlight, when we hoped to see the 
Id Cross on the Wizard's tomb as Scott saw it. We were disap- 
inted, however, because it rained, but the old guide quoted the "Lay 
the Last Minstrel" with his Gaelic accent and this added greatly to 
1 charm of it. 

The next morning we all started off for a long coaching trip to 
)botsford and Dryburg. At the former we drove through the beau- 
ul park, many trees of which Sir Walter Scott planted himself. As 
i wound in and out along the banks of the Tweed we caught a glimpse 

the beautiful old stone house where one can imagine the different 
aracters of the Waverly novels, roaming about its capacious rooms, 
hen the old crone that acts as a guide leads you up to the Aden you 
jQ. almost feel the very presence of the "Wizard of the North," with 
erything exactly as he left it. There on his desk are the very pens 
ith which he wrote so many world-famous books. All around the 
fee walls are bookcases filled with the books that he loved and 
mired most. As you step into the living room you see that this 
me was not a mere name for the room, but the first minute you see 
3 attractiveness and the comfort you know that he must have used 
as a living room part of the time at least. 

Leaving Abbotsford we drove back through the little town of Melrose 
st the Eildon Hills to Dryburg. Stepping out of the coach again, we 
liked across a small suspension bridge and down a long, lovely lane. 
>on we saw through the trees the majestic ruins of what was once the 



110 The St. Maky's Muse. 

beautiful old abbey of Dryburg. Here it was with sorrowful ham 
that the people laid the body of their fellow countryman, Sir Walti 
Scott, where his, with many other tombs, are guarded by the ruine 
walls as sentinels. 

It was with much regret that we left this interesting communit 
and soon our train brought us every minute nearer to Edinburg, tl 
beautiful city of the north. 

Here, there are so many interesting and historic things that I cou 
not begin to describe them all so I will only mention some few \ 
those we saw. 

First we visited the castle, with its royal lodging, where the monarc' 
of Scotland lived before Holyrood was built, the crown room with tl 
crown jewels of Scotland, Mary Queen of Scots' room, where h< 
little son, James VI of Scotland and James I of England, was bor: 
the banqueting hall where the Douglas black dinner was eaten, ac 
the old court-yard where the young Earl of Douglas and his litt; 
brother, Lord David, were beheaded. There are two things which a: 
here at this same old castle, which to me are still more interestir 
than any that I have told of yet, and one of them is Queen Margaret 
chapel, the oldest building in Edinburg. The other is the old stall 
prison, where the Earl of Argyle slept so calmly, although he kne 
that in a few hours he would be headless. 

Although we hated so to leave here we must, or we should not ha 1 * 
had any time left for other places. 

We got our breakfast very early the next morning and went to tl: 
military service at St. Giles. This early service with no other musi 
but that of the band of the regiment and hundreds of Highlanders a 
in different colored tartan uniforms was very impressive. Leaviu 
here we passed along from High street, as it is called, up on t\\ 
hill at the castle, into Canongate. Canongate and Cowgate are th 
queerest, most picturesque looking streets you ever saw. They hav 
so many "wynds and closes" as they are called, that if you went bac 
into one you would go into a dirty court with dark, dismal lookin 
rooms on all sides. There are so many little alleys that lead into on 
another that it is just like a maze. But no matter how many there ar( 



The St. Mary's Muse. Ill 



3iy foot of it could tell some tale, for of everything that ever happened 
'■ Scottish history, part of it took place here. 

As you drive along here you pass John Knox's house and — on, I 
l not begin to tell you a third of the interesting places that are on 
')se streets. 

At the end of Canongate is Holyrood, the palace of the Stuarts. 
On entering Holyrood your first thought is of Mary Queen of 
! ots. When you go into her room you imagine her standing before 
a, beautiful, graceful, and stately, and when you are pointed out 
I blood stain on the floor where Rizzio was murdered by Darnley, 
-all seems so real that cold shivers run down your back. In this day 
J 3 room of greatest importance of the palace is the banqueting hall 
tere the peers of Scotland are selected. The abbey of Holyrood is 
'much in ruins that you can not get much of an idea of what it really 
[ ,s. The combination of romance and history gives this dark, gloomy 
f I place its charm. 

''Among the many attractions of this interesting city is Princes street, 
[ th its many beautiful gardens which divides the "Old City" from 
H new. In this noted street is a magnificent monument to Sir Walter 
'ott, impressive recollections of which are carried away by many 
busands of visitors who loved and admired this great man. As we 
3d on towards Aberdeen we crossed the famous bridge over the 
'rth of Forth, which as you know, is one of the most famous bridges 
the world. 
'Looking out of the car window we saw the British northern fleet, 
; aded by the terrible Dreadnought, which happened to be stationed 
%re for a time. 

•Trying through the country as we were, we caught a glimpse of the 

'imeron Highlanders in their summer camp, near Dundee. 

*Our next point was Inverness, a most attractive city in the High- 

|T ids. Soon after arriving here we went in a coach, to the field of Col- 

[ } len, where Prince Charlie and his brave followers made their last 

md for the Stuart cause. Here at Inverness is situated the beautiful 

1 castle of Inverness, in front of which stands the elegant statue of 

ora McDonald, overlooking the river Ness. We had an invitation 



112 The St. Mary's Muse. 

to Skibo castle, the home of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, but his privai 
yacht had just left Inverness a very few minutes before we got ther 
so we decided not to go, and instead we took the train for Fort Wi 
Ham. In the course of this journey we caught our first glimpse of tl 
snow-topped Ben JSTevis, the highest peak in Great Britain. We all 
passed the ancient castle of Inverlochy. 

Our sail from Fort William to Oban was one that nothing coul 
possibly erase from my mind, it was so vivid. The lake was like 
sheet of glass, reflecting the wonderful colors and hues of the gorgeoi 
Highland sunset. I never imagined that nature was so wonderful i 
variation of color. The contrast between the dark and lowering in 01 
place and like a fiery furnace in another is so alluring that it in 
presses itself so vividly on the mind that you can never forget it. 

This wonderful northern twilight lasted so long that it was ju 
getting dark when we reached Oban at ten o'clock that night. As v 
came into the harbor we passed the ruins of the old castle Dumstafnag 
the home of the kings of Scotland. 

After leaving Oban the next morning our steamer skirted the islau 
of Mull and took us to the island of Iona, where St, Columba ke] 
the fire of Christianity burning so long a time and thus preserved 
till it spread all over the land of Scotland and England. 

Here, on this little island, are the graves of the very first Scottis 
kings, some of which- are so old that the names of them are not knowi 
The next place we touched was Staffa. This is a very small island c 
the same formation of rock as the Giant's Causeway of Ireland. Lea' 
ing Oban that afternoon we reached Glasgow at nearly midnigh 
Glasgow is the second city of Great Britain and has the greatest shi] 
yards of the world. Starting out in the early morning we went b 
rail to Balloch, where we took the little boat that takes you down Loc 
Lomond to Inversnaid. Here, on a coach we began our charmin 
drives through a part of the Rob Roy country to Stronach Clacher 
the end of Loch Katrine. Our charming little sail down the Loch i 
the little boat, "Sir Walter Scott," past Ellen's Isle and the Silve 
Strand, all of which are among the well known scecnes of "The Lad 
of the Lake." We disembarked and were soon at the Trossachs Hote 



The St. Mary's Muse. 113 



lere we had lunch. Soon after we again took our seats on the coach 
• Callander, where we ended our trip through the Trossachs, which 
s to us as delightful as most tourists find it. 

After a very short ride on the train we reached the town of Stirling, 
ith its old castle so full of historical associations and surrounded as 
is with noted battlefields. The view from the walls of this castle is 
e of the most extensive in Scotland. It leaves in our minds a* 
lightful impression as we recall this romantic land of the thistle 
d the heather. 



"A Judgment by Appearances " 



MARION STANFORD. 



'"I don't want to go with her, indeed I don't," and Lucia Knowles 
iims down the book she has been reading. The cause of her wrathful 
eech seems to be a notice from the Cotillion Club that she is to take 
[Certain Harriet Lowe to the Senior reception, which is to take place 
I the following night. The Senior reception is the swellest affair 

Grlenwood, the fashionable school for girls, near Baltimore, and at 
bich every girl wishes to appear her very, very best. Therefore it 
as with somewhat a mixture of contempt and sympathy that Betty 
arlton says to her roommate : "But Lucia, dear, you must go with 
?r. You can never hurt her feelings like that, and that is just exactly 
hat would happen if you refused to take her. It isn't like she 
Wouldn't find it out, but she is bound to do that because Eleanor Watt, 
ho is on the committee, will be sure to tell her about it. 

"Yes, I know that," answered Lucia, "but she hasn't any right to 
>oil my evening and she will if I have to take her. Oh, Betty, if 
ra only knew how I have counted on appearing at my best tomorrow 
ight, and how can I do that when Harriet Lowe will probably go, 
;tired in a white shirtwaist and skirt ? I am going straight down to 
le sitting room and write her a note telling her I am not going." 

Betty, who, standing before the dresser had been trying to arrange 
|er hair, let it drop in splendid disarray around her shoulders. 



114 The St. Maky's Muse. 

"Why, Lucia Knowles, I had a better opinion of you than that. 
You know you can't do such a thing. Think how she would feel." 

But Lucia, heedless to all of her roommate's exclamations, run 
down to the sitting room to write the intended note of refusal, anc 
Betty sits down in despair. 

"Oh, if she only wouldn't do it," she thought. "Harriet Lowe reallj 
is a mighty sweet girl. It's only that Lucia has taken some dislike tc 
her because she is poor and can not afford to dress as Lucia does. ] 
wish there was something I could do about it," and Betty's generoui 
little heart ached for Harriet when she received Lucia's note, for Har 
riet was so sensitive. 

Meanwhile Lucia is sitting in the little alcove curtained off fron 
the sitting room proper. In the little alcove girls go to write notes 
and read, and so here Lucia is busy at her note. 

Two girls enter the sitting room, sit down and begin to talk. 

"Oh, Harriet," says the taller of the two girls, "aren't you craz;y 
about going to the Senior reception ? I am so thrilled I can hardly 
speak. With whom are you going?" 

Harriet, who though somewhat plain in appearance has a wonder 
fully sweet face, replies: "Well, I should say I am crazy about it, anij 
Eleanor, whom do you suppose I am going with ? Why, of all the girls 
with whom I ever thought it heavenly to go anywhere, Lucia Knowles 
I think she is perfectly lovely and I am just so happy about it I don'' 
know what to do, and mother has sent me the dearest white chiffoi 
dress you ever saw to wear. Isn't that fine? 

Harriet's face fairly shone with admiration and with anticipatioi 
of her coming pleasure. 

Tears are in the eyes of a certain girl who stands in the curtainec 
alcove, and as she slowly tears up a piece of paper in her hands sh( 
says : ""Who could have thought it ? Why I think she is lovely." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 115 



SCHOOL GOSSIP 



SUSIE McIVER and LAURA MARGARET HOPPE, Editors 



Maie London and Mary Franklin Graves have had visits from their 

■thers. 

Katharine Lassiter's two brothers paid her a visit lately. 

Mrs. Webb came down from South Boston, Va., to see her two 
1 lighters. 

Sadie Williams (1911-'12), of Augusta, Ga., visited her friends 
re at school for several days. 

.'Mary Bryan Griswold spent a few days at home and since her re- 
rn has had a visit from her mother. 

;The many friends of Virginia Davis and Helen Patterson were all 
;rry to hear that they will not return to school this year. 

fBois Pugh and Elizabeth Gold have enjoyed visits from their 

thers. 

Carrie Cleaton, Helen Pride, and Margaret Jordan spent the week- 

d at their homes in Portsmouth. 

t 
We were glad to welcome two new girls this term: Arlene Joyner, 

] Greenville, and Etta Burte, of Trenton. 

jPlacide Clark, Julia Bond, Susie Mclver, and Elizabeth Tarry 
ive lately been home on visits. 

[J Mr. and Mrs. Underwood came up from Fayetteville in their ma- 
rine and after staying in the city a few days they took Janie back 
ith them for a short visit. 

Margaret Thomas and Penelope Gallup went home on account of 
skness. 

Helen Peoples and Mary Holton have had visits from their mothers. 

Clara Smith has had a visit from her brother. 

We all missed Mr. Lay very much when he paid a short visit to 

ew York. 
2 



116 The St. Maby's Muse. 

Mr. Paul Schenck has been down from Greensboro to see Missl 
Schenck. 

Mrs. Tom McNeil, of Lumberton, was at St. Mary's for a short! 
visit in March. Mrs. McNeil, then Miss Rosalie Williams, taught! 
music at St. Mary's in 1909-'10. 



It is Not Easy 



To apologize 
To begin over 
To be unselfish 
To take advice 
To admit error 
To face a sneer 
To be charitable 
To keep on trying 
To be considerate 
To avoid mistakes 
To endure success 
To keep out of the run 
To profit by mistakes 
To think and then act 
To forgive and forget 
To make the best of little 
To subdue an unruly temper 
To maintain a high standard 
To shoulder a deserved blame 
To recognize the silver lining 
BUT IT ALWAYS PAYS. 

— Selected. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN— CLIPPINGS 



Illustrious She 
She's a woman with a mission; 'tis her heaven-born ambition to reform the 

world's condition, you will please to understand. 
She's a model of propriety, a leader in society, and has a great variety of reme 

dies at hand. 
Each a sovereign specific, with a title scientific, for the cure of the morbific 

things that vex the people sore; 
For the swift alleviation of the evils of the Nation is her foreordained vocation 

on this sublunary shore. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 117 



.fie can lecture by the hour, with incomparable power, on the gloomy cloudy 
that lower o'er the country's fair domain, 

ad you weep for Eve and Adam, for the devil ne'er had had 'em if they'd only 
known the madam; and we'd all been proud of Cain. 

id while thus she's up and coming, always hurrying and humming, and occas- 
ionally slumming, this reformer of renown, 

er neglected little Dickey, ragged, dirty, tough and tricky, with his fingers 
soiled and sticky, is the terror of the town. 

— Chicago Tribune. 



Odd 

That we should speak of wading through a dry book. 

That one can make one's maiden proposal to a widow, 
i That a fellow can be in a girl's presence and yet be "gone." 

That the more we think of some people the less we think of them. 

That we often speak of folks being at odds when they are really trying to 
fet even. 

That the more people we get to help us keep a secret the sooner it gets away 
'om us. 

That saying a man is "capable of anything" is a very different thing from 
3commending him as thoroughly capable. — Boston Transcript. 



Smile, and the world smiles with you, 
"Knock," and you knock alone; 

For the cheerful grin 

Will let you in 
Where the kicker is never known. 

Growl, and the way looks dreary, 
Laugh, and the path is bright, 

For a welcome smile 

Brings sunshine, while 
A frown shuts out the light. 

Sing, and the world's harmonious, 
Grumble, and things go wrong, 

And all the time 

You are out of rhyme 
With the busy, bustling throng. 

Kick, and there's trouble brewing, 
Whistle, and life is gay; 

And the world's in tune 

Like a day in June 
And the clouds all melt away. — Selected. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year ■ = = a One Dollar 

Single Copies s « = = a Fifteen Cents. *. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. baleiqh, n. c. 



1' 






EDITORIAL STAFF 1912-1913. 

Caboline Clarke Jones, Editor-in-Chief. 

Julia Washington Allen, Mabt Brown Butler, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Ellen Abmistead Johnson, Susie McIver, Elise Gordon Stiles, 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry, Amy Conyers Winston. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, Business Manager. 

Myrtle Warren, Asst. Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL 



Easter 

The most beautiful time of the year at St. Mary's is now approach- 
ing — that of Easter and spring. Easter day is the most purely St. 
Mary's day of the year. The early service in the early morning is 
wonderful and there is a no more beautiful sight in the world than all 
of the girls in white going into chapel singing those wonderful Easter 
hymns. We wish you all a very happy and joyous Easter, and hope 
that all of the alumnse will on that day think of the Easters they have 
spent here. 



Sunday Musicale 

Sunday evening! the twilight hour when a boarding school girl' 
mind turns toward home and its sacred associations. Vesper service is 
over, the time is free until light bell and the girls must stay down 
stairs and engage in social intercourse until 7:30. What is more 
natural than that their thoughts should turn toward home at such a 
time, and that their conversation should arise from thoughts that are 
uppermost in the minds of all ? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 119 



Music hath charms to soothe the savage breast, and knowing this the 
embers of the Muse Club conceived the idea of a brief informal 
iusicale. Three of these delightful impromptu programs have been 
ven, and the girls now look forward eagerly to the hour that before 
.ey had dreaded. 

1 Mr. Owen and Miss Rowand, Marguerite Blakely, Gertrude Brig- 
am, Frances Sears and Jennie Bell Boy den have sung duets and solos, 
id last Sunday night Gertrude Brigham sang "The Angel's Serenade" 
ith a violin obligato by Agnes Reese. 
ISTo one can estimate the pleasure that has been given by the mem- 

ers of the Music Department, and many have expressed the wish 

aat the Sunday evening musicales may continue through the remainder 

f the year. 



The Commencement Marshals 

At recent meetings of the three Literary Societies the seven Com- 
nencement marshals were chosen. The Epsilon Alpha Pi had the 
lonor of electing the chief, who is Susie Mclver, '14, and her assist- 
ants from that society are Elise Stiles and Katharine Lassiter. From 
-he Sigma Lambda Society, the two elected are Sallie Hay ward, '14, 
[imd Myrtle Warren, '14. The new Alpha Rho Society selected Laura 
Olark, '14, and Elizabeth Tarry. 

c The Societies are to be congratulated on their selections, and the 
marshals have the good wishes of everyone. 



The Intersociety Debates 

On account of the newness of the Alpha Rho Society it was decided 
by all three Literary Societies that the annual intersociety debate 
should be between the Sigma Lambda and E. A. P. only. Both of 
these two societies have now elected their debaters. These are, for 
Sigma Lambda, Mary Butler and Lame Hales; for E. A. P., Julia 
Allen . and Julia Cooper. 



120 The St. Maby's Muse. 



The Bishop's Visitation 

On Palm Sunday, March. 16th, Bishop Cheshire made his annual 
visitation to St. Mary's, administering the rite of confirmation. On 
the Sunday before two girls were baptized at the morning service, ancj 
on Palm Sunday these two and two other girls formed the class con 
firmed by the Bishop. The chapel was simply decorated with palms, 
as is usual on this day, and the service was solemn and impressive. 
The sermon was by Bishop Cheshire. The girls who were confirmee 
were Avis Bissell, Bessie Burdine, Eleanor Calmes, Florence Clarke, 
Dorothy Fairley, Elizabeth Gold, Marion McMinn, Frances Pender, 
Elizabeth Smith, Elizabeth Waring, Cornelia Waring, Josephine 
Wilson. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ceuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorart Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(.Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President .... Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

Vice-President - 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 
rrm „ o™„„-,™,.„ T „„ /Miss Anna N. Butxon, Winston-Salem. 
Field Secretaries - - { Miss Annie Root, Raleigh. 

The Alumnae Play 

.On the evening of March 27 the Raleigh Chapter of St. Mary's 
lumnse will present the Piper, by Josephine Preston Peabody, in 
3 Raleigh Academy of Music. 

'All who are interested in St. Mary's will remember the success of 
it year's play, "You Never Can Tell," given under the same auspices 

is this play, and will welcome the "Piper" the more heartily on 
at account. The "Piper" is the story of the "Pied Piper of Hame- 
t," made into a touching and exquisite drama by Mrs. Peabody. 
'Mrs. George Royal takes the leading part, the "Piper," and has 
ren much thought and study to the preparation of her role. Mrs. 
j>yal is a graduate of Smith College, and while there was a leader in 
[lege dramatics. She has appeared several times before in ama- 
nr plays in Raleigh, so all who have seen her know that they may 
pect an intelligent and charming interpretation. 
(Mrs. Ashe, the President of the Raleigh Chapter, has given many 
ieks to the supervising of this play, and assisted by Mr. Owen, Mrs. 
)bards, Mrs. C. L. Mann, and others, it seems certain to go beyond 
3 success even of last year's play. 

The Alumnas Association doubtless understands that the profits from 
3 play go to the Alumnae Scholarships, and will be heartily interested 

securing as large an attendance as possible on the 27th. It is 
Decially urged that as many members of the Raleigh Chapter as pos- 
)le attend that night, and that they bring friends and acquaintances, 
le evening is to be a gala one, and nothing will be spared in making 
3 occasion a delightful one. 



122 The St. Maby's Muse. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Ha rriss— Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Earl Johnson 
request the honor of 
your presence at the marriage of their daughter 
Fanny Hines 
to 
Mr. Meares Harriss 
on the evening of Wednesday, the twenty-sixth of March 
at six o'clock 
at Christ Church 
Raleigh, North Carolina 
Will he at home after the tenth of April 
Carolina Heights 
Wilmington, North Carolina 

Miss Johnson, as a daughter of one of our resident trustees and 
niece of Mrs. Iredell, as well as a St. Mary's girl, seems especiall 
near to St. Mary's. It was with great interest that The Muse receive* 
the invitation to her wedding, and it now offers her sincere good wishe 
in her new life. 



F^EAD !— MARK I— ACT 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
[ers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
;.ciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
dvertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
r loss, not ours. 



igh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 
Ready'tO'Wear Garments 
Ten per cent off to College Girls. 



le Jf asfyton 



Fayetteville 
Street 



French 
Hat Shop 



Exclusive 
Millinery 



Further Studies in English 



THE GALLANT SWUESNB. 

A gallant young man of Tuquesne 
Went home with a girl in the ruesne; 

She said with a sigh, 

"I wonder when Igh 
Shall see such a rain-beau aguesne." — Ex. 



E DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF AIvI, KINDS 
MILLINERY 



lored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

DIES' FINE SHOES ATTO SLIPPERS 



' It's worth the difference ' 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Established 1S58 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY I 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 

COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

WE SELL, GOSSARD'S LACE 

FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



M 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOTS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



A BRAVE GIRL. 

She had on her finger a felon, 

She went to the doctor, did Helon. 

Said he, "Does it hurt?" 

The girl replied: "Cert, 
But I haven't done any yellon." 

— Denver Post. 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

The 
MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGC 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 



Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Advertisements. 



Mlege GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

e OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 

and Power 

f 174 
Both Phones :< 2 or 



LLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Special 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 

it Suits, School Dresses, Evening - Costumes, Waists, Coats, and Accessory Lines 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trimmings, Gloves, Hosiery, Laces, Notions, Etc. 



cKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. 



Fayetteville St. 



C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds oi Keys Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 



A newly captured horse thief, 

Dangling from a tree, 
In a hoarse whisper murmured, 

"This suspense is killing me." — Ex. 

• 


iKING'S GROCERY 
"The Little Store" 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 


IMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 




HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 




ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 




Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescript! onist 



Good Things Always at 



BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 

124 Fayetteville Street 



Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
118 E.Davie Street Raleigh N. C. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Street 






ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capita 

Safe, Secure and Successful 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON 



President. 
G. H. DORTCH, 

Secretary. 



Treasurer. 
R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. d 



The Sophomores saw a patch of green, 
They thought it was the Freshman class, 

But when they nearer drew 
They saw it was a looking glass. — Ex. 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



ijIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
Wake Drug- Store. Phones 228 



(S' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE 
Prompt Delivery 



Phones 107 



Illy & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 



PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 

DGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 

4.RNELL & THOMAS 

MUSIC HOUSE 

WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
II Harrington Street Phone 941 M 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything In Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties. 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

J. R. FEEEALL <fc CO.— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 
222 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 

WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 COR. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS 



Then into the air he leaped, his joyous course he bore 
Straight to that sheet of Tanglefoot and waded in once more. 
A fly is just an insect and his part in life is small, 
Yet exactly like a man he does things, after all. — Ex. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

Mew Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

1 NORFOLK »™™» 

iium ulii QOLDSBORO 

Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
[ AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



w. CROXTON, 
Traffic Manager, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. UPCHURCH, 

General Ag-ent, RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail ordersjsolicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located 
at hi3 new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th ai 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing t 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverwai 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and importi 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable n 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparii 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades 

perry's art store 

S. Wilming-ton Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicit 

THE MECHANICS SAVING BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Calendar for March 



March 13. Pupils' Recital in Auditorium. 

March 16. Palm Sunday, Confirmation. 

March 17-22. Holy Week. 

March 21. Good Friday. Holy Day. 

March 23. Easter Sunday. 

March 24. Easter Egg Party. 

March 27. Alumna? Play, Academy of Music. 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

All Our Work Done by The Goodyear Welt System 
104 E. Harg-ett Street 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establlshmei 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 

204 S. Salisbury Street 



THE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A. & M. 
Athletic Association. $1.50 per year. Walter 
C. Taylor, Bus. Mgr., West Raleigh, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 



TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishing 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 

Personal attention to mail orders. Bell Phone 43 



BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST DRY GOOD STORE 

Come and See Us in Our New Home 

Everything: for Woman's "Wear. Ready-to- Wear Garments of all Kinds 



Advertisements 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 

Premier Carrier of the South 

Most Direct Line to All Points 

NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST 

Through sleeping cars to all principal cities; through Tourist 
Cars to San Francisco and other California points. All- 
year Tourist tickets on sale to principal Western points. 
Convenient local, as well as through trains. Electrically 
lighted coaches. Complete Dining Car Service on all 
through trains. Ask representatives of Southern Railway 
about special rates account Christmas holidays; also various 
other special occasions. If you are contemplating a trip to 
any point, communicate with representatives of Southern 
Railway before completing your arrangements for same. 
They will gladly and courteously furnish you with all infor- 
mation as to the cheapest and most comfortable way in 
which to make the trip. Will also be glad to secure Pull- 
man Sleeping Car reservations for you. 

F. CARY, General Passenger Agent, J. O. JONES, Traveling Passenger Agent 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



&J)e 



g>t Jttarp's JWuae 



april, 1913 




fcalttgf), Ji C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Vol. XVI3: April, 1913. No. 7 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



MARY BROWN BUTLER and JULIA WASHINGTON ALLEN, Editors 



Nag's Head 



Elizabeth Peele White. 



Nag's Head is a long strip of ranch land running for fifty or sixty 
miles down the coast of North Carolina ; on one side it is bounded by the 
Atlantic Ocean and on the other side by Albemarle Sound. The land 
is mostly sand, which the wind from these two bodies of water has 
piled into high hills — sometimes as high as seventy-five feet. The hills 
extend all the way up the peninsula. These hills change every year, 
becoming higher, steeper or lower according to the way the winds blow, 
and sometimes it looks as if the whole hill had moved. Some distance 
up are a number of fresh ponds, in which both salt and fresh water fish 
are found, such as garfish, chub and perch. There are numerous theo- 
iries as to how these ponds originated, but the generally accepted theory 
is that they were springs of fresh water gradually cut off from the 
ocean by the rising sands and that by this gradual change the fish of 
the fresh and salt water adapted themselves so slowly to the necessary 
change that they were able to survive. On the hills around these ponds 
there is almost the grandeur of mountain scenery — as the hills are very 
high and are covered with trees, vines and wild flowers of various sorts ; 
and the road winds up and down and around them in a most picturesque 
manner, sometimes along the side of a high precipice and at other times 
at the foot of a towering hill. One gradually emerges from this moun- 
tain scenery to the bare sand hills overlooking vast bodies of water ; 
along the banks are the houses of the Bankers, with their clothes on 



124 The St. Mart's Muse. 



the line and their fishing nets drying in the sun, while they lounge 
around in the shade of the house smoking long-stemmed corn-cob pipes ; 
and the often very dirty little children play on the beach. 

Nag's Head, which is now a summer resort of some renown, got its 
name a number of years ago from the old seamen who called this poin^, 
Nag's Head because a band of pirates led by the notorious Black Beard 
used to hang lanterns to the heads of banker ponies or nags and let 
them wander up and down the beach on dark nights so that the ships 
passing at sea along the dangerous shoals off the coast would think the 
lights on the nag's head were ships farther in and hence come in and 
be wrecked on the shoals. The pirates would then take the ship, make 
the inmates "walk the plank" and help themselves to whatever they 
wanted on the ship. There are still in Elizabeth City, not far from 
Nag's Head, a few of the relics of those bold exploits — the most prized 
of which is a large, very beautifuly handpainted portrait of the famous 
beauty, Theodosia Burr. Tradition says that she was made to "walk the 
plank" by Black Beard and his band while on her way south to meet her 
father, to whom she was taking the portrait. The picture hung for a 
long time in the house of one of the Bankers at the Head who a few years 
ago gave it to the present owner for kindnesses he had received at his 
hands. 

It was here from the summit of Kill Devil Hill that the Wright 
Brothers first tried their aeroplane. The old rusted out aeroplane, or, 
rather what of it has not been taken away by curious people is still to 
be seen on Kill Devil by any one who is willing to climb that steep, 
soft sand hill under a hot, burning sun. 

Nag's Head has yet another claim on our interests, outside of its 
natural attraction as a summer resort of no common nature — for no- 
where are people as free from the conventionalities of society as they 
are here. Two or three summers ago one of the "resorters" while on 
an exploring expedition up in the hills came upon what he took to be 
the remains of an old Indian village. It happened that he knew some- 
thing about pottery and china ; hence he noticed certain peculiarities 
about some that he found there, and on some of it he saw marks which 
he afterwards learned to be the trademarks of English potters about the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 125 

;ime of Raleigh's attempts to found a colony at Roanoke Island (which is 
separated from Nag's Head by a narrow strip of Albemarle Sound). 
This aroused his curiosity and interest, and after much careful study of 
Mthe situation and from other facts that he was able to learn, he and 
E quite a number of people are convinced that this is where the lost col- 
f'i'ony settled. While their proof may not be sufficient for accepting this 
el theory there is nothing that they have been able to find that tends to 
pf disprove it ; but they are still working in hopes of finding a conclusive 
wproof. 

1$) Thus it is that Nag's Head — a seeming heap of uninteresting hot, 
mwhite sand, has in reality no little attraction for us in its natural beauty 
wand historical interest. 



Home Again 



Annie Cameron. 



My, what a rush ! The slim black-clad figure was completely hidden 
under the crowd of six sturdy youngsters all crowding to kiss mother, 
hug her 'round the neck, hang on to her skirts and snatch away her 
bundles ! 

Then began the triumphant entry into the house with Bob helping 

mother up the steps and Nancy running ahead to hold open the door, 

''while the twins fought over the hand-bag and umbrella and Tommy 

'from his vantage-ground in mother's arm shouted and crowed. Nor 

was the escort satisfied 'till their charge was comfortably seated in the 

t'i dining-room where they waited with suppressed excitement to see if 

she would notice all their little preparations. There was the vase of 

ij f early spring flowers that the twins had scoured the neighboring woods 

n j and fields to find, the roaring fire Bob had made and the dainty tea- 

p table Nancy had arranged with such care, and last but by no means 

• least, the frosted cake they had all clubbed together to buy to celebrate 

- mother's homecoming. Yes, she was certainly right when she said it 

l was worth while going away just to have such a warm reception. 

And what a time they had with mother at the head of the table an- 



126 The St. Maby's Muse. 



swering hundreds of questions and everybody talking at once. "They 
had just missed her awfully" ! "Yes, they had all kept well except 
Kancy cut her finger, but it was better." "The flowers down by the 
garden wall were blooming and oh ! they had found a new hen-nest with 
nine eggs in it" ! Then "mother, aren't you awfully tired ?" "Did 
you have a nice time at Aunt Lucy's ?" and so on, the conversation 
broken now and then by "Oh," and "How grand" ! as mother told of 
her many pleasant experiences. There is no telling how long they 
would have talked had not Tommy fallen asleep and knocked over the 
tea-pot ; a sure sign that it was time for everyone to go to bed. 



Getting the Mail 

( An Everyday Sketch.) 



Elizabeth Andeeson Tabby. 



"Why does Miss S — insist on making us stay in here all this time, 
just because some one made a little noise ?" whispers some one in the 
back of the schoolroom, at assembly from chapel. How can she have 
the heart to make us wait in here, when she sees our looks of longing 
and anxiety only "to get our mail ?" Soon, however, the "spirit moves 
her," and she taps the bell. My ! Such a hustle to get there first ! 
Anyone in the way between Main Building and East Rock doesn't 
have to be told to move aside. 

"I wish those girls wouldn't push through the line to see if they 
have any mail. Why don't they get in line and go around ?" 

"That's what I say, Katherine ; think of the time they'd save. And 
all those toes that are stepped on would be spared ! It frets me no lit- 
tle," murmurs Janie, as she settles back against the wall. 

"Oh, you 'Fudger' ! I don't think it's fair to save places ! She 
certainly ought to run for herself," whispers Nellie in a lower tone to 
the girl in front of her. 

How slowly the line moves ! It seems as if I'll never get to the win- 
dow. "What?" mumbles Sallie, "Do you mean to say I haven't any 
mail today, either ? I guess everybody has forgotten me. I didn't 



; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 127 

aspect to hear from home, as there's no one there except mother and 
cather. They never write me unless somebody gets married or dies; 
ind there's not much danger of their 're-tying the knot' !" And Sallie 
: dowry makes her way out of East Rock. 

"You, Mary, go right back and come in the right door! Then you 
lean have your mail ; I have a good mind not to give it to you at all," 
says Miss Sutton in a commanding tone, and somewhat out of patience. 

"I haven't any," Mary replies in a satisfied tone, as though for one 
iime she was glad she didn't, just to get even with Miss Sutton. 

"What's the matter up there % Everybody buying stamps ? Well, I 
might have known it. I'll declare ! I have three whole letters ; and I've 
)een waiting back yonder all this time ! But here I am at last. 177, 
Miss Sutton, please." 



Morning in the Dormitory 



Maey Floyd. 



"Oh, don't tell me that's the bell ! I never was so sleepy in my life. 
I vow, if I ever get home again, I am going to sleep a week." 

"I'm with you," says another girl. 

"I wish you girls would hush; I want to sleep for these ten 
minutes." 

A short time and then someone calls out, "Fifteen minutes past, 
girls," and my! What a scramble follows. 

"Elizabeth, please lend me your red tie this morning. You aren't 
f^oing to wear it, are you ?" 

;. A lapse of a few minutes and then the bell rings for breakfast. And 
then the cries that are heard ! 

"My goodness ! You surely don't mean that that's the breakfast 
bell." 

"Oh, what will I do! I'm not half ready." 

Then what a mad rush for the dining room! A few get there and 
slip past Sydney and the doors are closed. The belated ones pause 
outside to straighten hair ribbons and to button those buttons which 
in the hurry had been left unbuttoned. 
3 



128 The St. Mary's Muse. 



"Well, I declare, if I'm late many more times, I'll be restricted 
How many mornings does this make, anyway?" 

"I have had to go to detention nearly every day this week. By 
the time you've been as often as I have, you won't mind it." 

But now the doors are reopened and the unfortunate late ones hurry 
to their places. 

SCHOOL NEWS 



ELLEN ARMISTEAD JOHNSON and ELIZABETH ANDERSON TARRY, Editors 



March 27 

Promptly at eight p. m. on March 27th the "big bell" rang to assem- 
ble the girls who were to go to the "Piper," the long-anticipated and 
much talked of play, given by St. Mary's Alumnae. 

Of course they were much interested as they recognized some of the 
"stars" as members of the faculty. Miss Hayward as "Barbara" was 
one of the leading characters, and she acted her part, that of a pretty 
maiden, skilled in the art of coquetry, very well indeed. More comely 
dancers were never seen than Miss Urquhart and Miss Shattuck, the 
wives of two of the villagers of Hamelin. The scenery was beautiful, 
and all of the acting, to use the school girls' term, was "just fine," 

The girls were indeed sorry when the curtain fell for the last time, 
and they had to leave the enchantment of the "Piper" and resume 
their "bell" life. 

The iDrogram i s given below: 

The Piper Nina Almirall Roy all 

Michael-the-Sword-Eater William Roy all 

Cheat-the-Devil Donald C. South 

Jacobus, the Burgomeister James P. Brawley 

Kurt, the Syndic Edward H. Markison 

Peter, the Cobbler Thomas L. Bayne, Jr. 

Hans, the Butcher Colin G. Spencer 

Axel, the Smith Paul Pittinger 

Martin, the Watch Joseph B. Cheshire, Jr. 

Peter, the Sacristan Thomas L. Bayne, Jr. 

Anselm, a young priest Willis G. Peace 

Old Claus, a miser Ed. H. King 

Town Crier Joseph B. Cheshire, Jr. 



'. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 129 

r eronika, the wife of Kurt Dorothy Dustan Peace 

Jarbara, daughter of Jacobus Mary Sully Hayward 

Vife of Hans, the Butcher Helen Urqtjhart 

Vife of Axel, the Smith Margaret Rogers 

Vife of Martin, the Watch Blanche E. Shattuck 

?Hd Ursula Lucy West Litchford 

an Virginia Page Royster 

lansel Agatha Heritage Knox 

lse Laura Love Thompson 

tudi Ethel Norris Marshall 

Villagers of Hamelin — Ellen Dortch, Annie Root, Mary Armistead Jones, 
Lldert Root, Garland Jones, Henry Turner, Thomas Nichols. 

i Children — Anna Ball Thomas, Margaret Raney, Isabelle Jones, Mary Wilson, 
slartina Carr, Martha Galloway, Adelaide Boylston, Kathrine Baker, Elizabeth 
Maker, Jane Grimes, Harriet Barber, Dorothy O'Donnell, Mary Batchelor, Mary 
bloke, Mary Peace, Annie V. Ward, Elizabeth Flint, Frances Tucker, Corine 
iosenthal, Charlotte Johnson, Mary Strange Morgan, Wyndham Ashe. 

March 28— Mr. Bonci's Recital 

St. Mary's girls will long remember the recital given by Mr. Bonci in 
s'he downtown auditorium. 

I Mr. Bonci has a beautiful tenor voice, under perfect control. From 
'•in artistic standpoint his performance left nothing to be desired. He 
i7'as enthusiastically received, and was recalled many times. 

April 5— Junior Party to the Seniors 

Everyone has been lovely about entertaining the seniors, but I am 
ture that none of us, in all the time we have been at St. Mary's, could 
Lave enjoyed ourselves more than at the party given us by the Class of 
j.14. It really deserves the name of a full-fledged "banquet." The 
skbles were set for thirty-four people, and most attractively set, too. 
They were arranged in a hollow square and each place was marked 
I irith a bunch of violets, our class flower — and the cutest of place cards. 
j'he supper carried the black and gold of '14 and the lavendar and 
5 urple of '13 through six courses in either decorations or ices — but 
yen that delightful supper was not the nicest part. All during the 
.ourses attractive songs and recitations were contributed by Elizabeth 
? T arry, Agnes Beese, Jennie Bell Boyden and Gertrude Brigham, and 
it the end a "Jack-Horner-Pie" was opened within which were thir- 
ien tiny dolls, dressed to represent the vocation of each senior. These 



130 The St. Mary's Muse. 



were splendid, from Jennie's lawyer to Caroline's soubrette, as wer< 
the verses with which Miss Bottum presented them. At the last manj 
toasts were given and we all left feeling eternally grateful to the clas 
of 1914 for an ideal party. The detail of the party, including the 
menu, is given: 

(Preliminary: Graphophone Selections.) 

Course I — Hors d'oeuvre Sardines, Olives, Parsley, Saltine 

(1. Graphophone Selections.) 
Course II — Chef d'oeuvre — Creamed Chicken in Pates, Cheese Balls, Beatei 
Biscuit, Ice Tea. 

(2. Song of "Welcome. J. Boyden, E. Tarry with guitar.) 

Course III — Salad Tomato with Mayonnaise on Lettue 

(3. Monologue — Wege. E. Tarry, A. Reese, assisting.) 

Course IV — Dessert Strawberries with Whipped Crean 

(4. Glee Trio in Repertoire. E. Tarry, G. Brigham, A. Reese.) 
(a: Mashes.) 
(b: Crunch, crunch.) 
(c: O Caroline.) 
(d: O gee, gee. Two verses.) 

Course V — Ice Orange Ice, Chocolate Wafer 

(5. Prophecy Pie — Miss Bottum.) 
Course VI — Toasts. 

(6. Toast to Seniors — M. Warren. Response — C. Jones.) 
Finale: Alma Mater. All standing. 

April 8— Mr. Stone Entertains the Seniors 

On Tuesday, April 8th, the Seniors were delightfully entertainei 
"by Mr. Stone, their class adviser. After all had arrived and duly ap 
predated the lovely open fires, a literary guessing contest was held h 
which Bessie White won the prize, a dainty hat pin holder. A littl 
later upon entering the softly lighted dining-room, the Seniors foun 
an apt verse marking each place. Six o'clock came all too soon but th 
Seniors returned on time and became the envy of each St. Mary's gii 
who heard the delightful afternoon described. 

April 9— Mr. South's Recital 

We were delightfully entertained on the evening of April 9th by 
song recital given by Mr. Donald C. South, a pupil of Mr. Owen, i] 
the school auditorium. He was assisted by Francisca King who ref 
dered several piano numbers in a thoroughly artistic manner, and botl 
Mr. South and Francisca acquitted themselves in a way which wa 






: ; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 131 

iireditable both to themselves and to the schood. The program was as 

ollows : 

>) 
— Aria from "The Creation" Haydn 

— Valse Romantique, op. 115 Chaminade 

Miss King. 

Two Songs from the Cycle — "The Morning of the Year" Cadman 

— Aria "Infelice" Verdi 

— (a) Springtanz Grieg 

(b) Golliwogs' Cake Walk Debussy 

(c) Les Spectres Schytte 

Miss King. 
— (a) "A Maid Sings Light" MacDowell 

(b) "The Spring Has Come" White 

(c) "Back to Ireland" Huhn 

April 14— Sarah Fanner's Recital 

The second piano recital of the year was given on Monday evening, 
.pril 14th, by Sarah Fenner, diploma pupil of Miss Hart. Mr. Don- 
Id C. South very ably assisted her. Both performers did excellent 
ork. The pianiste's faultless technique showed throughout her en- 
re programme, but especially so in Weber's "Perpetual Motion," and 
XacDowell's "Witches Dance" — all of her numbers were greeted by 
iorms of applause, and she received many beautiful flowers which 
fere an evidence of her popularity here at St. Mary's and in the town, 
[the following was the program: 

i — Sonata in D Minor (First Movement) Beethoven 

] — Perpetual Motion (Finale from Sonata, in C Major) Weber 

Recitative and Aria, "Herodiade" Massenet 

Mr. South. 
— (a) Prelude, in C Minor ^ 

(b) Nocturne, in B Major > Chopin 

(c) Military Polonaise J 

—(a) "When?" Thomas 

(b) "The Sea Hath a Hundred Moods" Cadman 

(c) "When Love is Dead" Paston-Cooper 

—"In Autumn" Moszkowski 

Mr. South. 

.-(a) No. 4 from "Marionettes" 1 MacDowell 

(b) Witches' Dance | 

|) } 

it 



132 The St. Mary's Muse. 



April 19— Muse Club Lawn Party 

A combination of the full moon, a sea-like breeze, Japanese lanterns, 
tables conveniently placed, and last, but by no means least, the crowc 
of happy girls made the lawn party, given in front of Clement Hall 
on Saturday night, April 19th, a delightful occasion indeed. 

At this party, which was given by the Muse Club, for the benefi] 
of the Annual Muse, chicken salad, pimento and cheese sandwiches, 
welsh rarebit, ice cream and sherbet were in great demand, as wasj 
shown by the frequent calls for "waiters," and the vigorous way ii 
which they had to "hustle" to fill each demand. The sale of delicacies 
continued until nine-thirty, when it was pronounced a decided success 
and a great help to the Muse. 

April 21— Piano Recital — Caroline A. Lockhart 

The following account taken from the News and Observer gives ar 
adequate account of Lina Lockhart' s recital on Monday evening, Apri 
21. The program is also given: 

Miss Lina Ashe Lockhart gave a delightful program at her certificate pian< 
recital last evening in St. Mary's Auditorium. The Strauss "Sonata" was playe( 
with intelligence and with good phrasing; the MacDowell number, "Praeludium,' 
and "Fugue," from First Modern Suite, revealed taste and musical appreciation 
while the "Clair de Lune" of Debussy was probably the most artistic piece o 
work on the program. 

Miss Lockhart is a pupil of Mr. Owen. Miss Lockhart was ably assisted bj 
Miss Jennie Belle Boyden, whose sweet, clear soprano voice gave much pleasun 
in three selections, "Where Sunshine Grows," by Helen Brown; "Way Dowi 
South," by Victor Harris; and "I Love Thee," by Hammond. 

Saar's "Spring" was exquisitely sung by fresh young voices well trained an< 
beautifully blended — Miss Arlene Joyner, Miss Gertrude Brigham, and Misi 
Marian Stanford. 

PROGRAM. 

1. — Sonata, op 5 (Allegro Vivo) Richard Strausi 

2.— (a) "Where Sunshine Grows." Brow\ 

(b) "Way Down South" Victor Harri 

(c) "I Love Thee" Hammoni 

Miss Boyden. 

3. — First Modern Suite, op 10 ^ 

(a) Praeludium. V MacDowel 

(b) Fugue. j 

4.— Spring £«« 

Misses Joyner, Brigham, and Stanford. 



s 



The St. Mary's Muse. 133 

;.— (a) Clair de Lune Debussy 

(b) A Wind Flower (left-hand study) Woodruff 

(c) Staccato Etude, op 37 Friml 

April 26— Physical Training Exhibition 

On Saturday, April 26, at eight, the whole school and a number of 
Wtside friends met in the gymnasium where they spent a most delight- 
ful evening, entertained by Miss Davis' classes in Physical Culture. 
f There were a number of unique and interesting features to the enter- 
tainment, perhaps the most attractive being Folkdances by the Pri- 
mary and Preparatory grades, and Swedish dancing by the older girls, 
'n Swedish costume. The vertical rope climbing was also very inter- 
isting, both the children and the older girls taking turns climbing up 
md down with astonishing skill. The program which was varied and 
ittractive is given: 

— Free-Hand Gymnastics. 

Marching. 
— Folk-lore Dances — I See You, Carrousel (Merry-Go-Round), Washing the 
Clothes. 

Game — Hop-Tag. 

Primary Grade. 
— Vertical Rope Climbing. 
1 — Game — Progressive Dodgeball. 
— Folk-lore Dances Mt. March, Kinder Polka 

Free-Hand Gymnastics. 

Vertical Rope Climbing. 

Game — Teacher. 

Sub-Preparatory. 
— Figure Marching — Swedish Costume. 

Folk-lore Dances Ace of Diamonds, Klappdans 

— Jumping. 
— Dash. 

— Folk-lore Dance (Chebogan) 

'). — Game — Potato Spoon Race. 

|| — Folk-lore Dance (Reap the Flax) 

h 

i ■ 



134 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL GOSSIP 



LAURA MARGARET HOPPE and SUSIE McIVER, Editors 



We are glad to know that Placide Clark, who was obliged to go 
home on account of her health, is back at school again. 

Many of the girls went home for the week-end during the month ol 
April. 1 1 *il| 

Edith Clark's mother spent a few days with her recently. 

Flora Lewis has had a visit from her sister. 

Katharine Lassiter has had a visit from her father and brother. 

Francesca King has had a visit from her mother. 

Mrs. Brigham and her younger daughter, Helen, stopped over to set 
Gertrude on their way north. 

The friends of Dorothy Hopkins will be sorry to learn that she wii 
not return to school this year. 

Beverly DuBose (19 10-' 12), spent a few days at St. Mary's during 
the week of April 13. She was returning from the Chapel Hill dances 
and her many friends here were delighted to have her stop by on he: 
way home. 

Sadie Williams (1911-'12), visited her friends at school for a week 
end during April. 

Everyone is glad to see Annie Cameron out again after an attack o 
German measles. 

Jennie Woodruff spent the week-end, April 19-22, in Wilmington 
Before leaving, she had as her guest for several days, Miss Lowe, o: 
Wilmington. 

Mary Floyd's sister was with her for Easter. 

Rosalie Wilkinson has had a visit from her mother. 

Mary Franklin Graves is at home for several weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery, from Spartanburg, have been up to visi 
Kate Lois. 

Myrtle Warren went home for a week for her health. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 135 

Sophronia and Julia Cooper and Amy Winston spent a few days in 
Oxford where they attended the wedding of Mary Cooper (1905-'06), 
the older sister of Sophronia and Julia. 

Rebecca Kyle spent a week-end at her home in Norfolk and re- 
, turned accompanied by her mother. 

Matilda Hancock went home on account of sickness in her family, 
; but we are glad to have her back with us again. 



FACULTY NOTES 



Mr. Henry Lay, of Telluride, Colorado, brother of the rector, who 
has spent the spring at St. Mary's, left for Colorado on the 18th of April. 
1 While Mr. Lay was here, another brother, Mr. Bierne Lay, of Concord, 
I !New Hampshire, and a friend of the family, Mr. Howard, also of Con- 
cord, spent several days very pleasantly at St. Mary's. 

Mrs. Lay's mother, Mrs. Balch, who has spent the winter at St. 
* Mary's, left for Washington in April. 

Mr. Lay spent several days in Richmond at an educational meeting, 
April 15-19. 

Miss Schenck spent the week-end, April 12-14, at her home in Greens- 
I boro. 

Mr. Cruikshank was in Baltimore a few days on business the latter 
] part of April. 

Miss Rowand paid a week's visit at her home in Providence, R. I. 
Miss Davis spent April 3 and 4 in Sanford, !N". C, where she gave a 
recital. 

Miss Dowd and Mr. Owen were in Chapel Hill, April 5-8, where 
Mr. Owen, with Miss Dumais of Peace Institute, gave a recital. 

Mrs. Archibald Henderson, of Chapel Hill, spent several days with 
Mrs. Cruikshank in April. 



136 The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN-CLIPPINGS 



The Freshman 
The Freshman is not wise at all, 
His head is like a basketball, 

But not so good; 
The ball is pumped up full of air, 
A Freshman's head is not — I swear — 
There's nothing but a vacuum there, 

Walled in with wood. 

The Freshman is a growing thing, 
Like the growing things of spring — 

So green and good; 
And if he grows and grows some more, 
'Twill not be very long before 
He'll be a fullgrown Sophomore — 

Just as he should. 



ACT I. 

I'm only in the Freshman year, 
Will I ever get through? 

I feel like shedding many tears, 
But, goodness, that won't do. 



And now I am a Sophomore, 
A somewhat higher class; 

O French is sure a heavy bore, 
I hope this year will pass. 



But now I'm in the Junior year, 
O how the time did fly; 

The time is coming soon, I fear, 
When I will have to sigh. 

ACT IV. 

And now I hold my head up high, 
My thoughts are even keener, 

No longer o'er my work I cry, 
For I am now a Senior. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13T 

The maiden sweet, at seventeen, 

Bewails her chaperone, 
And wonders if she'll ever be 

Entirely alone. 
The maiden fine at thirty-one, 

Is utterly alone, 
And now she'd give her head to live 

With one dear "chap-er-own." 



I cad dot sig a sog todight; 
I could dot sig if I should try, 
By reasod you'd scarce deed he told, 
Is because I've got too bad a cold. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year = = s a One Dollar. 

Single Copies = * % a a Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1912-1913. 

Caroline Clarke Jones, Editor-in-Chief. 

Julia Washington Allen, Mart Brown Butler, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Ellen Armistead Johnson, Susie McIver, Elise Gordon Stiles, 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry, Amy Conters Winston. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, Business Manager. 

Myrtle Warren, Asst. Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL 



Spring at St, Mary's 

None of us realize how absolutely beautiful and wonderful the grove 
is until the trees all come out in the spring. Now the grove is nice 
and shady and as the weather is getting warm everyone sits in the 
grove and enjoys the cool breezes. At night after chapel it is light 
enough to walk around the grove and to sit on the benches and enjoy 
the sunsets. Then the St. Mary's Band adds much to these spring 
nights. The band plays all of those old familiar songs that we have 
all been raised on and every one enjoys fully that short half-hour be- 
fore study hall. 



The Debate 

As the time approaches for the inter-society debate we all get sud- 
denly filled with Sigma Lambda and E. Q. P. enthusiasm. Now all of 
the girls are wearing the colors of the two societies and the Alpha 
Rho's are wearing ether they want to. We hear frequently discussions 
about which side will win and everyone in school is waiting, not pa- 
tiently, for the third of May. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Eenest Cruikshank --- - Alumnse Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnse Association. 

Honoeaet President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

[Mtb. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honoeart Vice-Presidents - ■< Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President - - Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

Vice-President - 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 
t? tt ,„~ q™„™ „ ™ /Miss Anna N. Butxon, Winston-Salem. 
Field Secretaries ■ - { Miss Annie Root, Raleigh. 

"The Piper" 

All the Alumnse will be interested to know that the "Piper," by 
Mrs. Peabody, given on March 27 by the Raleigh Chapter for the Alum- 
nse Scholarship was highly successful, both from an artistic and a 
financial standpoint. Though the expenses for such an elaborate pro- 
duction were necessarily large, over $250 was cleared. 

We will not give an account of the play, but for those who are un- 
familiar with it, we print the following prologue, which was prepared 
by members of the cast, and which gives an adequate idea of the plot: 

Good Friends: — As far as our poor powers permit, we are to portray for your 
entertainment, and may we hope, profit, the German town of Hamelin on the 
Weser, a smug, self-satisfied, money-grasping town; a greedy, penurious town, 
whose pettiness and narrowness provide the cause which leads to its downfall, 
and, through it, to its final salvation. The Pied Piper, having rid the city of a 
•plague of rats, returns with his company of strolling players and demands the 
thousand guilders which have been promised him for his services. The miserly 
iburghers offer him fifteen and, upon his refusal, deny him any further satisfac- 
tion. In revenge, he pipes away their children, all save the Burgomeister's 
daughter, hiding them in a hollow cave outside the town. She, forced by the 
townsfolk to be vowed to the church as a penance for their sins, he saves and 
gives to her lover Michael, and they are married. 

Moved by the pleading of the wife of Kurt the Councilor, who has come to 
look for her lame son Jan, he attempts to justify himself to the Lonely Man, but 
fails, and finally, overborn, agrees to return the children. Returning to Hamelin, 
he finds a chastened and repentant city, deep in gloom and despair, which he 
dispels with the laughter and sunshine of childish faces, and so leaves, once 
more taking to the high road with his company of players. Friends, we present 
to you the town of Hamelin on the Weser. 



140 The St. Mary's Muse. 



* 



We also give an account of the play which appeared next day in the 

Raleigh Times: 

Noble in its lines, subtle and tender in its interpretation, "Tbe Piper" at the 
Academy of Music last evening charmed the largest and most cultured audience 
of the season. It was a poetic version of the old familiar story of the Pied Piper 
of Hamelin, given under the auspices of St. Mary's Alumnae. The name of Mr. 
R. Blinn Owen leads one to expect much, and this production, under his dramatic 
management, backed by the competent efforts of the executive committee — Mrs. 
Thos. Ashe, Mrs. Watkins Robards, and Mrs. D. Elias — and the efficient support 
of Mr. Paul Pittenger as master of the properties, more than fulfilled all expecta- 
tions. The prologue was delivered by Mr. Donald C. South who, in the play was 
Cheat-the-Devil, a light and airy son of Thespius, who might have stepped from 
out a rich canvas by an old-time master. 

Nina Almirall Royall, as The Piper, was the very embodiment of that unfet- 
tered spirit, disdainful of conventions, greed and smugness. Graceful and glad I 
as an uncaged bird, not only the children but the audience was led captive by the I 
spell of her witchery. I 

Dorothy Dustan Peace made an exquisitely appealing Veronika. Her voice I 
thrilled like the notes of a harp as she implored for the return of her little lame 
son, wistfully interpreted by Virginia Royster. As it often happens that an actor 
does not look the part (every one has seen a florid matron who would persuade 
us that she is the dying Camille, or a husky athlete, who never lost a night's 
sleep, engaging to portray the tortured Prince of Denmark), it satisfied one's 
sense of fitness that Veronika was the living embodiment of the Piper's words, 
"O woman, you are very beautiful!" 

A gayer note was introduced by the pretty scenes between Michael, the Sword 
Swallower, played by Mr. William Royall, and pretty, winsome Barbara, im- 
personated by Miss Mary Sully Haywood. Acting as foils for such scenes as these 
were the finely played parts of Old Ursula and Old Claus by Mrs. Litchford and 
Mr. King. Mr. James P. Brawley, as Jacobus, the Burgomaster, and Mr. Edward 
H. Markison, as Kurf, the Syndic, these two being the mouthpiece of these simple 
village folk, were well cast for their respective parts. 

The little children, sparkling and dancing, lent a fairy note of enchantment. 
The light and shade of the play, the gay market scene, the heartaching sadness, 
the haunting undertone of the Piper's flute, all went to make up a fantasy of 
distinct atmosphere and one that will live long in the memory of the enthusiastic 
audience. 

Mrs. Ashe and the whole Raleigh chapter deserve, and have, the 
congratulations of the whole Alumnae body. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 141 



ALUMNAE NOTES 



Mrs. Beatrice Holmes Alston, of Tryon, N". C, has been the guest 
)i Miss Dowd at her home in West Raleigh, and has also spent a night 
r two at St. Mary's. 

The following notice from the News cmd Observer is of interest to 
ur readers, as Miss Price was a student at St. Mary's a few years ago: 

Raleigh had a prominent place in a notable event in Washington, D. C, on 
tonday, when Dr. Friedrich Franz Friedmann gave his anti-tuberculosis treat- 
lent to a number of children. This was in George Washington University Hos- 
iltal where, amid the tears and cheers of many people, Dr. Friedmann used his 
turtle serum" in treating sufferers from the white plague. 

Raleigh was represented at the clinic by Miss Isabelle W. Price, daughter of 
lirs. Nellie W. Price, of this city, who in June will graduate as a trained nurse 
ft the George Washington University Hospital. Dr. Friedmann had a number 
E assistants and Miss Price was one of the three nurses taking part. The Wash- 
ington Times had a four-column illustration of the scene, with Miss Price a 
{■rominent figure in it. 

ALUMNAE WEDDINGS 



Bridge rs— Strange 

The Right Reverend and Mrs. Robert Strange 

request the honor of your 

presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Helen 

to 

Mr. Burke Haywood Bridgers 

on the evening of Thursday, the tenth of April 

at half after six o'clock 

at Saint James Church 

Wilmington, North Carolina 



Patterson— Simmons 

Mr. and Mrs. Furnifold McLendell Simmons 

request the honor of your 

presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Isabel 

to 

Dr. Joseph F. Patterson 

on the afternoon of Wednesday, the sixteenth of April 

at five o'clock 

at Christ Episcopal Church 

New Bern, North Carolina 



142 The St. Maby's Muse. 

Evins— Cooper 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry George Cooper 

request the honor of your 

presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Mary 

to 

Mr. Thomas Moore Evins 

on the evening of "Wednesday, the sixteenth of April 

at eight o'clock 

at St. Stephen's Church 

Oxford, North Carolina 



Beard— McGehee 

Mr. and Mrs. George Badger McGehee 

request the honor of your 

presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Mary Polk 

to 

Mr. John Grover Beard 

on Tuesday evening, April the twenty-second 

nineteen hundred and thirteen 

at eight o'clock 

Chapel of the Cross 

Chapel Hill, North Carolina 



Peck.— Davis 

Mr. and Mrs. Junius Davis 

request the honor of your 

presence at the marriage of their daughter 

Alice 

to 

Mr. William Murdoch Peck 

on the afternoon of Tuesday, the twenty-ninth of April 

nineteen hundred and thirteen 

at half after five o'clock 

Saint James Church 

"Wilmington, North Carolina 



41 



READ !— M ARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
iders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
nciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
dr loss, not ours. 



eigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 
Ready-to- Wear Garments 
Ten per cent off to College Girls. 



3)e Jf astfjton 



Fayetteville 
Street 



French 
Hat Shop 



Exclusive 
Millinery 



Last night as sister's beau was going home 
And they were standing in the dark front hall, 

I heard him say, "Sweetheart, I'll just steal one." 
And 'bout that time I heard nurse Ellen call. 



This morn I went to the umbrella jar, 
Full of curiosity as I could hold, 

But not a single one of them was gone. 

I'd love to know what sister's fellow "stold." 



—Ex. 



IE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF AI.I, KINDS 
MILLINERY 



lored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

DIES' TINE SHOES AMD SLIPPERS 



" It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 

Established 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY g| 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 



WE SELL, GOSSARD'S LACE 
FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



SOI 



„ 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA TOTS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



He took her for an ice cream treat, 

His pretty blue-eyed Sal; 
But fainted when he saw the sign, 
"Cream, ninety cents a gal." 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

The 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO? 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladiea' Fine Shoes. 



Advertisements. 



ollege GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

e OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

f 174 
Both Phones :< oofi 



LLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Special 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 

'»t Suits, School Dresses, Evening- Costumes, "Waists, Coats, and Accessory Lines 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trimmings, Gloves, Hosiery, Laces, Notions, Etc. 



cKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. 



Fayetteville St. 



C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds oi Keys Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 



"I thought I knew I knew it all, 

But now I must confess 
The more I know I know I know, 



I know I know the less." — Ex. 

; 

1 
j 


(KING'S GROCERY 
" The Little Store " 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 


yJUES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
( Eire Insurance and Investments 

• CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 




HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

1 




Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 



Advertisements. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 
AND SODA FOUNTAIN 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streei 


ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Presoriptionist 


Good Things Always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 

124 Fayetteville Street 


ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capita 
Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 

President. Treasurer. 
G. H. DORTCH, R. S. BUSBEE, 

Secretary. General Manager. 


Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 
Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
118 E.Davie Street Raleigh N. C. 


HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. < 


Little slips of paper, 

In a skillful hand, 
Make a task seem easy 

And the mark be grand. — Ex. j 



. ROSENTHAL 
HO. 

GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATION 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engrave 

Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 
iFloral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 
Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 



T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 
f\\ Picture Frames and Window Shades 

PERRY'S ART STORE 
S. Wilming-ton Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVING BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Calendar, March-April 



[March 27- 
IMarch 28- 
April 5— 
April 8- 
ii April 9- 
April 14— 
April 17- 
April 19- 
■ April 21- 
April 22- 
April 23- 
April 26- 
April 26- 
April 28- 



-"The Piper," presented by St. Mary's Alumnae at opera house. 

-Concert by Bonci. 

•Junior party to Seniors. 

•Mr. Stone's party to Seniors. 

Mr. South's vocal recital. 

■Sarah Fenner's piano recital. 

-Fritzi Scheff in "The Love Wager." 

■Lawn party, given by Muse Club. 

•Lina Lockhart's piano recital. 

-Raleigh Music Festival. 

■Raleigh Music Festival. 

■State Track Meet. 

-Folk Lore entertainment by Physical Culture Class. 

■Leone Herbert's piano recital. 



Ii MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
Ml Our Work Done by The Goodyear Welt System 
104 E. Harg-ett Street 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 
Cardwell & O' Kelly, Proprietors 

204 S. Salisbury Street 



THE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A, & M. 
' Athletic Association. $1.60 per year. Walter 
' C. Taylor, Bus. Mgr., West Raleigh, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 



TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishings 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 

Personal attention to mail orders. Bell Phone 438 



BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST DRY GOOD STORE 

Come and See Us in Our New Home 

Everything: fo "Woman's Wear. Ready-to-Wear Garments of all Kinds 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
The Wake Drug- Store. Phones 228 


ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 




HICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE Phones 107 
Prompt Delivery 


WEATHERS ART STORE 

Art Store, Art Materials and Art Novelties 

117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 




Jolly £r Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C- 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings anc 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser 
vice and value. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 


J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 
222 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Haegett St. 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 COR. SALISBURY AND HARGETT ST: 


BRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

MUSIC HOUSE 


WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
115 S. Harrington Street Phone 941 M 


Perhaps some jokes are old, 

And should be on the shelf; 
But if you know some better ones, 

Send in a few yourself. — Ex. 


Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 


New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

NORFOLK newb e erS 

HUIII ULI\ QOLDSBORO 

Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 


Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 


W. W. CROXTON, 

Traffic Manager, NORFOLK, VA. 


C. W. UPCHURCH, 

General Agrent, RALEIGH, N. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

71st ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 19, 1912. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 1913. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ & THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these < S - THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: ) ^ THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector 



TEfje 



g>t jllarp's; jWuse 



iWap, 1913 




* 



Ealeigl), JEt. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

PRE-COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



ol. XVir May, 1913. JSTo. 8 



Commencement Program, 1913 



\tubday, May 24: 

8 : 15 p. m. — Annual Elocution Recital in the Auditorium. "The Merchant 
of Venice." 

ctnday, May 25: 

11 : 00 a. m. — Commencement Sermon in the Chapel, by Rev. C. Ernest 
Smith, D.D., D.C.L., Rector of St. Thomas' Church, 
Washington, D. C. 
3:00 p.m. — Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 

onday, May 26: 

11 : 00 a.m. — Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 
3 : 00 p. m. — Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the Studio. 
4:30 p. m. — Annual Alumna? Meeting in the Art Studio. 
8 : 30 p. m. — Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 
9:30 p.m. — Rector's Reception in the School Parlor. 



uesday, May 27: 

11:00 a.m. — Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium, Annual Address by 
Rev. C. B. Wilmer, D.D., Rector of St. Luke's Church, 
Atlanta, Ga. Closing Exercises in the Chapel. 



144 The St. Maey's Muse. 



LITERARY DEPARTMENT 



MARY BROWN BUTLER and JULIA WASHINGTON ALLEN, Editors 



A Picture 



"Chaw Sib." 



A sunny day, a flowery porch 

With roses nearly covered; 

A little cot, a well-kept lot 

With bright things almost smothered; 

A woman, lithe and sweet and blithe, 

With skin of cream and roses, 

The fairest thing on earth to two 

Stood there among the posies. 

Beside her stood upon a chair 

A fair-haired little daughter 

And both washed windows, clear and fair, 

'Mid rippling, gurgling laughter. 

Behind them stood the other one, 

Uncouth and rough, may be, 

But such a look was in his face 

That made it good to see. 

"I wass 'em bight and pitty, Dad, 

"Dess like my Mamma do, 

"I wub and wub em dus as hard, 

'And in de torner, too." 



Sunset on the Green Mountains 



Pbancesca King. 

A person wishing to see a glorious sight has only to sit on a small hil 
hack of Bridgewater, Vermont, which faces the west, and watch the sui 
sink behind Mt. Killington, one of the highest of the Green Mountains 

At about six o'clock on a summer afternoon the sun begins to set. A 
that hour the big blue mountains stand out, clear and bold, agains 
the golden horizon. A person sitting at a distance of the aforemen 
tioned hill can distinguish the trees on the mountains' sides. As tin 
sun gradually sinks lower and lower, the mountains become less distinc. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 145 



ind a little pink veil shrouds the peaks. This pink veil slowly enlarges 
tself until the whole range of mountains is enveloped in a mysterious 
nist. When the sun is directly behind Killington, the sharp pointed 
>eak of that mountain is adorned with a golden crown, making Killing- 
on king of the Green Mountains. Little pink and lavender clouds 
>lay about the horizon and occasionally one of them crosses over the sun, 
ausing the mountains to be shrouded in the deep purple for a short 
nterval. At last the sun is lost to view. But the peaks of the moun- 
ains are still capped with a golden mist while darkness gradually be- 
gins to creep up from their bases. By degrees their golden crowns 
iegin to disappear and the mountains first become a dark, deep blue then 
;radually they take on their black cloaks of night. One stands spell- 
»ound under the majestic scene for some minutes. Night has come — 
he light of day is at rest. 



The Mission of Dorothea Lynde Dix 

(History Essay.) 



Susannah Stelle Busbee. 



To all of us the name of Dorothea Lynde Dix is more or less familiar, 
rat were we to be asked, "What do you know of her?" the majority, I 
ear, could only answer vaguely that she worked for the betterment of 
he insane and that the asylum in this State bears the name "Dix Hill." 
t is strange that the story of the life of this remarkable woman and the 
aagnitude of her works, not only in this country but abroad, is so coin- 
►aratively unknown. No doubt it is due to the fact that she was ex- 
remely reticent in regard to all matters pertaining to herself or her 
rork, and during her lifetime never consented to permit anything to be 

^'Tritten about her. Her life was devoted to the relief of human misery; 

liJ ;:Ot to the gaining of widespread fame and commendation. 

Let us briefly glimpse at the early life of Miss Dix, until the time 

liE 7hen her special mission in life was revealed to her, and she entered 
pon her career of weary labors and achievements, never surpassed by 
bat of any other philanthropist. A childhood, so dismal and unhappy 

'^ bat the memory of it was always a painful one to her, caused her to 



146 The St. Maky's Muse. 

run away from her home in Worcester, Massachusetts, early in life, anc 
put herself under the care of her Puritanical grandmother in Boston 
where she secured shelter and education, but where her sensitive nature 
suffered keenly from lack of the tenderness her childish heart longed for 
"I never knew childhood" Miss Dix would passionately exclaim in latei 
years'. 

During this time, she fitted herself to become a teacher ; and whet 
only nineteen, began her period of school teaching, enlarging her schoo 
from time to time and assuming more work and responsibility than hei 
frail strength permitted. However, her indomitable will spurred he 
on to continue this work for fifteen years, at the end of which time 
completely exhausted, she suffered an utter state of collapse. Afte 
eighteen months of illness, spent in England, she returned home, 
feeble invalid, lonely and unhappy. 

It was now that Miss Dix, consenting to give Sunday School instruc 
tion in the East Cambridge (Massachusetts) jail, was brought face t< 
face for the first time with the conditions prevailing in the jails an^ 
almshouses of Massachusetts. In this jail, where a few insane peopl 
were confined also, she was brought into contact with the overcrowding 
the herding together of innocent, guilty, and insane persons, and wit 
the numerous other evils too horrible to be described that existed a. 
over the country at that time. Now it was that her special work was re 
vealed to her — it seemed to her a clear call from God to dedicate he 
life to the help of the poor outcast insane. With that faith, which wa 
the greatest and most steadfast force in her nature, she consecrated hei 
self, as it were, at this time to the relief of misery. 

The first thought that occurred to her systematic mind was just ho\ 
widespread the horrible conditions were ; and, notebook in hand, sh 
visited every jail and almshouse in Massachusetts. A woman alway 
with a keen sense of justice and intolerant of wrong in any form, w 
can imagine the lasting effect this "descent into inferno" had upon hei 
as she went around, gathering the vast amount of information wit] 
which she prepared her first memorial, addressed to the legislature o 
Massachusetts. This piteous cry for help for insane persons "confine 
in cages, closets, cellars, stalls, pens ; chained, naked, beaten with rod; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 147 


'and lashed into obedience" produced a tremendous sensation, and with 
ralie passage of the bill providing for immediate relief was won Miss 
i Dix's first legislative victory. 

j 1 Through her investigations in this State, she had realized that all 
pver the Union the state of the pauper insane was practically the same, 
md it was now that she deliberately planned to continue her campaign 
State by State. The account of her lonely trips to every State in the 
'Union east of the Rocky Mountains, in many of which she established 
State lunatic asylums, would fill volumes. Each memorial brought be- 
fore the various legislatures had to be a separate and distinct piece of 
work with its own "local color." The success of these appeals was 
largely due to Miss Dix's unequaled powers of portraying or describing, 
>f expressing herself clearly, positively and forcefully. Unusually suc- 
cessful as a lobbyist, she had the power of winning over to her side the 
1 eaders in a legislature, and securing their ardent support-. 

In the fall of 1848 we find her at work in Raleigh. The outlook was 

Lot at all encouraging, for the Democratic party had joined together to 

Appose anything involving expense, even so much as the lighting the 

samps in the portico of the State Capitol ; but in her usual manner she 

pent ten weeks of fatiguing labor canvassing the State, and accumu- 

ating the vast amount of eye-witness testimony with which she wrote 

ier appeal. To a friend she now wrote : "They say 'Nothing can be 

KJjHone here !' I reply, 'I know no such word in the vocabulary I adopt.' 

* * I thought I could not have canvassed the State for nothing. 

i)0 the result proved." The memorial was presented to the General 

assembly and the bill providing for the building of an asylum passed 

rith a great majority. "I leave North Carolina compensated a thousand 

f bid for all labors by this great success," she now wrote. To the elo- 

af uent plea of Hon. James C. Dobbin, of Fayetteville, goes the credit of 

yelping her to attain this end. The Raleigh Insane Asylum remains 

lifs a lasting reminder of this "Angel of Mercy," who knew not the 

leaning of the word failure. 
; o:o Lack of space causes me to refer only briefly to her further success in 
seeping before her the legislatures of twenty great states, in carry- 
ig by storm the Senate and House of Representatives in Washing- 



148 The St. Mahy's Muse. 

ton again and again, and in Europe, in winning a like triumph ir 
the British Parliament, and in revolutionizing the lunacy legislatior 
in Scotland ; and should we omit her memorable interview with Piui 
IX, which had most beneficent results ? To read of these accom 
plishments makes us realize how truly it was said of her that hat 
she lived in the early ages of the world, her works of mercy would hav< 
led to her actual canonization. Let us conclude with a few words 
of this marvelous woman, called "the most useful and distinguishec 
woman America has yet produced," which give us a deeper insigh 
into the beauty of her soul : 

"Let me then take diligent heed to my ways ; let me make my hear 
clean from its offenses ; let me watch that my lamp burn brightly, an 
may my light be not hidden, but like the flame that glowed on the ai 
cient altars, may it never be extinguished ; having its origin in heaver 
may it guide me there." 

A May Sketch 

Caroline Clarke Jones. 



The grove is silent and the tall trees seem to be waiting for son 
one to come and wake them. They do not wait in vain, for a bell 
ringing and out of all the buildings come pouring many girls. No: 
the trees are awake, and with the rustling of their leaves they call 
the girls to come and sit beneath their shade. 

"Oh, Margaret, please bring me my sewing when you come out as 
have to write now." 

"Oh, all right Mary, I have to go to gym. first, but then we can se 
until time to dress for dinner." 

Many girls drift into the grove and settle down to finish embroide 
ing the things they are making for their friends who are to gradua 
in a few weeks. Soon a crowd gathers on the benches under an o 
oak and at once some one suggests singing. And as their needles f 
they sing; "In the Evening by the Moonlight," or "Mobile Bay" ai 
many others ; but they come back again to these first two because Sar; 
and Julia can sing such good tenor. 

"Oh, I can sing fine tenor to 'O You Beautiful Doll,' and so Cath 



H 



The St. Mary's Muse. 149 

ine starts the tune and the rest take it up until toward the end Sarah 
comes in with her tenor. 

"Oh, girls, let me tell you something grand," cries Elizabeth as she 
rushes breathlessly up to the group, "Brother is here and he is coming 
out to see me." 

"Please give him our best, oh ! somebody please go and see who has 
any express. I see the wagon coming into the grove." 

"I have finished my scalloping," says Bessie, "and so I'll go and if 
knj of you get boxes or candy, I'll take them off and eat them all by 
nyself." 

"Oh, that's agreeable to us if you will only go and see if we've got 
any." 

And off she goes toward East Rock. 

"Oh, Julia," she yells from the door after a minute, "you have 
;ome candy, and please come and get it." 

And Julia runs — no she flies, to the office and emerges a few minutes 
ater with a big box of candy. 

"Oh, hurry, don't walk so. slow, Julia, for we are about to die for 
ome wicts.' " 
Then comes quiet for awhile as the girls eat and sew. 
The big bell is ringing and some of the girls reluctantly rise and tread 
heir weary way to detention and after they have gone the rest settle 
iown to really sew, but soon the crowd starts thinning, for some must 
i;o and dress and write before dinner. Now the five-thirty bell rings 
!nd the last reluctant one leaves to dress for dinner. 

The old trees do not have time to go to sleep again as in a few min- 
ites girls start coming out from all of the buildings in white and light 
olors and they stroll slowly around the grove. Some go into East 
?ock to see if the afternoon mail is up. And others, as they walk 
re looking at the glorious sunset. Some one starts singing: 
" The sun is sinking fast 
The daylight dies." 

$ But now the dinner bell rings and the girls go toward Clement 

lall. 

Again the trees are still and a gentle breeze stirs the leaves and 
jigain all is quiet and the old trees that have watched over young girls 

Dr almost a century stand quiet as sentinels. 



150 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



ELIZABETH ANDERSON TARRY and ELLEN ARMISTEAD JOHNSON, Editors 



April 28— Piano Recital by Leone Herbert 

Leone Herbert's recital on the 28th was greatly enjoyed by all of 
us as was also Arlene Joyner's singing which added greatly to the 
beauty of the program. To quote from the News and Observer: 

The piano recital given by Miss Leone Herbert last evening in St. Mary's 
Auditorium was a complete success, as Miss Herbert is a pianist of ability and 
taste. Her technique is easy and brilliant and her interpretations musical and 
true. The opening number, "My Heart Ever Faithful," by Bach-Lavignac, and 
Mozart Rondo in D, was given with appreciation of the contrast in style and 
technique. The "Norwegian Group" was especially effective, and the Dubois 
"Scherzo and Chorale" showed delicacy and power. Miss Herbert was assistec 
by Miss Arlene Joyner, whose voice is a clear lyric soprano with a promise o; 
much versatility. She gave the Aria from "Herodiade" with dramatic abilitj 
and finish unusual in so young a singer. Her group of modern songs, "M3 
Star," by Spross, "My Desire," by Nevin, and "Ecstasy," by Rummel, showec 
the wide range and the flexibility of the fresh and beautiful voice and delighte< 
the audience. 

PROGRAM. 

1. (a) "My Heart Ever Faithful," Bach-Lavigna< 

(b) Rondo in D Mozar 

2. Palacco Brilliante Op. 2 Wetie 

3. Air de Salome from "Herodiade," Massene 

Miss Joyner. 

4. Nocturne in G. Op. 37, No. 2 Chopv 

5. Norwegian Group: 

(a) Scherzino Kijeru'i 

(b) Serenade Olse 

(c) Dance Caprice Orel 

6. (a) My Star Spros 

(b) My Desire Nevi, 

(c) Ecstacy Rumm( 

Miss Joyner. 

7. Scherzo and Chorale. Op. 18 Bubic 

May 1— Mr. Owen's Party 

On Thursday afternoon, May 1st, Mr. Owen delightfully entertainc 
in his studio his certificate pupils, Euth Douglas, Lina Lockhart, Susa 






The St. Mary's Muse. 151 

"Rawlings and Elizabeth Tarry. The room was beautifully decorated 
n flowers and lighted with candles. Gertrude Brigham and Amy Win- 
ston served delicious punch and refreshments. Later Mr. Owen sang 
md played a number of selections for us, among them several of his 
>wn composition. How we hated to hear the dinner bell ring after 
laving spent such a delightful afternoon. 

May 3— Inter-Society Debate 

On Saturday evening, May 3d, the annual debate between the Sigma 
Lambda, and the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Societies was held in the 
school auditorium. The subject for debate was, Resolved — That it is 
^undesirable that women should have the right of suffrage ; the Negative 
D^as upheld for Sigma Lambda by Mary Butler, of Henderson and 
Lanie Hales, of Wilson; the Affirmative for E. A. II. by Julia Cooper, 
)f Oxford, and Julia Allen, of Golclsboro. 

The four speeches were all excellent, being carefully prepared and 
'Well delivered, and the retorts were especially spirited. At the close 
)f the debate Alma Mater was sung while the written slips containing 
the decision of the judges were collected by one of the marshals, and 
;aken to Jennie Woodruff, president of Alpha Rho Literary Society, 
who was presiding. The judges, Judge Hoke, Dr. Sumney and Mr. 
Seigle, decided in favor of the affirmative. 

May 5— Ruth Douglas' Recital 

On Monday evening, May 5th, Ruth Douglas gave her certificate 
piano recital in the school auditorium. She played with perfect ease 
and composure. Her faultless technique showed itself strongly in the 
■ Rondo Capriccioso of Mendelssohn, but she was probably at her best 
( in the Sonata Tragica of MacDowell ; and through her playing and in- 
terpretation of it showed herself a true artist. 

Ruth was delightfully assisted by Frances Sears, soprano, who won 
the audience from the first with her true and flexible tones, and clear 
enunciation. The recital was one of the most enjoyable of the year, 
and will not be forgotten soon by those present. E. A. T. 

h 



152 The St. Mary's Muse. 



May 8— Susan Rowlings' Organ Recital 

Susan Rawlings' recital on Thursday evening, May 8th, was very 
successful and interesting. It was preceded by the usual evening i 
chapel service, at which quite a number of outside visitors were pres- 
ent. The following account appeared in next day's News and Observer: 

An interesting and highly creditable organ recital was given last evening, in 
St. Mary's Chapel by Miss Susan Porter Rawlings, assisted by Mr. Donald C. 
South, baritone. For so young a player Miss Rawlings handled her instrument 
well, showing taste as well as technique. She was at her best in the Tannhauser 
number, in the Saint Saens Rhapsodie on Breton melodies and in the Merkel 
"Sonata." Miss Rawlings was particularly happy in her accompaniments. Mr. 
South was sympathetic. He gave two selections, Recitative and aria from "Re- 
becca" and Shelley's "Art Thou Weary?" 

May 10— Sophomore Party to the School 

The whole school breathed a sigh of relief when the parlor doors were 
thrown open on Saturday night, May 10th, for we had been waiting 
anxiously to know what kind of party the "Soph-o-mores" would give, 
and had screwed our hopes up to the highest point. We were not 
at all disappointed when we entered the beautifully decorated room 
and were greeted with a "bran new" song. 

A very delightful program had been arranged and afterwards we 
could not tell what we had enjoyed most for everything — songs, recita- 
tions and speeches — were splendid. During the evening Helen Peoples 
the president of the Sophomore Class presented for the class a picture 
of Jackson to the school, and Mae London, for the Freshmen, a com- 
panion picture of Washington. The appreciation of the school was 
fully expressed by Miss Katie and the Rector, who thanked the classes 
for their gifts, which are to be hung, with the picture of Lee, given 
by the Freshmen last year, in the Study Hall. 

After delicious refreshments had been served, we parted agreeing 
that another verse should be added to the Sophomore song in which 
their ability to entertain most delightfully is fully explained. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



May 12— Elizabeth Tarry's Recital 

The artistic and delightful recital given by Elizabeth Tarry with 
jertrude Brigham assisting is adequately described in the News and 
Observer of the next day: 

In a recital given last evening in St. Mary's auditorium, Miss Elizabeth Ander- 
on Tarry, by her rendering of a difficult program, proved herself a pianist of 
echnique and taste. Miss Tarry's playing of the Mozart Sonata IX was unusual 
n a school performer — the technique was clean and delicate, and the interpre- 
ation keenly appreciative of the great master's tenderness and charm. 

The Schumann "Etudes Symphoniques" were given with breadth of tone and 
iteady German rhythm. The last number, a group of dances, (a) Dance Negre, 
;b) Dance Orientale, (c) Dance Bohemian, and (d) Valse, was modern in 
iharacter, and was given with dash and variety very attractive. 

Miss Tarry was charmingly assisted by Miss Gertrude Brigham, who has a 
yric soprano voice, sweet and flexible. Miss Brigham sang two numbers, 
uuchstone's "Delight" and an attractive group number, (a) Friml "Giannina 
Mia," (b) Wells "If I Were You," and R. Blinn Owen's "Waltz Song," which 
•eceived great applause. 

May 14— Domestic Science Dinner 

Wednesday, being the day for the last lesson of the Second Year 

Domestic Science Class, we decided to have a dinner to close the years' 

work with. Miss Lane and Miss Schenck both giving permission, 

we went to class early on the fourteenth of May and worked happily 

tall the afternnoon, permission having been given for us to "skip" 

j-dinner, we, with Miss Lane as our guest, spent a delightful evening 

fand left vowing that no Domestic Science Class ever had a more 

^enjoyable year. 

May 15— Children's Recital 

The Children's Recital, held Thursday afternoon in the auditorium, 

ewas a new form of music recital at St. Mary's, as it was the first time 

.that an entire music program has been given by the children. It 

was very successful, and we hope they will be continued. The pro- 

'gram was as follows: 

iThe Slumber Boat Gaynor 

Chorus: Primary and Preparatory Classes. 
Dancing in the Sunshine, 

Lucy Lay. 

Melody from Op. 218 Kohler 

Sallie Cameron. 



154 The St. aLary's Muse. 

First Robins Rogers 

Laura Thompson. 

Peasant's Dance Smith > 

Randolph Hill. 
Dancing Lesson, 

Ellex Lay. 
Doll's Dream, 

Annie Bowex. 

March, 4 Hands Gurlitt j 

Maby Hoke a.\d Lilias Shepherd. 

The First Violet Behr I 

Charlotte Johnson. 

Tarantella Dennee" i| 

Naxcy Lay. 

Phyllis Waltz Brown j 

Julia Jebman. 

Sonatina Eiihler j 

Katherixe Hughes. 

The Avalanche Heller ; 

Mary Barrow. 

Echoes of the Ball Gillet f 

Bessie Folk. 

The Dandelion Salter 

Agnes Tkiberlake. 

Gentle Maiden Gurlitt 

E. Bowex. 
Valse Denned 

I. BOWEX. 

March Impromptu, Duet, 

Susan and Marie Lixehax. 

Mazurka Glissando Bohm 

Irene Tyree. 

Chorus, Morn Rise; Dark Brown is the River Manney j 

Primary axd Preparatory Classes. 

May 17— Concert by the Chorus Class and Voice Pupils 

Mr. Owen's pupils, assisted by Miss Paulsen, violinist, gave a de- 
lightful concert on the evening of the 17th. with the following interest- 
ing program: 

PART I. 

1. Sketches from Italy Philipp Gretscher 

(a) Tarantella. 
Co) In Venice. 

(c) Carretta Siciliana. (A gaudily painted cart.) 

Chorus. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 155 

Wind in the Trees Goring Thomas 

Miss Ethel Swann. 

(a) Noon and Night Haioley 

jl (b) Long Ago MacDowell 

Miss Margaret Thomas. 

(a) Ave Maria Franz Abt 

Obligato by Miss Joyner. 

! (b) The "Walnut Tree Schumann 

Chorus. 

Elysium Oley Speaks 

Miss Lucy Dortch. 

! Friihlingslied Weil 

Miss Gertrude Brigham. 

) Aria from "Samson and Delilah," Saint-Saens 

Miss Arlexe Joyner. 

i (a) A Maid Sings Light MacDowell 

i (b) A Secret from Bacchus Huhn 

Mr. South. 

PART II. 

ante Marie Magdeleine Vincent d'lndy 

Solos by Miss Frances Sears. 
Chorus. 



SCHOOL GOSSIP 



LAURA MARGARET HOPPE and SUSIE McIVER, Editors 



i Bessie White, Bebecca Kyle, Julia Bond, Laura Clark, and Mary 
ichaux enjoyed visits from their fathers during the month. 

Amy Winston delightfully entertained the Senior Class with an 
Ltomobile ride. 

Elizabeth Tarry's mother and sister came up from Henderson for 
sr certificate recital. 

Misses Buth and Agnes Hairston, St. Mary's girls of the '80's, have- 
en visiting Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire. 



156 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Jane Kerr went home for a few days to be bridesmaid in a friend's 
wedding. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gold paid their daughter, Elizabeth, a short visit. 

Gladys Smith, of Wilson, JSL C, spent a few days with Lanie Hales 
on her way home from Fassifern. 

Katharine Bunn and Katharine Lassiter have had visits from their 
brothers. 

Mrs. Harris came up from Henderson in order to taken Helen, who 
has been sick, home. 

Leone Herbert's sister came up for her recital and spent a few days' 
with her. 

Janie Hunt, Mary Bryan Griswold, Melba McCullers, Fannie' 
Cooper, Evelyn Maxwell and Agnes Reese have had visits from their 
mothers. 

Lina Lockhart's brother-in-law spent a few hours in Raleigh while 
passing through. 

Amy Winston has been to Durham where she spent a few days with 
her sister. 

Mrs. H. G. Cooper and Mrs. T. M. Evins (Mary Cooper, '05-'06) I 
stayed several days in Raleigh with Sophronia and Julia. 

We were sorry to have Jennie Belle Boyden, Dorothy Hood, and! 
Lyde Palmer, leave school before the end of the year. 

Many of last year's girls are expected up for commencement this 
year. 

Margaret McGary spent several days with her friends in school. 

Nannie Shields, of Scotland ]STeck, spent a few days at St. Mary's 
in May. 

Miss Anna Barrow Clark, '05, sister of Laura Clark, was here for 2 
few days early in May. 

Elizabeth Leary, 1910-11, is visiting in Raleigh and has spe: 
several days at St. Mary's. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 157 

",We were all glad to have Maud Reynolds back after having been at 
ime on account of her health. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Emery Crafts 
announce the marriage of their daughter 
Blanche Llewella 
to 
Mr. Arthur Roy Kaiser 
on Monday, April the seventh 
nineteen hundred and thirteen 
Boston, Massachusetts. 
At Home 
after October fifteenth 
gina, Saskatchewan, Canada. 

iThe above announcement will be of interest to St. Mary's girls who 
ij3re here last year, as Miss Crafts taught violin at St. Mary's then. 
er announcement came a little late to get in the April number, so it 
►pears now, somewhat belated. 



The Ladies 



(With apologies to Rudyard Kipling. March 28, 1913, Warrenton, Virginia.) 

I've taken my fun where I've found it; 

I've rogued an' I've ranged in my time, 

I've 'ad my pickin' o' mashes, 

An' four o' the lot was prime. 

One was a girl in my 'ome town, 

One was a girl I met at school, 

One was from Baltimore City, 

And the other — I think broke my rule. 

Now I are'nt no 'and with the mashes, 

For, takin' 'em all along, 

You never can say till you've tried 'em 

An' then you are like to be wrong. 

There's times when you'll think that you might'nt — 

There's times when you'll think that you may, 

But the things you'll learn from the old and the young, 

They'll 'elp you a lot some day. 



158 The St. Mary's Muse. 

I was a young un in Carolina, 
Shy like a girl to begin 
J — Y — M — she made me 
An' J — was as clever as sin. 
Older than me, but my first un 
More like a mother she were, 
Showed me the way to study and play 
An' I learned about women from 'er. 

Then I was sent off to college, 

In charge of an older girl 

And I got me a mash from the sophomore trash, 

'Twas her eyes I think and a curl. 

Funny and graceful and pretty, 

But cold as ice she were, 

But she treated me square — as a "soph" could dare, 

An' I learned about women from 'er. 

Then they shifted me up to Virginia 

(Or I might ha' been loving her yet) 

An' I took with a girl from the City, 

The cousin of a friend called Bet — 

Taught me the ways of tennis, 

Kind of a "star" she were, 

But she threw me one night — cause I laughed at her height 

An' I learned about women from 'er. 

Then here at 'ome last winter 

I found a kid of 'er teens, 

Girl from a place in Long Island, 

The straightest I ever 'ave seen, 

Love at first sight was my trouble 

She did'nt know what it were, 

And I would'nt do a wrong, cause I liked 'er too strong, 

But I learned about women from 'er. 

I've taken my fun where I've found it, 

And now I must pay for my fun 

For the more you are known o' the others, 

The less will you settle to one, 

And the end of its sittin' and thinkin', 

And dreamin' Hell-fires to see — 

So be warned by my lot, which I know you will not, 

An' learn about women from me. 



M. Louise Evans. 



"Written for The MrsE, St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year ■'-■••■ One Dollar. 

Single Copies s = = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
he Interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1912-1913. 

Caroline Clarke Jones, Editor-in-Chief. 

Julia Washington Allen, Mart Brown Butler, Laura Margaret Hoppe, 

Ellen Armistead Johnson, Susie McIver, Elibe Gordon Stiles, 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry, Amy Conyers Winston. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff, Business Manager. 

Myrtle Warren, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



So commencement is upon us at last. Commencement with its many 
pleasures, joys and sorrows. For now comes the time for partings, and 
pough we are joyous still the sadness of parting from those friends 
that we love so dear, is sad. But all commencements are fine — none 
are failures — and let us put forward all of our enthusiasm and make 
this the very best commencement yet. To Preps., Freshmen, Sophs., 
Juniors and Seniors and faculty alike, may it be a commencement of 
the many joys and festivities of a happy summer vacation. 



Merci ! 

The Editors of the Muse, with this their last number, wish to thank 
you, one and all, for your help that you have given us through the year. 
We have appreciated more than we can say all of the interest you have 
taken in the Muse, and hope that you will, one and all, continue to take 
a great, great, interest in the Muse always. 






ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Eenest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

( Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger, Raleigh. 

(.Mrs. Bessie Smedes Leak, West Durham 
President - - Mrs. Frank Wood, Edenton. 

Vice-President - 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 
Treasurer - Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 

Fieu> Secretaries - - {^^Ire^o^SiS^ 011 ' 8816111 - 

The Alumnae Luncheon 

In May, 1910, the first time that there was seating capacity in tk 
school dining room, the Annual luncheons, given by the school Oi 
Alumnas Day to the Raleigh Chapter of the Alumnse Association 
were begun. That first luncheon was peculiarly successful, the guest* 
being seated in the new and beautiful Clement Hall, where, with aJ 
the school as guests as well as the visitors, there was still ample roon' 
The three succeeding luncheons have been equally enjoyable and sud 
cessful. The one this year was held on May 12, with a goodly numbe 
of Raleigh Alumnse present. At the close of a dainty and well-serve' 
luncheon, Mr. Lay spoke a few words of welcome to the guests and a|~ 
toastmaster introduced the speakers. These were Mrs. Knox, wL| 
spoke on behalf of Mrs. Ashe, chairman of the Raleigh Chapter J 
Miss Meg Hill Davis, and Miss Ellen Dortch, all of whom spoke briefl ei 
and on topics of interest to the Alumnae. They were followed by Mi- il 
Caroline Jones, President of the present Senior Class, who welcome 1 
the visitors on the part of the student body. After Mr. Lay's response 1 
all rose and sang Alma Mater, which brought to a close a very happ I 
occasion. 



The Raleigh Chapter 

The Raleigh Chapter's second semi-annual meeting is always hek 
in the school parlor at the close of the Alumnse Luncheon. The ons 



The St. Maky's Muse. 161 



lis year was important and interesting. After the Treasurer's report, 
irhich showed $76.50 already paid into the general fund, $250 proceeds 
rom "The Piper," ready to be paid in, it was voted that all funds then 
n the treasury, should be turned over to the General Alumnae Associa- 
tion, making the total from the Raleigh Chapter for this year, $400. 
.'his is a splendid showing and this Chapter deserves thanks and con- 
gratulations from the whole Alumna? body. 

Miss Ellen Dortch was chosen chairman, and Miss Susan Marshall 
ecretary for the coming year. Miss Lee was reelected as treasurer. 



The Annual Meeting 

The annual meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnae Association will be 
leld at St, Mary's May 26. It has been urged that as many Chapters 

pis possible send delegates to this meeting. Responses to letters sent 
>ut to the different Chapters are now coming in, and the prospects for 
i good meeting seem encouraging. These delegates are to be guests of 

^members of the Raleigh Chapter, as owing to the full school this year, 

chey cannot be entertained at St. Mary's. 

« 



ALUMNAE NOTES 



The Raleigh Chapter is planning a garden party to be given on the 
Jawn at St. Mary's, May 26, in honor of the visiting Alumnae. 

i Miss Anna Buxton, Field Secretary of the Alumnae, Western Dis- 
trict, is visiting at St. Mary's. 



READ !— M ARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and til 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a go( 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays the 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it I 
their loss, not ours. 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Ready- to- Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls. 



W&t Jf astfiton 



Fayetteville 
Street 



French 
Hat Shop 



Exclusive 
Millinery 



Annie, aged seven, at her Mother's knee, Said "Please Mother, oh please to 
me: Do doggies perch in dogwood trees? Do mock turtles talk in mockery 
Do mockoranges grow on mockorange trees? Do mockingbirds sing in mot 
ery? And what on earth can moccasins be? Is mock heroic a hero bold? Whc 
has a mock sun to do with the sun so old? Can you mock an awful moccasi 
snake? And can a mocker mockingly take, The hollow mockery and fill it u 
With mock turtle soup out of a cup?" The wise mother to Annie repliec 
"Your questions, child, can't be satisfied, For to do so would make a mock ov 
of me, And this I greatly refuse to be." 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 



Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES «ffi SLIPPERS 



' It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 



Established 1858 



1 MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



ALEIGH. 



NORTH CAROLINA 



CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 

COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

WE SELL, GOSSARD'S LACE 

FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOTS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



Why Is 

irantley's Fountain 

The 
MOST POPULAR? 

! 

Ask the Girls 



J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Advertisements. 



College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPAM 

Electric Light 
and Power 

Both Phones:-^ 2 ofi 



COLLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Speci 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 

Coat Suits, School Dresses, Evening- Costumes, Waists, Coats, and Accessory Din 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trimming's, Gloves, Hosiery, Daces. Notions, Etc. 



McKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. 



Fayetteville S 



C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 



T. F. BROCKWELL 
All Kinds ol Keys Bicycle Suppl 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 












KING'S GROCERY 
"The Little Store" 


YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 




HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 








GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 








CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 




RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


CaU PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 
3 


1 



Advertisements. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



BERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Presoriptionist 



3D Things Always at 



BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 



124 Fayetteville Street 



ness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

Wry S. Cabvee, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
I E. Davie Street Raleigh N. C. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 



G. H. DORTCH, 

Secretary. 



R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



1. ROSENTHAL 
5 GO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON <fe HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. O Phone 113 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th ai 
10th Ste., Washington, D. C, is now showing t! 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverwai 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and import* 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable n 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and repari' 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades 

PERRY'S ART STORE 
S. Wilmington Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicit 

THE MECHANICS SAVING BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Calender, May 



April 28 — Leone Herbert's piano recital. 

May 3 — Intersociety Debate. 

May 5 — Ruth Douglas' piano recital. 

May 8 — Susan Rawlings' organ recital. 

May 10 — Sophomore party to the School, in honor of the Seniors. 

May 12 — Alumnae Luncheon. 

May 12 — Elizabeth Tarry's piano recital. 

May 15 — Children's recital. 

May 17 — Chorus recital. 

May 19 — Final examinations begin. 

May 24 — Elocution recital, "Merchant of Venice." 

May 25 — Commencement sermon. 

May 26 — Class Day. Art Exhibit. Concert. Reception. 

May 27 — Commencement Day. 



I 



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Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Marts School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

71st ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 19, 1912. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 1913. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ ®- THE MUSIC SCHOOL, 

offers instruction in these ( $• THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: j £ THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education xoithout slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



Vacation dumber 



June, 1913 







38lalctsJj, Jfc. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse 

VACATION NUMBER 



>l. XVIT. June, 1913. No. 9 



The Seventy-First Commencement 



Jerusalem! high tower thy glorious walls, 

Would God I were in thee! 
Desire of thee my longing heart enthralls, 

Desire at home to be; 
Wide from the world outleaping, 

O'er hill and vale and plain, 
My soul's strong wing is sweeping, 

Thy portals to attain. 

gladsome day, and yet more gladsome hour! 

When shall that hour have come, 
When my rejoicing soul its own free power 

May use in going home? 
Itself to Jesus giving, 

In trust to His own hand, 
To dwell among the living 

In that blest Fatherland. 

What throng is this, what noble troop that pours, 

Arrayed in beauteous guise, 
Out through the glorious city's open doors, 

To greet my wondering eyes? 
The hosts of Christ's elected, 

The jewels that He bears 
In His own crown selected 

To wipe away my tears. 

Unnumber'd choirs before the Lamb's high throne 

There shout the jubilee, 
With loud resounding peal and sweetest tone, 

In blissful ecstacy: 
A hundred thousand voices 

Take up the wondrous song; 
Eternity rejoices 
God's praises to prolong. 



166 The St. Maey's Muse. 



' 



i„c 



L 



■ 



The Commencement Season 

The seventy-first commencement of St. Mary's extended from Sat 
day evening, May, 24th, through Tuesday morning, May 27th, bei 
the second year of the shortened commencement season, in which gr 
uation day has been changed from Thursday to Tuesday. The chai 
seems in every way successful. 

This commencement marked the close of the most successful year 
the history of the School, and the season was a peculiarly happy oi 
More visitors than usual were present and the closing festivities seem 
to be hearily enjoyed by them as well as by the members of the Scho 
The storm of Tuesday morning, which came just at the close of t, 
exercises in the Auditorium, was the only unpleasant feature, and in 
hour or two even that was forgotten. 

On Saturday evening the Dramatic Club, under the able direction 
Miss Davis, presented "The Merchant of Venice" as the annual recil 
of the Elocution Department, an excellent performance for so ambitio 
an effort. 

Sunday morning the Commencement Sermon was preached in t. 
Chapel by the Eev. C. Ernest Smith, D.D., D.C.L., of Washington, 
C. The sermon was full of eloquence and power, and yet so practic 
and appealing that it was well within the reach of all. The simp 
evening service in the afternoon was especially intended for the alui 
nse, and a large number of them were present. Dr. Smith spoke brief 
at this service also. 

The Class Day exercises Monday in the Grove were original ar 
artistic and were favored by perfect weather. 

At four o'clock Monday afternoon, in the Parlor, the annual alumn 
meeting was held. Those present considered it the most successful an 
the most largely attended meeting ever held by the alumnse. Delegat< 
from seven other chapters beside Raleigh were present. Miss Ami 
Buxton, of Winston-Salem, was elected President, and Mrs. F. H. Bu:l 
bee, of Raleigh, Vice-President of the association for the coming yea: 

The Annual Art Exhibit was held in the Studio Monday afternoo 
from four to six, and again after the concert in the evening. It was u 
to the usual high standard and gave much pleasure to all who ai 
tended it. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 167 



At six o'clock the Raleigh Chapter of the alumnse gave a garden party 
the Senior Class and the visiting alumnse in the Grove near Ravens- 
ift. This was a novel feature of the Commencement week and was 

, fit delightfully carried out. 

Monday's festivities were brought to a close by the Annual Concert 
the Music Department, always a particularly pleasant feature of the 
nmencement, and the Rector's Reception, which immediately followed 
i concert, and were greatly enjoyed. 
Tuesday morning the final exercises were completed, mared some- 

1 tat by the violent storm, but in spirit as vivid and impressive as al- 
ys. In the Auditorium were given the Salutatory, the Essay, both 
iei but effective; the Valedictory, full of real thought and feeling; 
3 brilliant address of Dr. Wilmer, and the usual announcement of 
omotions, honors and awards ; and then the concluding service was 
Id in the Chapel, where diplomas were delivered to the thirteen grad- 
tes, followed by the benediction, and the Recessional, the glorious 
erusalem, High Tower." The seventy-first commencement had 
ssed to live among happy memories. 

The Beginning of Commencement 

(From the News and Observer.) 
ll 
The sermon of Rev. Dr. C. Ernest Smith at St. Mary's School Sunday morning 

ened the commencement period. 

-The Washington rector was heard by more people than the Chapel would hold. 
: i preached a beautiful sermon from the text: "Eye hath not seen, nor ear 
sard, neither have entered into the heart of man, the things which God hath 

epared for them that love Him." 

In the chancel with him, Rev. George W. Lay and Bishop Joseph B. Cheshire 
I sisted in the services, and before him a choir of remarkable singers sang the 
(turch music. 

It will not be contended that a handsomer set of young women can be found in 
i e country than those who attend St. Mary's. They must have brought back 
he memory of that type which gave such glory to the Confederacy. They are 
l^nderful singers, and with that stirring music for which the Episcopalians are 

ited, they charmed the hundreds who do not attend the services there or the 

5 . 

piscopal Church elsewhere. 

1 Doctor Smith began his sermon by declaring that the text is one grossly per- 
i Tted by the pew and often by the pulpit. The text, he said, means no such 
, ing as the misunderstanding reader makes it mean. He thought it a perfectly 

itural thing for the Oriental mind to describe the glories of the other world in 



168 The St. Maey's Muse. 



the terms of his understanding, but they were not the meaning of the writer 
the sacred canon. 

THE TRIPLE LIFE. 

"Men have a triple life," the preacher said, "and it is like so many comp; 
ments. There is a mental, physical, and a spiritual life. It is possible fo 
man to occupy one, two, three or none of these compartments. It is possible 
occupy one and shut out the other two, or two and shut out the third. 

"And that is too often what is going en in our colleges," he said. "I went t 
school some time ago, and in the college paper that told of the college life, as 
said, there were columns and columns of the athletic life but not a word of 
spiritual life and not ten lines of the intellectual life of that community, 
that college life has come to mean athletic life to that institution. 

"Now it is very necessary, this athletic life, but it is possible for it to obsci 
entirely the other life." 

Dr. Smith told the story of the boy who had a cataract removed from his e 
and saw the beautiful world. He asked his parents why they had not told h 
of this world's glories. They replied that they could not have done so and tl 
he would not have believed them. It is the same story in the higher wor 
Nobody can describe the glories of God. 

INTELLECTUALS BELIEVE. 

Dr. Smith declared that athletic life could never make one pass his examii 
tions. He must cultivate the intellectual side. "And neither can the schola 
life make it a full one," he said. "He may be a man of ponderous learning a. 
yet be blind as to the spiritual life. And some of us have come to believe th 
scholarship shuts out the spiritual life, that the intellectuals are unbelievers. 

"If this were so, and it isn't, it would be no indictment of the spiritual li 
Great scholars do not believe as a matter of course. We do nothing as a matt 
of course. 

"Children, when this school was built it had in mind the triple life. I imagi: 
that if it were asked as Swarthmore was asked to cut out athletics and recer 
$100,000 it would not do it. Neither would it give up its spiritual life for m 
lions and millions." 



The Merchant of Venice 

On Saturday evening, May 24th, the Dramatic Club, directed by Ml 
Florence C. Davis, gave a fine production of the "Merchant of Venice. 
The audience overflowed the Auditorium and were enthusiastic in thei 
applause, which wa3 richly deserved. The performance went throug 
to the end with smoothness and ease and with a full understanding o 
the part of the players of both the humor and the tragedy of the situs 



The St. Mary's Muse. 169 



tot 



>ns. No stage effects were attempted, but the costumes were richly 

■ective and correct, historically. 

The work of Elizabeth Tarry as Portia, Virginia Bonner as Shyloch, 
foil d of Mary Willis as the clown was especially noteworthy, but all of 

e actors are to be highly commended. Miss Davis should feel amply 

paid for her efforts. 

as. The cast was as follows : 

'' ie Duke of Venice Julia Cooper 

ie Prince of Morocco \ i Mary Washburn 

„ A I Suitors to Portia < „, TJ .„ 

ie Prince of Aragon f i Eleanor Hill 

>ttonio, a merchant of Venice Josephine Wilson 

issanio, his friend, suitor to Portia Elizabeth Carrison 

lLAnio \ i Maude Reynolds 

kLARiNO > Friends to Antonio and Bassaino I Julia Bond 

jatiano \ ( Buford Aiken 

)renzo, in love with Jessica Jane Kerr 

iylock, a rich Jew Virginia Bonner 

[jbal, a Jew, his friend Mary Michaux 

4.uncelot Gobbo, the clown, servant to Shy lock Mary Willis 

id Gobbo, father to Launcelot Laura Clark 

althasar, servant to Portia Mary C. Smith 

ortia, a rich heiress Elizabeth Tarry 

erissa, her waiting maid Frances Walker 

sssica, daughter to Shylock Lois Pugh 

Etta Burt 
fficers of the Court of Justice 



Belle Prairie 

lerk Janie Underwood 



Class Day Exercises 

Monday morning school girls and guests assembled under the old oaks 
a the Grove, waiting eagerly for eleven o'clock to arrive. Promptly on 
he hour the procession of thirteen Seniors, bearing their great cable of 
j.aisies, appeared at the door of old East Rock and walked out across the 
li.Tass to their places around the dais prepared for their President, Caro- 
lina Jones, who led the procession, and who presided during the exer- 
cises. 

The President made her speech of welcome, which was followed by 

[ he class history read by Amy Winston. Evelyn Maxwell then read 

he last will and testament of the class, in which numerous bequests were 



170 The St. Mary's Muse. 



made to the Junior Class and to others of the School. Then came tl 
class prophecy, read by Mary Butler. As she reached the first vers 
telling of the vocations of the Seniors, out of West Rock door appear* 
a procession of tiny girls, in grotesque dress, who came and stood in 
line near the Seniors. There were thirteen of them, and each one w; 
dressed to represent the prophecy made in the verses. As each Senior 
verse came, her little prototype stepped forward to her original, bowei 
and sat at her feet. It was the most original and attractive featm 
of the exercises. 

After the conclusion of the prophecy, which is given in full belo\ 
Alma Mater was sung by all, and the exercises closed by a little h 
formal reception there on the lawn. 

Prophecy 

Sing a song of Thirteen, 

Hear me prophesy 
Happy maidens' futures, 

Buried in a pie. 

When the pie is opened 

See what we shall see, 
Thirteen maids of thirteen 

As they look in twenty-three. 

Gaze upon them closely, 

Every single one; 
Maybe we can thusly 

See what they have done. 

You need not go to London 

To see a suffragette; 
This fighter is our Cherry, 

You will not soon forget. 

This intellectual's cap and gown 

Proclaim her college days; 
But Mary Butler's fate was sure 

Before we knew her ways. 

This sister soul likewise stands high, 

She's mathematics teacher; 
In her you see Miss Margaret Leard, 

Correct in every feature. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 171 

Who is this hoeing cotton 

In blue jean overalls? 
It's Farmer Ellen Johnson, 

On whom the city palls. 

This poet's truly classic brow 

Deserved the laurel crowning; 
It's Alice Lacy we have here, 

A second Mrs. Browning. 

And here's a famous lawyer, 

In practice wondrous kind; 
The calm unbiased legal soul 

Shows Jennie Woodruff's mind. 

You've seen her at the circus, 

This gay equestrian queen; 
The match of our friend Caroline 

Perhaps is never seen. 

This famous cook's beyond your reach 

if you would think of hiring; 
But recognize Rebecca Kyle, 

The modest and retiring. 

And here's a charming French modiste, 

Her shop's a grand affair; 
World wide's the fame of Evelyn, 

Her gowns have such an air. 

The secret of madam's success? 

Her model serves her well. 
Ah! Bessie White, the handsome girl, 

Makes madam's gowns look swell. 

In course of time we might admire 

This quite entrancing creature. 
What? Amy Winston! Can it be? 

A lusty female preacher! 

In years agone the practice hall 

Proclaimed the coming bride. 
Peep 'neath the veil — it's Lizzie Lee! 

How very dignified. 

In spite of youthful charms and grace, 

In spite of beaus galore, 
This rare old maid — Susannah, sure! 

I must not tell you more. 



172 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Sing a song of thirteen, 

Direful prophecy! 
Thirteen maids of thirteen, 

In nineteen twenty-three. 



1 



Alumnae Meeting 

An enthusiastic representation from the Raleigh Chapter, supplemented 1 
scattering representatives from all parts of the State, the annual meeting of tl 
Alumnae Association of St. Mary's Monday afternoon was a phenomenal succes 

Following the disposition of the routine business, the Treasurer reported th; 
the sum of $1,000, the sum designed for the year's work, had been fully realize 
The Raleigh Chapter alone, of which Mrs. S. A. Ashe is chairman, contribute 
four hundred dollars. 

The report of the traveling secretaries showed the organization of twent 
eight new chapters of the Alumnae Association. 

Officers of the association for the ensuing year were chosen as follows 
President, Miss Anna Buxton; Vice-President, Mrs. Fab. Busbee; Secretary, Mi 
Kate McKimmon; Treasurer, Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank. The Council membe 
are Mrs. D. Elias and Mrs. Charles Baskerville. 

The Council made a report of the resolutions drawn up in memory of Mr 
R. W. Winston, who was at one time President of the Alumnae Association. 

A garden party by the Raleigh Chapter, complimentary to the Class of 191 
and to the visiting alumnae, concluded the program of the annual meeting of tt 
Alumnae Association. The natural beauty of the campus was added to by dec 
rations in coreopsis, which formed a golden mass in the center of the tabl 
where the refreshments were served. 



The Annual Art Exhibit 

A walk through the art room of St. Mary's shows an unusually interestin 
amount of work accomplished by the pupils of the school. Of course, by an 
one who is acquainted with the work and methods of the head of the depar 
ment, Miss Fenner, this is to be expected, because she is nothing if not energeti 
and advanced, and seems to be able to bring out all that is in a pupil. 

There are two new branches of art that show up very well in this exhibitioi 
the tinted charcoal work, which makes some beautiful effects like watercoloil 
but capable of more accent, and the plaster casting from original clay modeling | 
there is a fascination about the latter, it is so individual and striking, an 
makes such beautiful decorations fcr the home. Taken all in all, the presen 
exhibition shows a distinct advance even over the successful work of forme 
years. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 173 

The Annual Concert 

The Annual Concert, given May 26th in the Auditorium, was marked 

I ease and dignity, and a high standard of excellence in the program 

ad in the performance. All of the piano numbers were by certificate 

upils of the year, who amply justified their right to this honor. A 

elightful variety was given by the opening and closing numbers, the 

aautiful chorus showing at its best at both of these times. The singing 

F Misses Joyner, Sears and Brigham was also excellent. The follow- 

(jig is the program. 

x PART I. 

Ji Ave Maria Franz Abt 

Chorus. 
\\ Obligato by Miss Joyner. 

Clair de Lune Debussy 

v Miss Caroline Lockhart. 

i Sonata Tragica, Op. 45 MacDowell 

i\ Largo Maestoso. 

Miss Ruth Douglas. 

[| Chanson de Provencal DelV Acqua 

Miss Gertrude Brigham and Semi-chorus. 
f " Norwegian Group: 

[]i (a) Scherzino Ejerulf 

i\ (&) Serenade Olsen 

Iji (c) Dance Caprice Grieg 

Miss Leone S. Herbert. 

PART II. 

The Seasons MacFadyen 

Miss Frances Sears. 

r l Etudes Symphcniques, Op. 13 Schumann 

*l Finale. 

Miss Elizabeth Tarry. 

J (a) My Desire Nevin 

(6) The Year's at the Spring H. H. A. Beach 

Miss Arlene Joyner. 

J Witches' Dance MacDowell 

Miss Sarah Fenner. 

1 Sketches from Italy Gretscher 

(a) In Venice. 
'i (6) Caretta Siciliana (a gaudily painted cart). 

Chorus. 



174 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Rector's Reception 

After the Annual Concert Monday evening, the Rector's Receptioi 
was held in the School Parlor, which was attractively decorated for thi 
occasion. In the receiving line were Mr. and Mrs. Lay, Bishop am 
Mrs. Cheshire, Miss Schenck, the Lady Principal, Miss Kate McKim 
mon, the heads of the departments and the graduating class. Ice crean 
and cake were served by members of the Domestic Science Departmen 
and the Freshmen Class. A number of visitors from out of town wer< 
present, and the occasion was a very pleasant one 



i 
11 
I 
ii 



The Graduating Exercises and Address 

(Prom the News and Observer.) 

J 
The thirteen graduates of St. Mary's School yesterday heard Rev. Dr. C. I 

Wilmer's commencement address on "Individuality" and showed him what i 

was before he told them. 

The closing event levied heavily upon the crowd of the brother institutioi 
the A. and M. The charming School Auditorium was overtaxed and the stag 
was filled with ministers. Many members of the Board of Trustees were preser 
and the Raleigh people gave presence to a beautiful finale. The thirteen gir 
and the year thirteen were no ominous combination. 

Among the clergymen of the Episcopal Church were the two distinguishe 
prelates, Bishop Robert Strange, of Wilmington, and Bishop Joseph Blour 
Cheshire, of Raleigh. Rev. Messrs. Harris Mallinckrodt of Charlotte, B. {! 
Drane of Edenton, L. G. Wood of Charleston, S. C, M. A. Barber and J. E. Ingl 
of Raleigh, W. M. Dye of Lincolnton, and several prominent laymen besides wei 
visitors. 

After the thirteen graduates had taken their places on the stage, and aft€ 
Miss Prancesca King played the first piano solo, Miss Susannah Busbee read tfc 
salutatory by the grace of her high scholarship. 

Miss Evelyn Cameron Maxwell read a brief class essay. She had taken thir 
honor, and to her fell the lovely lot of being bright. She lived easily above tt 
ordinary, sallied cleverly into every realm, and won the commendation of ht 
exacting Rector, Dr. G. W. Lay. 

Both young women fell heirs to limitless flowers. They earned the prais 
And Miss Margaret Thomas sang with exquisite art two solos and Miss Gertrud 
Brigham, Amy Winston, Frances Sears, Elizabeth Cherry, Helen Wright, Frai 
cesca King, composing a sextette, gave a beautiful pastoral. 

THE ADDRESS. 

The minister chose "Individuality" as his text. He gave it a broad distinctio 
from individualism and personality. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 175 

The speaker handled the theme cleverly. While he spoke strongly for observ- 
ce of the best traditions, he was far from dividing the population into the two 
eat classes, bromides and sulphides. He was not willing to live in the ever- 
jting ruts of speech nor yet satisfied to see the world sitting on pins or in 
rpetual fear of being shocked by that rampant apostle, the individualist. 
''Personality he defined to be general, individuality to be personal, individualism 
;en the passion for extraction. The individualist disorganizes and upsets, but 
Jividuality is a grace. He showed by Georgia standards what individuality 
ght do. He declared Ty Cobb to be the most distinguished citizen of Georgia 
d Senator Hoke Smith the most prominent man after Cobb. He might have 
['oted ex-President Taft as authority for the declaration that Ty Cobb is better 
own than Taft. 

He made the audience laugh when he took a fall out of Virginia and South 
irolina, the mountains of conceit between which modest North Carolina lies. 
; said these States have been so well satisfied with their birth that they have 
t thought it necessary to be born again. And after he had taken these two 
iates off properly, one could justly draw the conclusion that he did not agree 
th them. 

SAME STANDARDS. 

But there are workable standards yet, he thought. He found both the deca- 
;ue and the multiplication table useful in morals and mathematics, both good 
stitutions. He predicted that these will still be in business at the old stand 

^ien the individualist shall have passed from the earth. He did not talk of 
iiman suffrage. The nearest that he came to it was his expressed sentiment 
at women will always be observed enough of the traditions to make home 

[sir real kingdom. 

He pleaded for catholicity, for democracy, and against that provincialism that 
mifests itself in clannishness and over-much boasting of virtue. He advo- 
ced "mixing." It had the. mountaineer's strong points, "it learns us both." 

THE VALEDICTORY. 

The valedictory was delivered by Miss Mary Brown Butler. As winner of the 
;hest honors, she was receiver of fine floral offerings and her address to the 
iss was made without notes. The juvenile honors went to Misses Bessie Folk 
d Margaret Newsome. 

The Rector made his short and parting address to the class and announced 
3 list of graduates, those who took diplomas and received certificates. 



The Salutatory of 1913 



Susannah Steele Busbee. 



i It is my pleasure on this glad day to welcome you, my friends, to St. 
ary's — you, our revered Bishop, the Trustees, our Rector, the Faculty, 



176 The St. Mary's Muse. 

the Alumnae, our visitors — and the girls — who have come to join wit] 
us on this our day. It is good to have you here, and I hope that som 
of the joy that is mine in welcoming may be yours in being with us. 



The Class Essay— The follies of the Fashions 



Evelyn Cameron Maxwell. 



People certainly are stupid about appreciating "everyday blessings 
No, I am not going to say how strange it ia that we are not continuall 
giving thanks because we were not all born "heathen Chinee," or ho 
fortunate we are to have our daily bread. I suppose everyone renliz( 
that for himself at some time or other. But does even the most gratl 
ful of us, in all his thanksgivings, ever thank Providence that some on 
else is responsible for the cut of his clothes ? It is quite bad to be calk 
upon to wear the styles ; but just suppose we could be held to account f( 
designing them ! Thoreau said : "The head monkey at Paris puts on 
traveler's cap, and all the monkeys in America do the same." No^ 
since the proper time to put on your cap, and the proper way to put c 
your cap, and, above all, the proper kind of cap to be put on changes 
continually we are quite fortunate that there is a "head monkey" wl 
can devote his entire interest to deciding these points for us. 

It is a decidedly important matter — this decision. Of course 01 
feels absurd dressed in fashion ; but one feels miserable dressed out 
fashion, and of course it is better to be ridiculous than to be unhapp 
Yet how would we ever know what the fashions were if we had no "he; 
monkey" to tell us ? For instance, how many of us could ever ha 
gue-sed, without being told, that the tighter, and the heavier, and t' 
more cumbersome a skirt is, the more suitable it is for walking ? In o 
pitiful ignorance we should have thought just the opposite — and shou 
have gone through our walk of life in the wrong kind of skirt ! 

Surely only a p°st-m aster could recognize the significance of differe 
kinds of dress. No ordinary mind would have realized that the tall li 
of the stern and righteous "Puritan Fathers" was the very one whi 
should later be selected as the most characteristic head dress of all t 



.. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 177 

jodern young roues and sports. Whether or not we would have guessed 
I it is a fact. Benjamin Franklin adopted the tall hat of the Pilgrims 
!id introduced it into Europe. Lo and behold ! the rulers of fashion 
cognize the hat of "Father Piety" as the very one most suited to com- 
ete the costume of Milord's gay young son. 

; But more difficult than knowing which new styles to adopt is knowing 
\y new styles to adopt. To the average person it would seem that 

"All manner of things that a woman can put 
On the crown of her head— or the sole of her foot, 
Or wrap 'round her shoulders — or fit 'round her waist, 
Or that can be sewed on, or pinned on, or laced, 
Or tied on with a string, or stitched on with a bow, 
In front or behind — above or below," 

t ive all been used up. However, that "head monkey" is not an average 
srson. He — or she — or it — has more ingenuity than the originator of 
e Spanish Inquisition. It is ingenuity much on the same order, too. 
j.e, or she, or it knows that all the lesser monkeys will try anything 
ice — but few things twice. Only the less civilized nations would 
'earn of holding to the styles of their ancestors — no matter how pretty. 
s long as Japan was a closed and isolated country its women wore 
mona«. Since the only variations could be made in color and texture, 
e talents of artists were given to designing the materials. It was ap- 
"eciated — and the pride with which the gorgeous silks were kept repaid 
te artist for his pains. These kimonas were serviceable — and these 
imonas are beautiful. But since Japan has been in contact with more 
llightened nations it is "learning better." Gradually its women are 
jading out that the thing to do is to change their styles every six months. 
J It has been so with every country. The more civilized it becomes the 
t .ore frequently it changes its fashions. And this has not only ex- 
busted the pretty styles, but has made the clothes of a poorer grade, 
hakespeare said "the fashion wears out more apparel than the man." 
ut since Shakespeare wrote that, the fashion and the man have gotten 
( ,Dout even. No care or interest is given to designing materials, and 
-taking clothes, that are doomed to the cook — or the ragman — in such a 
lort time. There is no sense in making things durable if they are to 
3 discarded whether they wear out or not. So as soon as you start to 



• 



178 The St. Mary's Muse. 

wear a dress, the dress starts to wear out. It just furnishes one reasoi 
for changing. And I imagine that we do change so often, that even th> 
"Grand Mogul of the Fashion Sheets" is, at times, hard pressed for ne\ 
ideas. If he were not, I hardly believe that even he would bring forti 
some of the queer customs that have been accepted. In the huge coiffure 
of 1720 women wore flowers set in little bottles of water! If ther 
were enough new ideas, no old ones would ever have been revived 

New ideas will keep on coming, however. They always do — and a] 
ways get worse as they get newer. Since skirts have become so narrow 
that they have had to be split, there is nothing more to be gained i| 
that direction — they will probably develop in the opposite directioi 
now. 

But you never can tell about the outlandish styles of dre3S. The onl; 
thing you can tell is that the next thing will be sure to render woma 
more helpless than the last. An Indian Papoose — or an Egyptian mun 
my case — would be comfortable compared with what women wear. A: 
they think of is how to have clothes a bit more chic than their neighbo 
has. It is a pity that they can't get their minds on some slightly diife 
ent subjects, too. Clothes are very nice things to have many of — b: 
there is no reason for them to be the one interest in life. The old jing 
of "Miss Flora McFlimsey of Madison Square" who had "plenty i 
clothes but nothing to wear" strikes the right note when it ends — 

"And oh, if perchance there should be a sphere 
Where all is made right which so puzzles us here, 
When the glitter and glare, and the tinsel of time, 
Fade and die in the light of that region sublime, 
Where the soul, disenchanted of flesh and of sense, 
Unscreened by its trappings and shows and pretense, 
Must be clothed for the life and the service above 
With purity — truth — faith — meekness — and love, 
Oh Daughters of Earth! Foolish Virgins, beware! 
Lest in that upper realm you have nothing to wear!" 



• 



I 



The St. Mary's Muse. 179 



The Valedictory of 1913 



Mary Brown Butler. 



On this glad commencement day, toward which we've been looking 
t the last four years of our lives, I stand here, my friends, as the 
Dresentative of my class to bid you all farewell. 

Many seem to think that on commencement day those who are about 
leave school are thinking of the future and of what they intend to do 
years to come. But we know that it is not the coming years, but the 
h ones that are most in our minds, and that it is those things that 
ive made our lives here so pleasant and happy of which we are think- 
£. And it is this that makes it hard to say "Good-bye." It is not 
ij to say it to you today. It is not easy to say good-bye to this dear 
, Mary's and to all that belongs to it ; for today everything seems 
arer than in those days of work and play, of difficulties and happiness 
, the four years of our lives here. 

It is with sincere regret that we say farewell to our most worthy 
ictor and to all of you who have been our teachers and advisers during 
,r school life — spending and being spent for us. To the fathers and 
,»thers who have come to see us graduate, it is unnecessary for us to 
r good-bye, for we feel that this is as much their graduation as ours. 
To you who have been our schoolmates, and who are to take our places 
the coming years, we extend a fond farewell, and wish you all the joy 
d succe:s possible, when your graduation day shall come! 
And now dear classmates, the hardeot task of all has come. We, 
•io have worked together so long must now part, possibly never to meet 
■ain in unbroken circle. We feel today as we have never felt before 
it it is very hard to part. We realize most keenly that this moment 
3 in it more than a passing tinge of sadness. We begin to understand 
it every life is a checkered one — -made up of sunshine and of shadow. 
'S, most truly and beautifully has it been said, "Into each life some 
n must fall, some days be dark and dreary." 

But with faces and hearts turned heavenward, under the guidance 
a kind Providence, in the language of the same sweet poet, "Let us 
be up and doing, with a heart for any fate, still achieving, still pur- 



180 The St. Mary's Muse. 

suing, learn to labor and to wait." And at most of these waiting time 
may be twin sisters, Sweet Retrospection and Joyous Anticipation stan< 
on either side of a contented present, made contented because of dut; 
well done. 

With this thought among the uppermost ones in my mind, in behal 
of the Class of 1913, I bid you all, beloved Rector, esteemed Lady Prii] 
cipal, honored Trustees, kind teachers, dear schoolmates, dearest class 
mates, friends all, I bid you an affectionate farewell. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 181 



W$t Commencement honors; of 1913 



$rtmarp department honors 

Honor Roll of the Primary Department: 

Margaret Denson Raney 

Elizabeth Woollcott 

Lucy Fitzhugh Lay 

Corrinne Frances Rosenthal 

Adelaide Snow Boylston 

Mary Strange Morgan 

Virginia Harrison Lay 
The following have Satisfactorily Completed the Primary 
Course: 

Elizabeth Whitely Baker 

Sallie Taliaferro Cameron 

Charlotte Elizabeth Johnson 
The following are Commended for First-year Work: 

Virginia Lay (for Reading) 

Isabel Jones (for Reading) 

Jean Galbraith McCarty (for Writing) 
The following are Commended for Regular Attendance: 

Margaret Denson Raney 

Wyndham Trapier Ashe 

Janie Helen Staudt 

Elizabeth Woollcott 

Jlotoer preparatory Honors: 

'io be Commended for General Excellence: 

Bessie McMorine Folk 
To be Commended for Excellence in Work: 

Mary Hoke 

Virginia Newsom 

Class! -promotions in tfje College 

To be Seniors (//2 points) : 
Julia Washington Allen 
Emma Bettis Bou' night 
Laura Placidia Clark 
Julia Horner Cooper 
Sophronia Moore Cooper 
Grace Kearney Crews 
Sallie Kirk Heyward 
Laura Margaret. Hoppe 
Melba McCullers 



182 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Susie Mclver 

Kate Hale Silver 

Josephine Valentine Smith 

Myrtle Wilson Warren 

Mary Glenn Tyson 
To be Juniors (SO points) : 

Courtney deForest Crowther 

Ruth Douglas 

Elizabeth Atkinson Lay 

Helen Read Peoples 

Agnes Reese 

Florence Douglas Stone 

Frances Lambert Strong 

Frances Warner Walker 

Nellie Robbins Wood 
To be Sophomores (15 points) : 

Bessie Weimer Badham 

Julia Dodson Bond 

Virginia Lucile Bonner 

Annie Sutton Cameron 

Elizabeth Carrison 

Florence Clarke 

Mabel Cohen 

Katherine Lucile Condrey 

Marie Justin Curtice 

Mary Dortch 

Dorothy Shaw Fairley 

Mary Auning Floyd 

Selena Emma Galbraith 

Sallie Louisa Gatling 

Frances Royall Geitner 

Matilda Jordan Hancock 

Eleanor Mary Hill 

Louise Cary Huggins 

Anna Belle King 

Katherine Leigh Lassister 

Mary Norcott London 

Edna Earle Mann 

Edith Matilda Mann 

Margaret Emma Mann 

Kate Lois Montgomery 

Albertine Crudup Moore 

Josephine McKee Mclver 

Lois Pugh 

Mary Salisbury 

Eliza Fisk Skinner 



The St. Mary's Muse. 183 

Clara Mason Smith 
Marion Waller Stanford 
Sadie Vinson 

Katherine Mortimer Ward 
Pencie Creecy Warren 
Josephine Saville Wilson 
Helen Cherry Wright 
Gladys Eccles Yates 
To be Freshmen: 

Buford King Aiken 
Anna Rogers Hodgson 
Camelia Rutherford London 
Mildred Inez Nottingham 
Mary Elizabeth Washburn 

To be Conditioned Freshmen (one condition): 
Bessie Anderson Burdine 
Alice Lorraine McKenzie 
Dorothy Shepherd Parker 
Mary Frances Pender 
Winifred Richards Rogers 
Leah Marion Smith 
Annie Belle Williams 

tEfie Honor 2&oll of 191243 

The highest general award of merit open to all members 
of the School is the Honor Roll. 

In order to be entitled to a place on the Honor Roll the 
student must have been in attendance throughout the ses- 
sion, have taken a full regular course of study or its equiva- 
lent, and have passed all examinations. 

In addition, she must have maintained an average of 
"Very Good" (90% or better) in her studies, have made a 
record of Excellent (less than two demerits) in Deport- 
ment, Industry and Punctuality; and have maintained a 
generally satisfactory bearing in the affairs of her school 
life during the year. 

Under these conditions, those entitled to places on the 
Honor Roll this year are: 

College and Upper Preparatory : 
Julia Washington Allen, '14 
Bessie Weimer Badham, '16 
Susannah Steele Busbee, '13 
Mary Brown Butler, '13 
Laura Placidia Clark, '14 
Mary Auning Floyd, '16 



184 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Rebecca Devereux Kyle, '13 
Alice Loretta Lacy, '13 
Melba McCullers, '14 
Helen Read Peoples, '15 
Josephine Valentine Smith, '14 
Myrtle Wilson "Warren, '15 
Josephine Saville "Wilson, '16 
Lower Preparatory : 

Bessie McMorine Folk 

Certtfiraieg 

Certificated of tfje JSusmess Department 

Full Certificate 

Mary Gray Robertson Columbia, S. C. 

In Stenography and Typewriting 

Mayme Ruth Ball Raleigh, N. C. 

Nathalia Bryan Gould Raleigh, N. C. 

Nettie Leary Perkins Raleigh, N. C. 

Susie "Womack Taylor Raleigh, N. C. 

In Typewriting 

Vivian Paton Betts Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Hilda Bradly Raleigh, N. C. 

Certificates in domestic £i>rienee department 

Ellen Armistead John Knoxville, Tenn. 

Elise Gordon Stiles Malbone, Ga. 

Anne Page Turpin Macon, Ga. 

Certificate in girt Department 
Evelyn Cameron Maxwell Pensacola, Fla. 

Certificates in fflusic Department 
In Piano 

Ruth Douglas Preston, Md. 

Leone Sydney Herbert Morehead City, N. C. 

Caroline Ashe Lockhart Wadesboro, N. C. 

Elizabeth Anderson Tarry "Woodworth, N. C. 

Diplomas in fHnsit 

In Piano 

Sarah Baker Fenner Raleigh, N. C. 

In Organ 
Susan Porter Rawlings "Wilson, N. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 185 

Oflje diratmates 

College Class of 1913 

Mary Brown Butler (First Honor) Henderson, N. C. 

Susannah Steele Busbee (Second Honor) Raleigh, N. C. 

Elizabeth Melton Cherry Raleigh, N. C. 

Ellen Armistead Johnson Knoxville, Tenn. 

Carolina Clark Jones Charlotte, N. C. 

Rebecca Devereux Kyle Norfolk, Va. 

Alice Loretta Lacy Raleigh, N. C. 

Margaret Agnes Leard Raleigh, N. C. 

Lizzie Hinton Lee, 2d Raleigh, N. C. 

Evelyn Cameron Maxwell Pensacola, Fla. 

Elizabeth Peele White Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Amabel Conyers Winston Raleigh, N. C. 

Jennie Elizabeth Woodruff Summerville, S. C. 

Special $ri?pg 

(1) Bishop Parker Botany Prize 
The Bishop Parker Botany Prize is given annually by Rt. 
Rev. Edward M. Parker, D.D., Bishop-coadjutor of New 
Hampshire, to the student who in accordance with the 
conditions does the best work in the preparation of a 
herbarium. 

Was awarded in 1913 to 

Miss Virginia Lucile Bonner 

(2) The Niles Medal 
The Niles Medal, given by Rev. Chas. M. Niles, D.D., now 
of Atlantic City, N. J., is given annually to that student 
who in addition to meeting the conditions for the Honor 
Roll, and being a regular member of the College, has the 
highest average in her studies. 
This medal is awarded to the same student only once. 
For the second time since the medal has been given, the 
student who stands first is ineligible through having al- 
ready received it. 
The highest average of the year is that of 

Miss Mary Brown Butler, of the Senior Class, who was 
awarded the medal last year, and Whose average is 
95.95. 
The medal was therefore awarded this year to the student 
whose average is second, and was given to 

Miss Julia Washington Allen, of the Junior Class, whose 
average is 93.31. 



186 The St. Mary's Muse. 



s 



The Vacation Muse 

This Vacation Number of the Muse gives a chance for a little retr< 
spect at the commencement season, the close of a very successful session 
some personal notes of St. Mary's people and their summer doings, an« 
announcements that are of special interest in thinking of the sessioi D |i 
ahead. 

It is issued in the interregnum between the passing of the Muse Boarc 
of 1913 and the taking up the reins by the Editors of 1914, and i 
therefore a fit place in which to express appreciation of the good worl 
of the old Board and faith in the new Board for the work ahead. 

Miss Caroline Jones and her fellow-editors have been efficient worker- 
in getting out the Muse in 1912-'13, and the business affairs have beei 
very capably managed by Miss Jennie Woodruff, the Business Man 
ager; their successors who take charge in September, are Miss Laun 
Margaret Hoppe and Miss Sallie Heyward, both already proved fj 
their work on the Muse, for the Muse Club, and in the School generally 
The Muse may be expected to go forward in 1913-'14. 

■ 

The Annual Muse 

The annual Muse of 1914, which appeared at the usual date, Clas 
Day, just before Graduation Day, was the fifteenth annual student yearL 
book, and kept up to past records by proving to be the best volume ti 
date. There is a great contrast between the year-books of today in sizi 
and style and the simple little volume that of which the girls of '99 at St 
Mary's were so well pleased. 

Following the style which is still the favorite of St. Mary's girls 
the 1913 Muse again has flexible covers, being bound in purple ooze 
lined with violet silk, the purple and violet being the colors of the Clas 
of '13. The book is from the presses of the Edwards & Broughtoi 
Printing Co., of Baleigh, the photographs were made by Tyree, and th 
engraving work was done by the Electric City Engraving Company, o 
Buffalo. The special thanks of all those interested in the book are du^ 
to Mr. Keelin, of Edwards & Broughton, for the way he handled th 
publication. 

The most attractive feature of the book is the attractive use of th< 



The St. Maky's Muse. 187 



t scheme, and the very effective art decoration which is the work 
liss Frances Bottum. The purple cover, the violet silk lining, the 
et [ ;led violet fly-leaf, and the violet tint pine-cone conventionalized 
S!( ( te lending color in the border to each page, blend together very 
a i singly. The paper is Strathmore deckle-edge with the pictures 
a 'ited in duotone ink, pebbled, and pasted in. 

he border design, the design for the double page panorama picture 
he buildings and the frames for the Senior and Certificate pictures, 
>oth of which Miss Bottum worked the cotton plant and boll into 
[ conventionalized design, are probably the most striking art effects. 
['he volume is dedicated to Mr. Wm. E. Stone of the Faculty, the 
'aorary Member of the Senior Class, and marks the tenth year of his 
>k at St. Mary's. The Alumnse section, including among other new 
igs the page of the five "Original Girls," of whom only Mrs. Annie 
ywood Ruffin, of Raleigh, is still living, and the double page con- 
sist of the groups of Girls of the '60s of the '80s and of today, and the 
j| reproduction in the Muse of the Ravenscroft and Confirmation 
mtings in the Parlor, for which the plates were loaned by Mr. 
rshall deLancey Haywood from his "Bishops of North Carolina," 
also especially attractive. 

Mr. Hodgson, "Chaw Sir," is represented by the illustrated repro- 
fetion of his "An Orrible Tale," with which he first acquainted St, 
try's girls at the Sophomore Party in April, but which he wrote 
.ong the other gems of his youth. And most of the personal allusions 
i| found in the "Bulletin of Intimacies" — "Not sense but nonsense," 
dch is printed as a separate booklet, neatly tied with purple cord and 
racted to the "Bulletin Board." 

The "Blue Book" of addresses, etc. — a "student directory," which 
is first issued last year and was so popular — is also issued again as a 
rt of the Muse but a separate booklet, with St. Mary's blue cover, and 
convenient size for reference in summer correspondence. 
Altogether the 1913 Muse is very satisfactory, and we can but hope 
at we shall be able to surpass it another year. 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



Student Leaders for 1913-14 

At the meetings of the several organizations near the close of 1 
last session, leaders for the next session were chosen as follows : 

Myrtle Warren Chairman of the Muse Club 

Laura Margaret Hoppe Editor-in-Chief of The Muse 

Saljlje Hey ward Business Manager of The Muse 

Lajmie Hales President of Sigma Lambda 

Susie McIver President of Epsilon Alpha Pi 

Laura Clark President of Alpha Rho 

The presidents of the class organizations and the leaders of t 
Sigma and Mu Athletic Clubs are not chosen until the opening of t 
new session. 

The faculty and Officers for 1913-14 

Each season brings its change in the teaching force as in the studer 
body, and while we part with old friends with regret, our interest tur 
largely, as is the way of the world, to the new comers who are, we hop 
to be our friends. 

Of hrst interest of course in thinking of the faculty for the comii 
year is the return of Miss Thomas as Lady Principal and Head of tl 
English Department. Miss Thomas first came to St. Mary's twel 
years ago, in Dr. Bratton's Rectorship, fresh from her course at tl 
College for Momen in Columbia, S. C, where she received the A. L 
and the A. M. degrees, and she has been at St. Mary's all the yea 
since that time except 1904, when she was resting; 1905, when si 
taught at Greenville College, S. C, and last year, when she was studin 
at Teachers' College, Columbia University. She came to St. Mary 
to teach Mathematics, was transferred after a year to the English Di 
partment and has been head of it since 1905, and Lady Principal sine 
1909. She has always been not only one of the most successful bi 
one of the most popular teachers, and in the more intimate relation o 
Lady Principal has always won and held the respect and love of a 
the St. Mary's girls in her charge. So her return after the year's al 
sence is a eource of great pleasure to all who know her, and will be t 
the new girls of the coming year when they have the pleasure of knovv 
insr her. 



lis 



■'.. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 189 



IMiss Thomas spent the past year in study in New York City in work 

■ her Master's degree in Education and at the recent Commencement 

eived the B. S. in Education from Columbia University. Her work 

in both Teachers' College and Barnard, and included among others 

irses under Dr. Thorndike in Psychology and Brander Matthews 

1 Baker in English and Education. 

During the year's absence of Miss Thomas her post as Lady Principal 

s filled by Miss Rebecca Schenck, formerly of the State Normal Col- 

e, and Mr. Stone was the Acting Head of the English Department. 

f The only really new head of a department in the College for the com- 

t; year is Miss A. Jouet McGavock, who was last year a fellow-student 

:h Miss Thomas at Columbia, and who succeeds Miss Urquhart in 

irge of the Latin. Miss McMcGavock is a Virginian, her home being 

'Max Meadows in Wythe County. After finishing at Wytheville 

rninary, she spent six years as a student at Randolph Macon Woman's 

illege, Lynchburg, receiving the Bachelor's degree in 1899 and the 

ister's degree in 1900. She taught successively and successfully at 

mewall Jackson Institute, Abingdon, St. Mary's Llall, San Antonio, 

xas, and The Bishop's School, San Diego, Cal., and returned to 

,>newall Jackson Institute in 1912 as Lady Principal as we-1 as in 

irge of the Latin. She completed her work for the Columbia Degree 

.Teachers' College the past year and received the M. A. in Education 

ithe recent Commencement. 

IVIr. Stone, Mr. Cruikshank, Miss Ricks and Mile. Rudnicka will 

linue at the head of their departments the coming session, and Miss 

attuck will continue with her work in English. 

iss Frances Bottum, who graduated at St. Mary's in 1912, and 

] ght the lower classes in Science so successfully last session is study- 
§1 . ... . . . 

; in the Columbia Univerity Summer Session this summer with a 

w to doing more teching in the Science Department the coming year. 

m the Music Department, Miss Dowd continues as Director and 

ad of the Piano Department, and Mr. Owen continues as Head of 

Voice Department, the most important change being; the addition 

Miss Abbott to be in charge of Violin. After the resignation of 

ss Parke in the early part of last session, through the courtesy of 



•J ' 



pi 



190 The St. Mary's Muse. 

President Ramsay of Peace Institute, Miss Paulsen of Peace acted verj 
acceptably as teacher of Violin at St. Mary's for the rest of the session; 
Miss Abbott takes up this work the coming session as the resideni 
teacher. 

Miss Beatrice Muriel Abbott is a New Yorker, her home being a 
Union Springs on Cayuga Lake. She was educated at Wells College 
Aurora, and at the Peabody Conservatory, Baltimore, where she wajl 
a pupil of van Hulsteyn, before going abroad in 1906. Abroad, shl 
studied for three years at Prague, Bohemia, with the great master; 
Sevcik, who was also Miss Hull's and Miss Sherwin's teacher, am 
then was for two sessions in Geneva, Switzerland, where she took \ t 
First Diploma. On returning to America she taught first at Weill I 
College, her alma mater, and was last year at Columbia College, Coluir. 
bia, S. C. 

Two of the other four newcomers in the Music Faculty are ol 
friends — Miss Shields and Miss Shull ; and Miss Roberts is also ver fo 
well and favorably known in Raleigh, where she has been a successfi 
private teacher for a number of years. Miss Rowand and Miss Shu 
will assist Mr. Owen in Voice, and Miss Roberts in Organ. Mis 
Isaacs, Miss Shields and Miss Roberts, in addition to Miss Dowd an L 
Miss Phillips, will teach Piano. | (( ; 

Miss Rebe Hill Shields of Scotland Neck, after four years at S jj: 
Mary's graduated in 1910, at the same time taking the Certificate i m 
Piano. She had been a pupil of Miss Chelian Pixley, who left S L 
Mary's to become Director of Music at Fassifern. The year after h< ,,j 
graduation, Miss Shields taught in the Scotland Neck Public Schoo |, 
and the following summer studied in New York City at the Virg f; . 
Piano School, receiving the Certificate, and in the fall she became Mi 
Pixley's assistant at Fassifern. She has taught there the past two yea, | 
and will be warmly welcomed back to St. Mary's this fall. 

Miss Zona May Shull attracted the attention of Mr. Owen in t 
summer of 1910, which he spent with his parents in Missoula, Montan 
She was one of his private pupils that summer and returned with hi 
to St. Mary's to continue her studies in music. She took the Certifies 
in Voice under Mr. Owen in 1911, and the following year assist I 



The St. Mary's Muse. 191 

1 Owen while continuing her studies. At the Commencement of 
} she received the Diploma in Voice and the Certificate in Piano. 

1 year she spent as a private teacher in Bluefield, West Virginia, 
this summer she as well as Mr. Owen is studing with Ellison Van 
se at his Summer School and Camp, Melody Lodge in the Adiron- 
:s. 

; l"iss Eheta Isaacs, now of New York City, graduated in 1907 from 

\\ Bigelow's School, Kansas City, Mo., and went abroad the follow- 
year to continue her musical studies. She studied for a year with 
ihetizky in Vienna and then for three years at the Klindworth- 
warwenka Conservatory in Berlin from which she received the 
ificate in 1911. She taught while studying in Berlin and has since 
>| ! l a private teacher in New York City. 
[iss Ebie Roberts of Raleigh has received all her education here. 

1 has been a pupil of Mr. Owen since he has been in Raleigh and 

been very successful in assisting him on the Christ Church Organ. 

>' \ has had a large private class of piano pupils in the city for a num- 

of years. She will now be a resident teacher at St. Mary's and will 

1 charge of the Chapel organ. 
an Iiss Davis, who is studying this summer in Boston, continues at the 

ti of the Elocution Department, Miss Fenner at the head of the Art, 
Miss Lee of the Business Department. Miss Lane is succeeded in 
aestic Science by Miss Metcalfe. 

iiss Hazel Alice Metcalfe is a resident of Chicago. She graduated 

'a the John Marshall High School in 1911 and has since then been 

lO'Yudent in Household Arts at Lewis Institute, Chicago, one of the 

ir Mest and best-known schools of its kind in the country. She finished 

M : course there, receiving the title of Associate, at the recent Com- 

ef cement. Her work there included Settlement teaching. It will 

iliss Metcalfe's responsibility to continue Miss Lane's good work in 

aestic Science, and to inaugurate the course in Domestic Art (Sew- 

etc), which will begin the coming year. 

M"he Intermediate Department will be strengthened the coming year 

of] he coming of Miss Lucy Elizabeth Robins, who will have charge of 

nd devote her whole time to its classes. She succeeds Miss Hav- 



192 The St. Mary's Muse. 



■i 



: 



i 



wood. Miss Robins is from Gloucester, Va. After finishing at the 
Glebe School, Gloucester, in 1904, she spent five years at the State 
Normal School, at Farmville, Va., from which she graduated in 1910. 
She has since been very successful as a teacher in the Public Schools of 
Virginia, having taught last session at Bristol. 

Miss McKimmon will continue in charge of the Primary School as 
for so many years past. 

There will be no changes among the Officers, other than that incident 
to the retiring of Miss Lane. Miss Lillian Fenner, who has been her 
assistant as Housekeeper, will succeed her in that department, and Miss 
Elise Stiles, who received her Certificate in Domestic Science at the 
recent Commencement, will be Assistant Housekeeper, supervising the 
work outside of Clement Hall. 

This article will serve as a brief introduction to the incoming teach 
ers, to each of whom we extent a warm greeting and for each of whom 
we wish much success in their new work. We hope to be their friends 
and believe that they will be ours. 

With the Rector and Teachers this Summer 

The Rector has been enjoying this summer, the first vacation of any 
length he has enjoyed since he took charge of the School six years ago 
The Trustees at their Annual Meeting suggested that he take a rest 
of some weeks this summer, and he and Mrs. Lay left the lait week 
in June for a six weeks visit to Colorado. They went via the C. & Oj 
and Chicago, to Colorado Springs, where they met old friends and had 
some very enjoyable experiences, including a 110 mile automobile trip 
through the Royal Gorge. Most of their trip is being spent at Telln- 
ride, with Mr. Henry Lay, the Rector's elder brother, whom we have 
been glad to welcome several times at the School, and whose home ha= 
been for many years in Colorado, where he practices Mining Engineer 
ing. Mr. and Mr3. Lay leave Telluride about August 5th for the 
homeward journey, and after brief stops at Chicago and Charlestown 
West Va., expect to be back at St. Mary's August 15th. 

During- the absence of Mr. and Mrs. Lay, Miss Grace Balch, Mrsj 
Lay's sister, has been presiding at the Rectory. The children are 



I:': 



v 



The St. Mary's Muse. 193 

lome, except George, who has been spending the early part of his vaca- 
ion from St. Paul's School in his uncle's camp in New Hampshire, 
'ile is expected at St. Mary's about the middle of August for the rest 
( if the summer. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank, and Miss Sutton, with Miss Balch and 
he Lay children made up the School family during July. Mr. Cruik- 
hank and Miss Sutton are kept steadily busy with the summer work, 
ait as usual St. Mary's proves as cool or a little cooler than other places, 
md, hard as it is for the girls who are not around to believe it, is decid- 
edly more restful than lonely. 

[ Mrs. Stuart of Baltimore, Mr. Cruikshank's sister, with her two 
'children paid Mr. and Mrs. Cruikshank a visit in July, amd Mi-s 
Thomas was able to run up to the School for a few days on her round 
if visits to her relatives in South Carolina. She came up from Cheraw 
^n the 22d of July and went back there on the 25th, going a little 
la,ter with her brother, Rev. Albert Thomas, and Mrs. Thomas (Emily 
Harrison) and their two little boys for a stay in the Carolina mountains. 
n addition to these visits, the coming of parents from time to time for 
i look at the School and the dropping in of the old girls who have time 
!m their summer wanderings to get in a call, serve to preserve the 
School atmosphere. 

The Stones were a.t their house on Boylan Avenue during June and 
•hen closed it and went to Greensboro as usual, to be with Mrs. Dick, 
Mrs. Stone's mother, for the rest of the summer. Mr. Stone visited 
H'or the School during July, beginning with the meeting of the Coim- 
:»;il of Asheville at Brevard, where he spoke very effectively late in 
'fune. He has met various St. Mary's girls as he has traveled through 
•ihe western Carolina towns and regretted missing others. His trip 
"nded at Winston on the 21st, and he plans to go with Mrs. Stone 
fund Florence for a stay at Blowing Rock during August. 
f Miss Clara Fenner, with her party of five, three of them St. Mary's 
!;irls — Elinor and Belle Davis and Fannie Cooper of Henderson — hid 
: pleasant trip across the ocean to Venice in June and reports a very 
nteresting time in their European wanderings. The party is due 
3>ack in New York about September 10th. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernkst Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St Marv's Alumnae Association. 



Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

( Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Honorary Vice-Presidents - < Mrs. I. McK. Pittenger. Raleigh. 

(..Mrs. Bessie Hmedes Leak, West Durham. 
President .... Miss Anna Nash Buxton, Winston-Salem. 

Vice President - Mrs F. H. Busbee, Raleigh. 

Secretary ... - Miss Kate McKimmon. St. Mary's. 
Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh 



The Present Status of Alumnae Affairs 



A Brief Report of the May Meeting of the St. Mary's Alumnae, 1913 

As provided by the Constitution of the AlumnEe Association, tin 
annual meeting of the alumnse was held at St. Mary's during commence 
ment. This meeting of 1913 was the thirty-fourth annual meeting, and 
was held in the School Parlor on Monday, May 26th, beginning at foui 
o'clock. In the absence of the Vice-President, Mrs. Frank Wood, oj 
Edenton, the Secretary, Miss Kate McKimmon, presided. 

A roll call of chapters was substituted for the roll call of members, and 
it was found that besides the two delegates from Raleigh, the following 
chapters were represented: Chapel Hill (Mrs. Collier Cobb), Durham 
(Miss Bessie Erwin), Enfield (Miss Tissie Harrison), Hickory (Miss 
Shuford), Scotland Neck (Mrs. Chas. Herring), Wilson (Mi&3 Hales) 
Henderson (Miss Dortch for Miss Lamb). 

After tie reading of the minutes of the 1912 meeting, by the acting 
secretary, Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, the annual report of the Alumna 
Council was presented by Mrs. Robert Strong, of the Council. 

Report of the Alumnae Council, 1912-'13. 

In accordance with the provision in the Constitution which requires 
a written report from the Council at each annual meeting, summarizint 
its acts during the year, the Council begs leave to submit the following 
report : 



The St. Mary's Muse. 195 



There has been no need for formal meetings of the Council during 
the year, but the members have met informally and passed upon matters 
as follows : 

(1) Shortly after the last annual meeting the funds in the hands of 
the Treasurer amounted to $2,000, and in accordance with the resolution 
adopted at the annual meeting, she was directed to invest, and did in- 
vest this $2,000 in St. Mary's 6 per cent bonds, which she now holds for 
the association. 

In carrying out the further instructions of the association, the Treas- 
urer was directed to pay, and did pay, the interest received from the 
ibonds, the first semi-annual payment of which was due March 1st last, 
lipid the next payment of which will be due next September 1st, to 
|!Mrs. Iredell and Miss McKimmon. So that the association can now 

* feel that the Scholarship Funds, so much of them as has been raised, 

• are being applied to the purposes for which it was intended. 

(2) In further carrying out the instructions of the association at the 
last meeting, Miss Buxton and Miss Root, as traveling secretaries, were 
lauthcrized to go, and did go, for a three-weeks trip visiting the alumnse 
in the several towns in western and in eastern North Carolina, Miss 
IBuxton going also into South Carolina. The expenses of these trips, 
very moderate, were of course provided from the association's funds 
iand are accounted for in the report of the Treasurer. Miss Boot will 
isubmit a report of the trips of the traveling secretaries to supplement 
this report, but the Council wishes here to express its appreciation of 

"the work of the traveling secretaries and its belief that the trips they 
made have already proved of very much benefit to the association work. 

(3) The grief that the association felt in the loss of its President, 
Mrs. B. W. Winston, was expressed feebly for the members in resolu- 
tions drafted by the Council and sent to Judge Winston. They will 
be read here later in this meeting. 

(4) In further carrying out the wish of the association, a month ago 
the Council sent a letter to each of the towns visited by the traveling 
secretaries last fall, inviting them to, as far as possible, arrange to send 
delegates to this meeting. The result you see in the presence of at 
least a portion of the visiting alumnse here. The Baleigh Chapter 



. 



196 The St. Mary's Muse. 



fl 



cordially offered to entertain such delegates as should be appointed, and 
also arranged for a lawn party in their honor and that of the Senior 
Class. This party will be held this afternoon, as you know. 

(5) When through the good work of the Raleigh Chapter in paying 
in to the association treasury some $350 three weeks ago, it once more' 1 
looked possible that the $1,000 which the association had determined to 
raise if possible this year for the Scholarship Fund, might be obtained II 
if the chapters would but pay in their regular dues, the Council issued 
a second letter through the Treasurer stating that $800 of the $1,000 
was in hand, and asking every chapter to make every effort to forward 
the dues promptly and insure the $1,000 before this meeting. Since 
this letter was issued fourteen chapters have forwarded their dues, and 
thanks partly to these dues and partly to other help the $1,000 is today 
in the hands of the Treasurer. 

The association is now in better active condition than ever before. 
The Treasurer's report will show that there are now eighteen chapters, 
actually alive, which have complied with the Constitution's provisions 
for membership. These eighteen chapters have 359 paid-up members. 

Ten chapters when this report was prepared expected to be repre- 
sented at this meeting. 

We have by no means done all that we could. There is a very fertile 
field full of much work ahead. If, however, the association can go 
forward and grow as much in the next two years as it has done in the 
last two years, we can well rejoice, and in the present we have every 
reason to take courage . 

This completes the statement of the Council. The Council is, how- 
ever, by the Constitution further directed to see to the selection of nomi- 
nees for the vacancies in the offices of the association, and to prepare 
any recommendations or other business for this meeting. 

With the consent of the meeting, the Council would prefer to bring 
up these mattters one at a time. 

The meeting consenting, the Council would next ask to have the 
report of the traveling secretaries presented, and discussion of it de- 
ferred until a little later. 

Miss Eoot here presented her report, combining with it that of Miss 
Buxton, who was absent: 



The St. Maky's Muse. 197 



Report of the Traveling Secretaries. 

LMiss Anna Buxton and I having been appointed traveling secretaries 

r the St. Mary's Alumnse, assumed our duties on October 21st. 

The total expenses of the trips was $78.36 — $49.41 being expended 

• Miss Buxton and $28.95 by myself. 

Miss Buxton and I were away for three weeks, she spending each day 

a different place in the west and I in the east, and by our united 

orj"s twenty-eight chapters were organized or reorganized. The names 

d presiding officers of these chapters are as follows : 

Durham — Mrs. John Manning. 
Chapel Hill— Mrs. J. S. Holmes. 
Hillsboro — Miss Rebecca Hill.* 
Lexington — Mrs. C. A. Hunt. 
Salisbury — Mrs. Chas. Bell. 
Concord — Mrs. Leonard Brown. 
Hickory — Mrs. O. M. Royster. 
Morganton — Promised to organize later. 
Asheville — Mrs. C. C. Mitchell. 
Charlotte — Mrs. Yorke. 
Columbia — Mrs. D. D. Taber. 
Henderson — Miss Olivia Lamb. 
Wilson — Miss Georgia Hales. 
Goldsboro — Miss Mildred Borden. 
Kinston — Miss Alice Hines, Secretary. 
New Bern — Mrs. Hugh Lovick. 
Beaufort — Mrs. Thos. Thomas. 
! Washington — Miss Katie Blount Bragaw. 
Edenton — Miss Sophie Wood. 
Hertford — Miss Pennie Norcomb. 
Elizabeth City — Miss Rebecca Albertson. 
Norfolk — Mrs. Dorsey Pender. 
Portsmouth — Miss Catharine Bruce. 
Scotland Neck — Mrs. Eleanor Smith. 
Tarboro — Miss Rena Clark. 
Rocky Mount — Mrs. Frank Spruill. 
Enfield — Mrs. Spooner Harrison. 
Wilmington — Miss Sue Prince. 
Fayetteville — Miss Kate Broadfoot. 

[ cannot finish my report without a word of heartfelt appreciation 
the cordial hospitality that was extended me throughout my- entire 

, 'Deceased. 



198 The St. Mart's Muse. 



* 



trip. It converted what had been assumed as a duty into what will 
a long-remembered pleasure. Annie Gales Root, 

Field Secretary, East\\ 

The council then asked for the report of the Treasurer, which is 
follows : 

The Annual Report of the Treasurer of the St. Mary's Alumna Associati 
From May 31, 1912, to May 26, 1913. 
receipts. 

Balance In bank May 31, 1912 $l,92 r 

Balance, expense account 

Pledges paid since May 31 6?f 

Collected by Miss McVea 322f k 

Dues, m mbers of general association. 

Scholar J p Fund — Raleigh Chapter, "Piper," and balance in treasury.. 312 

Schol"-" p Fund — New York Chapter lii 

Scholti xi p Fund — Hi lerson ^uapter 4 

Schote ~> Fund — Tarboro Chapter 5 

Schola ?und — Mc^anton c;napter 

Scholars &i{ Fund — Rocky Mount Chapter 5 

Scholarship Fund — Class of 1903, Miss Winslow, treasurer 62; 

Scholarship Fund — Owen Loan with interest 59 

Scholarship Fund— $1,000 fund 71 

Dues from Chapters: 

Raleigh $76.50 

New York 8.50 

Asheville 10.00 

Chapel Hill 5.50 

Henderson 18.00 

Wilson 6.00 

Morganton 3.00 

Salisbury 7.00 

Columbia 14.00 

Baltimore 10.00 

Wilmington 8.00 

Tarboro 5.00 

Scotland Neck 7.00 

Rocky Mount 5.00 

Elizabeth City 8.00 

Edenton 6.00 



If 



Hi 



Total dues from 16 chapters of approximately 348 members 174 

Interest on two 6% bonds, March 1st 60 

Accrued interest on deposit 43 



Total receipts to date ($1,333.97 added since May 31, 1912) $3,165 



•i 



'.:' 



The St. Mary's Muse. 199 



EXPENDITURES. 

„sh for stamps and telegrams $3.02 

mds with interest one month 2,010.00 

:penses, field secretaries 78.36 

owers, Mrs. Winston 5.00 

terest on bonds paid to beneficiaries 60.00 

sh balance expense account 1.49 

sh to be deposited 3.00 

.lance in bank this date 1,004.16 



Total $3,165.03 

RESOURCES. 

fo 6% bonds $2,000.00 

; nk deposit 1,004.16 

sh today , t> . 19.00 



Total resources , J3.023.16 

Marga <• J. CRUIKSH^.j, 

7 urer. 

ilThe Council next asked for the report of the JNominatin to _ mmittee 
^pointed by it. Continuing the report of the Council, Mrs. Strong 
id: 

According to the Constitution there must annually be elected a Presi- 
nt, a Vice-President, a Secretary, a Treasurer, and two members of 
1 Council, and only the Secretary and the Treasurer are eligible to re- 
action. 

;The officers the past year have been: Mrs. R. W. Winston, Presi- 
mt ; Mrs. Frank Wood, Vice-President ; Miss McKimmon, Secretary ; 
rs. Ernest Cruikshank, Treasurer. The retiring members of the 
imncil are: Miss Annie Root and Mrs. R. C. Strong. The Council 
ambers continuing to serve a,re Miss Sarah Cheshire, Mrs. Wm. E. 
iiipp, Mrs. Wm. E. Lindsey, and Mrs. Herbert Jackson. 
'The nominating Committee are therefore to report nominees for 
•esident, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, and two members of 
3 Council to serve three years. It is of course understood that in 
dition to the nominees proposed by the committee any member of the 
sociation present can propose any other nominee for the several offices. 
Pi Mrs. V. E. Turner, chairman of the Nominating Committee, pre- 
ited the following names : 



200 The St. Mary's Muse. 

For President — Miss Anna Nash Buxton. 
For Vice-President — Mrs. F. H. Busbee. 
For Secretary — Miss Kate McKimmon. 
For Treasurer — Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank. 

For Members of Council — Mrs. Cbas. Baskerville, of New York, and Mr 
D. Elias, of Raleigh. 



The above names were voted upon separately and all were unan^ s 
mously elected. 

Miss Buxton havine; been elected President, the Council now offere 
the following resolutions, which were discussed and adopted: 

(1) Resolved, by the association in annual meeting, that instead of the a] I 
pointment of field secretaries, the President be requested to arrange to visit thi 
chapters of the association at her and their convenience, but next fall, if possibh 
and to do such other work as she can toward forming other chapters, and tha 
the association authorizes the payment of all expenses from its current funds 

(2) Resolved, That the association as its special work for next year takes u 
the extension of its membership both in chapters and among the scattere 
alumnae, and that as it has raised $1,000 this year, so it decides to raise its pai 
membership to one thousand next year, and that the delegates and other alumnt 
present be requested to push this matter from this date as far as they can, bot 
personally and in their chapters, so that the one thousand mark can be reachec 
if possible, by Founders' Day, November 1st next. ID(1 



t: 



rj. 



Concerning the second resolution, Mrs. Strong said, for the Council 
The Council proposes this resolution bearing in mind two tilings 
(1) That the association should have very definite work from year t 
year; (2) that paid-up members breed enthusiasm. Put membership 
first and the money will follow. One thousand members incidentall 
means $500 in association dues; the other $500 will almost necessarib 
follow from special offerings and special work. Work for one thousanc 
members and next May, at this meeting we shall be able to report botl; 
one thousand members and $1,000 more for the Scholarship Fund 
The two belong together; the Scholarship Fund is now $3,000 short o 
completion. Increase our membership and enthusiasm and in tw< 
years it will be complete. 

(3) In connection with the report of the Treasurer, the Counci 
offers the following resolution : 



Resolved, That the Council be directed to have the Treasurer invest the $1,000 
now in hand in $1,000 more of St. Mary's bonds, and apply the interest as here 
tofore directed. 



? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 201 



Next followed informal reports from the delegates from distant 

apters. 

(Mrs. Cobb said for Cbapel Hill: 

'It is a great pleasure to me to represent the Chapel Hill Chapter of the St. 

LL try's Alumnae. The chapter is yet young, having been organized in November 
1910. It has eleven members and holds a yearly business meeting, which is 
lowed by the social hour. Our President is Mrs. Emilie Rose Smedes Holmes, 
I our Secretary and Treasurer Miss Annie McGehee. Last October Miss Bux- 
l met with us, and her enthusiasm in the matter of the Scholarship Fund made 
anxious to add our contribution. We called to our assistance Miss Dumais 

a *'l Dr. R. Blinn Owen, who came just after Easter and gave us a most delight- 
treat in the way of a song recital. The proceeds of that evening, $27.10, T, 
:e pleasure in adding to the Scholarship Fund." 

Miss Erwin reported for Durham a flourishing chapter there, and 

•ned over $12 to the Treasurer. 

.Miss Harrison said that in Enfield alumnae affairs were somewhat at 

ftandstill, but she hoped that in the fall interest could be revived. 

Miss Dortch, acting for Miss Lamb, reported that there are now in 

nderson 42 of St. Mary's alumnae, 36 of whom are active members. 

e Henderson chapter is, next to Raleigh, the most flourishing chapter. 

ss Shuford reported only five active members for Hickory. Miss 

ties reported 12 members for Wilson, and Mrs. Herring 14 for Scot- 

d Neck. The Scotland Neck Chapter is a strong one, the President, 

•s. Smith, a St. Mary's girl of the 40's. 

The New York Chapter appointed Mrs, William Martin as their 

uresentative, but she was unable to attend. The chapter reports 17 

ive members, and besides dues of $8.50, paid in $18 to the Scholar- 

p Fund. 

iMl other chapters which are not mentioned here, and which have 

n heard from this year, and hence are considered active chapters, 

■■ in the list given in the Treasurer's report. 

Mrs. Ashe next presented the report of the Raleigh Chapter, showing 

ecord of a splendid year's work, $400 having been paid in to the 

iasurer since last May. This chapter of about 160 active members 

growing steadily and sets a fine standard for the other chapters. 

Vt the conclusion of these reports, the members of the Class of 1913 



j" 



202 The St. Maey's Muse. 

were welcomed to the alumnae body by Mrs. Ward, of Raleigh. Mr 
Ward said : 

"The members of St. Mary's Alumnae, like most other people, are always read 1 
for something new. So, it is with keen interest and pleasure that we look upo 
you, the fair Class of 1913, and give you a glad and cordial greeting as ne 
alumnae. We heartily welcome you to our ranks and hope that you may fe< 
that you are one with us, in thought, in word, and in works. May you frequent! 
meet with us and inspire us with that new enthusiasm which comes from contaf 
with the young and joyful. Let each one of you fully realize your own ind 
vidual importance so that you may do your part, and help us to do ours — agtjt 
working faithfully together for the completion of our undertakings. You musn 
be afraid of us, either. For ordinarily the school girl's notion of the alumnae 
an austere, formidable band of women, with wisdom stupendous and dignity tr 
mendous — running over with 'goody-good advice' and harping on the exceedin 
wrongfulness of everything that one enjoys. Now we want you to thoroughl .;, 
enjoy meeting with us. We want your cooperation, the inspiration of yov 
presence. We want you to suggest new ideas, instill in us new enthusiasm, an' 
give us new life. In the future may you often be here to welcome the classe 
of succeeding years, when, our numbers increased to the hundreds, our voic 
may sound in one mighty chorus of gratitude and praise for St. Mary's, ov 
glorious Alma Mater. Again I say, Welcome." 



Garden Party. 



At the close of the alurnnse meeting, the Senior Class and the visitiu 
alumnse were delightfully entertained by a garden party, given on w 
lawn near Bishop Cheshire's by the Ealeigh Chapter of the alumns 
The occasion was thoroughly enjoyed by all, and will long be rem en 
bered by those persent. 

Acknowledgments. 

In the report of the Treasurer appears the item of $62.55 from tjjfc 
Class of 1903. The alumnse wish particularly to thank this class, afi| 
Miss Mae Wood Minslow, the president, especially, for this generoi 
contribution at a time when it seemed impossible that the $1,000 the 
were struggling to raise, could be attained. 

The alumnse also wish to register here a vote of thanks to Judge In 
W. Winston, of Raleigh, who generously offered to complete the sum, i 1 
the $1,000 was not raised. Happily the sum was realized without nee^ 
to call on Judge Winston, but his offer is most gratefully appreciate* [ 

The Treasurer wishes to report that at this date, May 31st, addition* 



I'- 



ll 



iro] 



te 



if 



•P 



( 



>■ 



The St. Mart's Muse. 203 



fciiims have been received, so that the amount in bank stands at present 
,092.36, which will be invested at once as directed by the Council and 
opted by the association, that is, another $1,000 6 per cent bond. 

Alumnae Personals 

5 Eleanor and Bell Davis (1910-'ll) and Fannie Cooper (1911-'13) 
Henderson are with Miss Fenner in Europe this summer. 
Among former St. Mary's girls graduating this year from other 
stitutions was Esther Rembert (1908-'10) of Charleston, from Win- 
rop College. 

tn Maude Bunn (1909-'ll) of Rocky Mount, whose sister Katherine 

ft'as at St. Mary's the past year, is taking a prominent place in the 
udent life at the State Normal College, where she is President of 
e Y. W. C. A. for the coming year. 

isL Nellie Hendricks, '12, of Marshall, N. C, who shortly after her 

ic IJ >aduation accompanied her school friend, Mary Owen, to her home 
Gautemala for a long visit, has reached home again after a delightful 
fp. We shall try to get her to tell us about the trip for the Muse. 
Among the large North Carolina contingent at the Summer Session 

I Columbia University this summer, are a number of St, Mary's girls, 

^jaong others, Margaret Stedman, '04, of Raleigh, Nannie E. Smith, 
H, of Scotland Neck, both now of the Raleigh Public Schools, Frances 
ottum, '12, of Linville, now of the St. Mary's faculty, and Myrtle 
isosway, of New Bern. 

Patsey Smith, '12, and Anna Strong, '12, of Raleigh, who spent 

e past session at Columbia University, are again at home after a very 

Hisfactory year. It is understood that Miss Smith made a great hit 

ji ] several ways. Miss Strong will return next session to complete her 
urse in Kindergarten. 

t|> Eva Rogerson, '09, and Ida Rogerson, '10, of Edenton, Mary Shu- 

rd, '10, of Hickory, and Sallie Haywood Battle, '09, of Rocky Mount, 

fe members of a house party at Nag's Head. On their return trip 

rly in August they will visit Minnie Leary, '09, at her home in Eliza- 

\ \ th City, and then stop for a while in Edenton, with the Misses Roger- 

hm. 

lit 



204 The St. Maey's Muse. 

Bettie Woolf, '07, of Demopolis, Ala., after teaching in Dothau 
Ala., for several years, the last year as Supervisor, has had to give u] 
teaching the coming session to be with her father at home. Her mo the 
died after a long illness last March. 

St. Mary's is glad to welcome Ha Rountree, '10 (Mrs. Dr. C. L 
Pridgin), who with Dr. Pridgin became residents of Raleigh in July 
Dr. Pridgin has been for several years connected with the work of th 
North Carolina Hookworm Commission and Mrs. Pridgin has been i. 
valuable assistant in his work. He is now called to Raleigh to tak< 
charge of the work as State Secretary in succession to Dr. Ferrall, wh( 
has been promoted to be National Secretary. Dr. and Mrs. Pridgii 
have taken the house formerly occupied by Dr. Ferrall at 536 Nortt 
Blount street. 

Mrs. R. W. Slade (Sue Hunter, ' — ), of Columbia, Ga., accom- 
panied by her younger daughter was a welcome caller at St. Mary's ir 
July. She reported her daughter, Penelope Slade (1907-'09) well anc 
happy as always. 

Another very brief caller was Mrs. L. H. Love of Monterey, Cal. 
(Anna Parsley, '01, of Wilmington). Dr. and Mrs. Love were tour 
ing the country. 



The St. Maky's Muse. 205 



Alumnae Weddings 



Green-Cohen 

Mr. and Mrs. Adolph A. Cohen 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Beatrice Bollman 

to 

Mr. Harry Green 

on Wednesday evening, the fourth of June 

at half after nine o'clock 

Central Hotel 
Florence, South Carolina 



McBride— Liddell 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Scott Liddell 

request the pleasure of your company at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Helen Katharine 

to 

Mr. Dexter Ballou McBride 

on the evening of Wednesday the eleventh of June 

at half after eight o'clock 

600 East Avenue 
Charlotte. North Carolina 



Carrison— HicKson 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hickson 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Phyllis Dudley 

to 

Mr. Henry G. Carrison, Jr. 

on Wednesday evening the eighteenth of June 

at eight o'clock 

Saint David's Episcopal Church 

Cheraw, South Carolina 



206 The St. Maey's Muse. 

Bernard— Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Jones 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Sara Haigh 

to 

Mr. Silas Garrett Bernard 

on Wednesday evening the fourth of June 

at half after eight o'clock 

at Trinity Church 
Asheville, North Carolina 



Glenn— Hardie 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hardie 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Katherine Margaret Macfarlan 

to 

Mr. Robert W. Glenn 

on the evening of Wednesday the eleventh of June 

nineteen hundred and thirteen 

at half after eight o'clock 

Holy Trinity Church 
Greensboro, North Carolina 



- 



KEADl-MARKJ-ACT! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
eaders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
irinciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
o advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
iheir loss, not ours. 



lUIeigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Readyto-Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls 



BPfje jf agfjton 



Fayetteville 
Street 



French 
Hat Shop 



Exclusive 
Millinery 



Annie, aged seven, at her Mother's knee, Said "Please Mother, oh please tell 
me: Do doggies pereh in dogwood trees? Do mock turtles talk in mockery? 
Do mockoranges grow on mockorange trees? Do mockingbirds sing in mock- 
ery? And what on earth can moccasins be? Is mock heroic a hero bold? What 
ihas a mock sun to do with the sun so old? Can you mock an awful moccasin 
snake? And can a mocker mockingly take, The hollow mockery and fill it up 
.With mock turtle soup out of a cup?" The wise mother to Annie replied: 
"Your questions, child, can't be satisfied, For to do so would make a mock out 
iof me, And this I greatly refuse to be." 



ETHE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 

Dry Goods 

OK ALL KINDS 
MILLINERY 

»:■>:»€ €: « 

Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' FINE SHOES AJffi SLIPPERS 



" It's worth the difference" 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



Advertisements. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Established 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 

COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 

WE SELL, GOSSARD'S LACE 

FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



if 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

CANDY — CHINA — TOTS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

The 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



J. SCHWARTZ 

RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Snoes 



! 

Advertisements. 


College GIRL Supplies 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 

ihe OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 


CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

f 174 
Both Phones :< 2 26 


- OLLEGE STUDENTS! Your Wants Are Given Careful Study and Special 
Attention. The McKIMMON COMPANY LEADS in the Showing of 

oat Suits, School Dresses, Evening: Costumes, "Waists, Coats, and Accessory Lines 
Silks, Dress Goods, Trimmings, Gloves, Hosiery, Laces, Motions, Etc. 

IcKIMMON DRY GOODS CO. Fayetteville St. 


C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds oi Keys Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 


i\ 


KING'S GROCERY 
"The Little Store" 


YOUNG & HUGBES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
S. Wilmington Street 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 


RIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 


RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

ii 


Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 

3 



Advertisements. 



HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 



Good Things Always at 



BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



SHOES! WHOSE? 
POOL & CROCKER'S 



124 Fayetteville Street 



Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 
Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
1 1 8 E. Davie Street Raleigh N. C. 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



F.t 



we 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital.]!! 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 



G. H. DORTCH, 

Secretary. 



R. S. BUSBEE, 
General Manager. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND SHOES 

210 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C 



.ROSENTHAL 
5 GO. 

GROCERS 

WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 

EDWARDS S BROUGHTON PRINTING 

Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

loses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

'lora! Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants 

Raleigh, N. C" Phone 113 



etn. 



T. W. BLAKE 

JCH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Stp., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. Jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new Jewelry and reparlng 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 
I Picture Frames and Window Shades 



PERRY'S \RT STORK 
S. Wilmington Street 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAYING BANK 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOI* 

ftll Our Work Done by The Goodyear Welt System 

104 E. H»rgrett street 



Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury Street 



(THE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A & M. 
Athletic Association. $1-60 per year. Walter 
C. Ta yl or, B us. Mgr., West Raleigh, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD~ 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 



TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishings 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 

Personal attention to mail orders. Bell Phone 438 



BOYLAN-PEARCE CO. 

RALEIGH'S GREATEST DRY GOOD STORE 

Come and See Us in Our New Home 

Everything: fo Woman's Wear. Reaily-to-Wear Garments of all Kinds 

5 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
The "Wake Drug- Store. Phones 228 



HICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE 
Prompt Delivery 



Phones 107 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS 
MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 

BRIDGERS TAILORING CO, for Dry Cleaning, Alter- 
ing, and Pressing done at small cost. 
226 Fayetteville Street 



DARNELL & THOMAS 



MUSIC HOUSE 



WOMAN'S EXCHANGE 
115 S. Harrington Street Phone 941 M 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

WEATHERS ART STORE 
Art Store, Art Materials and. Art Novelties 
117 Fayetteville St., Raleigh, N. C. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS&HONS, Raleigh, N. 0.— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 



J. R. FERRALL & CO.— GROCERIES 

BEST OF EVERYTHING IN OUR LINE 
222 Fayetteville St., RALEIGH, N. C. 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

hone 123 COR. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON. KTNSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
ANJD WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



W. W. CROXTON, 

Traffic Manager, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. TJPCHTJRCH, 

General Agent, RALEIGH. N. C> 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 



71st ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 19, 1912. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 23, 1913. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. 

St. Mary's \ %• THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these \ $• THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: j ^ TRE ART SCHOOL. 

{ 5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector 



©petting ^timber 



October, 1913 







ftaleigf), 31. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



OPENING NUMBER. 



'ol. XVIO^ October, 1913. No. 1 



God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this School 
ath thy love and favor; enlighten our minds more and more with the light of 
he everlasting Gospel; graft in our hearts a love of the truth; increase in us 
rue religion; nourish us with all goodness; and of Thy great mercy keep us in 
he same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the Son, together, we 
worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



St. Mary's Hymn 



Music by R. Blinn Owen. 



Come one and all, your voices lend, 

In radiant tones our hymn we raise 
To Alma Mater's glory, spend 

Our every effort for her praise. 
With glowing hearts we view these walls, 

To them our girlhood mem'ries cling; 
You campus green and well-loved halls, 

To you our grateful hymn we sing. 

Hail, hail, constant, true 
Gleams thy light serene! 

We, thy loving daughters, 
Hail St. Mary's queen! 

Dear Alma Mater, praise we bring 

For friendships nurtured at your side; 
No dearer, sweeter ties will cling 

To any hearts than here abide. 
Inspired by you our thoughts enfold 

A larger aim. In all you've seemed 
To guide our steps, our lives to mold 

To nobler things we had not dreamed. 

Hail, hail, constant, true 
Gleams thy light serene! 

We, thy loving daughters, 
Hail St. Mary's queen! 



The St. Maky's Muse. 



The Seventy-Second Opening 



On Thursday, September 18, the seventy-second session of St. Mary's 
school began. The opening service was held in the Chapel at 9 :0C 
o'clock. After Morning Prayer, in a simple address Bishop Cheshire 
welcomed the faculty and students to St. Mary's. His words led ua 
all to resolve to put forth our best effort in making the new year a most 
successful and pleasant one. 

Before the formal opening, however, preparations for the coming fl 
session had been going on. The new teachers came on Saturday, the 
12th, and the old teachers with a number of new girls came on Monday. 
All had arrived by Wednesday night. Busily and merrily the work of 
getting "registered" and "classified" went on, while "tests" and ex- 
aminations claimed their usual share of attention. 

Everywhere new students might be seen wondering about arm in arm 
exploring their new surroundings or shyly making friends with other 
new girls whom they might meet, lost in some puzzling covered way, or 
old girls in search of "improvements." 

Every year sees many changes and improvements, such as the new 
cement floors in the covered ways, the beginning of the covered way 
through the Art Building to the Auditorium, the new rooms on the 
third floor of East Wing or the light on the porch of Main Building, 
the gift of the class of 1913. 

Immediately after the opening service the regular work of the school 
began, classes met and were organized, each student being assigned 
work for the following day. In the evening, after dinner, everyone 
assembled in the schoolroom and the first day of school ended with a 
very brief but interesting and most helpful "Thursday evening talk" 
from the Rector. 

Many of our old friends we shall miss greatly during the new year, 
but we wish them success wherever they are, and we extend a warm 
greeting to the new comers and a hearty welcome back to our old 

friends. 

I 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Opening Reception 



The first social event of the year was a delightful reception held on 
Saturday night, the 20th of September. It was given in honor of the 
ew girls by the Senior class, in the name of the old girls. Attractive 
ards for "progressive conversation" were filled out previous to the 
Occasion by the old girls who acted as escorts to the new girls. At 8 :30 
he guests began to arrive in the parlor. On entering they were warmly 
welcomed by the Senior class, and then passed on from group to group. 
ill during the evening a spirit of fun and good time prevailed. Punch 
ma served in the Muse room and adjoining corridors, in which attrac- 
ive arrangements had been made for the occasion. On leaving the 
Muse room the guests were requested to register their names in a book 
yhich is kept from year to year. 

I 



How I Spent My Summer 



B. BUEDINE. 



I left St. Mary's May 27th for Salisbury, K C, to visit Alice 
und Elizabeth McKenzie and I had the most wonderful time in 
he world — dancing and going to parties. I was there two weeks when 
. got a telegram from mother saying she was going to pass through the 
aext day on her way to New York City, and for me to be ready to go 
vith her, which of course I did. 

We arrived in New York City June 15th and stayed there for a week 
,md saw some of the most wonderful plays imaginable — "Peg O' My 
ETeart," being the best. 

We left New York City for Saratoga Springs and after six weeks 
nost enjoyably spent in dancing, playing tennis and such games, we 
eft for Narragansett Pier to visit Dorothy Budge. She has the most 
idorable little summer home, just a short distance from Narragansett 
Bay, and we used to go down almost every morning and go in swim- 
ning. It was very interesting to sit on the beach and watch the women 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



wander up and down, in the very latest and most extreme styles, such as j 
we see worn by the fashionable women in Vogue. 

After leaving Narragansett Pier, we went back to New York Cityi 
and saw and did some very interesting things, such as going up in the 
arm of "The Statue of Liberty," and going to the Hippodrome. Sep-|i 
tember 16th I left New York City for dear old St. Mary's to resume 
my studies for the coming year. 



A Dining Car Episode 



1 



Melba McCullers. 



"Las' call for dinner! Third and last' call for dinner! Las' call, 
las' call for dinner." Through the half-empty Pullman the voice of 
the porter sounded strangely loud and clear. With a start Richard Lang- 
don roused himself and, pulling out his watch, discovered to his sur- 
prise that it was 2 :00 o'clock. One whole hour had passed ! And yet, 
he mused, it seemed as if it had been only a few minutes since he had 
last looked at his watch. Surely it had not been an hour! Oh, it 
couldn't have been that long ! Why, he had started to the dining car 
when the porter had first been around but — 

Yes, he confessed to himself with a dry grin, he had been day dream- 
ing ! How perfectly absurd that he, a sober, settled young bachelor on 
his way to New York City to attend to important business for his firm, 
even he, Richard Langdon, had just lost himself for a whole hour in as 
rapt day dreams as those which enthrall the soul of the most lovelorn 
school boy ! And, to increase his humiliation ten-fold, she, about whom 
these day-dreams had centered, was a total stranger to him. Yet on 
the pedestal of his fond imagination she had posed as a goddess of won- 
drous beauty and perfection. The thought was humiliating, nay mad- 
dening. He must put an end to such dreams as these, they were quite 
out of place. For he was no chivalrous knight of the sixteenth century, 
ready and eager to undertake any quest for the sake of the fair un- 
known. Nor yet was he the hero of a Chambers novel to whom life was 



i 



i 



} 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



idore or less a "dream of fair women." His age was the twentieth 
entury, nor the adventurous, romantic century that is often pictured, 
{hit a dull and very prosaic age indeed. As for himself he was merely 
}ln ordinary, matter-of-fact business man, in whose make-up such in- 
.nitely foolish things as day dreams had not the remotest place. 
i Whereupon Mr. Langdon, brought back to earth by such sane re- 
jections, bethought himself of his dinner. A juicy steak with French 
ried potatoes would do much he knew to brighten the dismal color of 
ds thoughts. Therefore he sought the dining car and was soon en- 
rossed in the menu. But the waiter was slow, so Langdon, to pass 
he time, turned to the scenery for amusement. But the scenery was 
leither especially amusing nor especially elevating for one in such a 
ramor as his. So, as a last resort, he sought the people. He looked 
hem over one by one. There was no one who could in the least divert 
ds thoughts. He picked up the menu in disgust and for the third time 
ivent down the list of "oysters — fish — soups — " etc. When — "Beg 
>ardon, suh, but the lady across the aisle says you will pay her bill," 
:ame the voice of the waiter. 

"Eh ? What ?" gasped Langdon in surprise, "er-er-what did you 
lay?" 

"I said, suh, that the lady across the aisle, the second table, suh, says 
hat you will pay her bill. It's two dollars and a quarter, suh." 

Langdon turned in amazement to see who this presumptuous and un- 
ceremonious lady might be. At the second table across the aisle sat a 
Krl, she was scarcely out of her teens, whom Langdon had not noticed 
vhen he entered. To say that when he looked at her now Langdon was 
surprised, astonished and dumbfounded would be expressing his feel- 
ngs far too mildly indeed. He felt as if the very heavens had fallen. 
is if the bottom had dropped completely out of his existence, while all 
lis high ideals had crashed, crumbling, about his ears. And, in truth, 
low could he have felt otherwise ? For the lady across the aisle was — 
be lady of his dreams ! 

She was not beautiful, this dreamed of lady, not even pretty, but 
ihe possessed charm in addition to the air of good breeding which had 
irst attracted Langdon's attention. Her clear grey eyes looked out on 



The St. Maey's Muse. 



i 



the world with an expression of truth and sincerity that not even her I 1 
calm, self-possessed manner could belie. It was for her charm, her | 
grace and above all for her air of refinement that Langdon admired her 
and now — . '"The bill is two and a quarter, suh," repeated the waiter ¥ 
patiently. 

"Er-er-well-all right" mechanically Langdon paid it though he was 
hardly couscious of doing so, his mind was in such a turmoil. 

Nor could he gain his self-control even after he returned to the ^ 
Pullman. His mind was still full of the greatest catastrophe he had 
ever known — and a catastrophe it was indeed in spite of her warm 
thanks and her eager explanation. For when they returned to the 
Pullman she had explained and, incredible as her story was, Langdon 
found it hard not to believe it with such frankness and sincerity was it 
told. She had left the home of a friend early that morning, she said, 
on her way to her own home in New York City and in the excitement 
of getting off she had left the purse with all her money, having with 
her only an empty black bag. She had not discovered her mistake, she 
explained, until she started to pay for her dinner. Imagine then her M 
predicament ! What was she to do ? After serious reflection she at 
last decided on the plan she had adopted, as being the surest way out 
of her difficulty. Of all the crowd she had chosen him because he seemed 
to be the most gentlemanly and courteous. But even if his courtesy 
should not stand such a severe test, yet, she reasoned, he would pay her 
bill, if only out of curiosity or amazement. 

"How truly you judged me," he had explained. "I did pay the bill 
because I was too surprised to do otherwise." 

"Oh ! but I assure you," she hastened to explain, "it is only a loan. 
Of course, you understand that. I will send you a check as soon as I 
arrive home." Then with a few more hastily murmured thanks and 
without even telling him her name, she was gone. 

******* 

Two weeks later, Richard Langdon sat at the desk at his club open- 
ing his evening mail. Two weeks of hard work had passed, two weeks 
in which he had striven by means of his work to forget the episode in 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 

jibe dining-car. Yes, he thought sadly, and determined grimly, an 
episode it shall always remain. 

i An hour passed. A friend entered and hailed Langdon. "Hello, old 
pap, what's up ? Or rather what's the matter ? You look as if you 
tad been seeing visions, or better, though not so romantic, as if some 
me had suddenly died and left you a fortune. Say, is that paper in 
r our hand, that you can't take your eyes off of, a check for a thousand ? 
ifou look as if it might be." 

| "ISTo," Langdon laughed out of the pure happiness of his soul, "it is 
fLot a check for a thousand and it is only a check for two dollars and a 
.|uarter, but look at the name on the back, if you please — Marian Hoff- 
man. Yes, you can well stare at that when she's New York's most 
popular debutante and greatest heiress. But the check is nothing com- 
pared to this," and he picked up a dainty blue envelope. 
j "This," he said solemnly, "is an invitation to call and I'd rather 
ifiave it than the thousand you speak of because — oh, well, because it 
5 neans — may mean — I should say the happier reopening of an episode 
^vhich I thought closed forever." 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



Sept. 27— The Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception 

The annual reception of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society was 
held in the Muse room on Saturday night, September the twenty- 
seventh. The color scheme of the Muse room is green, so it was an easy 
matter to successfully carry out the society colors of olive and gold by 
banking masses of golden-rod upon the tables and desk, and around the 
punch bowls. The society pennants were hung in the hall which was 
attractively fixed up with a punch bowl, sofas and rugs. Punch was 
served in the Muse room by Pencie Warren and Nellie Wood, and in 
the hall Helen Wright and Katharine Ward served the guests after 
they had passed down the receiving line composed of the officers of the 
society. A delightful salad course was followed by ices and cakes and 
the souvenir, a tiny Japanese fan. The last of the guests left at the 
ringing of the nine-thirty bell, all the new girls delighted over the idea 
of being members of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society. 

Sept. 29— Miss Abbott's Recital 

On Monday evening, September 29th, Miss Abbott gave a most de- 
lightful violin recital in the Auditorium. Miss Abbott was assisted by 
Miss Shull and Mr. Owen accompanied her. An extract from the 
Neivs and Observer and the program are given : 

The first of the season's series of faculty recitals was given in the Auditorium 
at St. Mary's last evening by Miss Muriel Abbott, violinist, assisted by Miss 
Zona Shull, lyric soprano. 

Miss Abbott, who is a violinist of rare ability, was a pupil for three years of 
Sevcik in Prague and a diploma student of the Conservatory of Music, Geneva, 
Switzerland. She played with a great brilliancy of tone and brought to her 
audience the clear interpretation of each number. Her versatility of expression 
was well tested in the first two numbers by the noble dignified precision and full 
tone in Handel, A Major Sonata, and the smooth legato, pure sustained tone 
ia the Gluck-Wilhelmj's Melodie. The magnificent Praeludium and Allegro of 
Pugnani-Kreisler with its complicated bowing, was rendered with faultless 
technique, which brought enthusiastic applause. Her last number in direct con- 
trast to those preceding, abounded in dainty, capricious movements reaching 
their climax in Rigandon, a French dance, full of vim and inspiring rhythm. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

l Miss Shull, who is well known in Raleigh, was greeted with warm applause, 
he is possessed of a soprano voice of rare purity and sweetness, which she 
sed at a splendid advantage in her rendition of the Recitative and Aria from 
La Tranata." 

The artists were ahly assisted by Mr. Blinn Owen at the piano as accom- 
anist. 

Sonata A Major Handel 

For Piano and Violin 
Andante 
Allegro 
Adagio-Allegro 

Melodie Gluck-Wilhelmj 

Praeludium und Allegro Pugnani-Kreisler 

. Recitative and Aria from "La Traviata" Verdi 

, Caprice Viennois Kreisler 

i Lies Farfadets Pente 

Rigaudon Monsigny 

Oct. 4— Alpha Rho Reception 

I On Saturday night, October 4th, the Alpha Rho's delightfully enter- 
ained the new members of the society, together with the officers of Sigma 
..ambda and E A n and the members of the faculty. The Muse room 
nd hall were artistically decorted in autumn leaves and scarlet sage, 
yhich to a certain extent carried out the colors of the society, scarlet 
nd gray. In the reception hall was a large punch bowl decorated with 
ern and evergreen, which was presided over by Edith and Edna Mann. 
i.n the Muse room was the receiving line, composed of the officers and 
laculty-adviser of the society. Here also was a second punch bowl 
wesided over by Kate Meggs and Anna Hodgson. Soon after the ar- 
rival of the guests, a salad course was served, followed by grape-juice, 
ce and cake; souvenirs of topsy-turvys and wonder fans were given, 
^fter an hour of joys which "delight a school girl's heart," they in her 
iwn way, saying, "I've had such a good time." 

Oct. 6 

After the Muse meeting on the night of October the sixth, Mr. and 
Ers. Cruikshank delightfully entertained in their sitting-room. Be- 
ides the members of the Muse Club, Miss Thomas, Miss Sutton and 
i^Tiss Bottum were also there. We spent a pleasant hour sitting around 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



in groups gossiping, talking and having a real cozy time. Iced-chocolate 
and delicious sandwiches were served. We, one and all, hated to leave 
when the lights flashing told us that it was time we were in our rooms. 

Oct. 9— Circus Day 

Circus day ! it comes around but once a year and although it was 
pouring down rain when we woke up Thursday morning, we didn't 
care a bit. 

Classes were stopped at twelve-thirty. Then we rushed to our rooms, 
hustled into rain coats and calmly ( ?) went in to lunch. Special cars 
were waiting for us and goodness, what a mad hurry for tickets and 
seats. 

When we reached the circus grounds, it was raining harder than ever 
and never shall we forget that red clay we went through and the time 
we had trying to keep with our special friends. However we soon got 
settled and what fun we had stretching our necks and eyes trying to see 
everything at once. The trapeze-acting, the trained elephants, bare- 
back riding, and last but not least the clowns. Oh ! it was wonderful ! 
Of course, in the meantime, we ate popcorn, peanuts and crackajacks, 
and every now and then caught the eye of somebody we knew besides 
ourselves. 

It couldn't last forever, and, after taking a last look at the animals 
and buying balloons and candy for the ones who didn't go, we once more 
waded through the mud and came home, each one trying to tell what 
she liked best, and trying to show that she had more mud on her shoes 
than anybody else. 

Oct II 

One of the jolliest of the parties at Senior Hall was Miss McGavock's 
"At Home" to the Senior class. Miss McGavock delightfully enter- 
tained her guests with "spooky" tales during which sweets were passed 
around to remind us that we were still on this earth. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



ATHLETICS 



Julia Coopeb. 



"Uniting" has begun and with its advent we all of us unconsciously 
turn our eyes toward the basketball field, or if we are so inclined look 
out to see if the tennis courts are any good. Perhaps we play for the 
, first afternoon or so because walking around one little dizzy circle 
i bores us. But if you play basketball long enough you can't help getting 
I; fascinated and you play just for the fun you get out of it. We are up 
I here for work, but play comes in mighty well sometimes, and it is gen- 
i erally the girl that plays the hardest that, when the time comes to work, 
3 works the hardest. 

i Girls, come on out and let's make athletics count this year. Be a 
i real hard fighter and help your side to win. If you can't do one thing, 
' try your hand at another. If you don't star in tennis, start playing 
! basketball. If basketball is too tough for you, see if you can't beat the 
, rest at baseball. And if you don't happen to be cut out for athletics in 
i any of its forms, you can still be of very valuable use, for we need a few 
yellers and coachers to pat our star players on the back when they do 
I credit to themselves and their team. In fact we need you all, every one, 
s and you all can and must help. From the start it looks as if the Mus 
i and Sigmas were going to tackle each other pretty hard this year. Yes, 
! there is going to be a mighty close run for championship and you, indi- 
vidually, can help your side win. For the team in which all the girls 
work together, in which they all take their part and work their best, 
i with spirit and vim, is going to be the one that, in the end, is going to 
come off the field victor. 



14 


The St. Mary's Muse. 




SCHOOL NOTES 


Naomi Barnes' 


mother was with her during the first week of schoo] 



Melba McCullers has enjoyed two very pleasant visits from hej 
mother. 

Janie Hunt and Katharine Lassiter paid a short visit to the school 

Gene Smith went home on the 10th to be maid of honor at the mar 
riage of her sister. 

We regret to say that Helen Hartridge has left school and gone t< 
Washington. 

Josephine Smith and Dorothy Fairley were called home on accoun 
of illness in their homes. 

Mattie Moye Adams has had two very delightful visits from hei 
mother. 

Julia Allen and Sarah Borden have had visits from their families. 

Katharine Parker was at the school in early October, when she came 
to enter her sister, Adelaide. 

Annie Belle King had a visit from her father on the ninth. 

Rena Harding and Sallie Heyward have had visits from theii 
mothers. 

Eliza Skinner's father visited her on the sixth. 

Valerie Reese and Ellen Lay gave a surprise birthday party to Nellie 
Dodd on October the seventh. The chief feature of which was a cake 
adorned with fifteen candles. 

Martha and Helen Wright have had a visit from their parents. 

Anna Strong, Patsy Smith and Amy Winston have paid visits to the 
school. 

Dorothy Fairley had a short visit from her grandfather on the sixth. 
Mary Smith enjoyed a visit from her father on September 21th. 
Margaret Thomas' mother has been to see her. 

Ruth Douglass and Sarah Fenner, two of last year's girls, are at 
Peabody Institute. 



The St. Mart's Muse. 15 

Alice Latham's father visited her the early part of October. 
Olivia Lamb, Sadie Williams and Marie Thomas were here for the 
i opening, each here to enter a younger sister. 

Lorna Hales spent a day or two at school just before Fair week. 
Julia Rowe, who with Melba McCullers was one of the bridesmaids 
ii at Rosalie Wilkinson's wedding, spent several days at St. Mary's on 
her way home. 



StocKing-Luney 

Mr. Robert Errol Stocking 

and 

Miss Bertha Mary Luney 

announce their marriage 

on Wednesday the eleventh of June 

one thousand nine hundred and thirteen 

New York City 

This announcement will be of great interest to the many friends that 
Miss Luney made during her four years at St. Mary's. The wedding 
was a quiet one, at the church of the Transfiguration — the ceremony 
being performed by Mr. Lay. Mr. and Mrs. Stocking are making their 
home in New York City and the Muse takes this opportunity to offer 
sincerest good wishes. 



TKe St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year = = = = One Dollar 

Single Copies = a = -s = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except In July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumnse, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. ealeigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1913-1914. 

Laura Margaret Hoppe, Editor-in-Chief. 
Julia Allen. Nellie Wood. Margaret Bottum. 

Elizabeth Tarry. Bessie Badham. Melba McCullers. 

Mary Clark Smith. Josephine V. Smith. Julia Cooper. 

Sallie Hayward, Business Manager. 
Bessie Burdine, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



Witli this issue the St. Mary's Muse starts out on the tenth year of 
its career as a school paper. The present Board of Editors hope to make 
the Muse this year as good a publication as possible and will attempt to 
make it interesting to the alumnse, friends of the school and to the 
student-body. We propose to arouse school spirit, put forth exactly 
what we, as a school, stand for, and to make our magazine, not a 
literary effort, but a record of our lives passed here at St. Mary's. This 
aim can only be carried out by the cooperation of all, not only in a 
financial way, but in genuine help and enthusiasm. The Muse will be 
interesting to you if your are interested in the Muse. 



Last year there was such an increase in the number of boarding 
pupils — the largest enrollment we have ever had — that some of the girls 
were obliged to stay off the Grove. Of course this was very incon- 
venient, so during this past summer the top floor of both East and West 
Wing were made into four comfortable rooms and we are now able to 
accommodate everyone. 



The Muse wishes to extend a hearty welcome to the student-body and 
faculty. Though we miss many of the old familiar faces still there 
are many new to take their places and from the present outlook we will 
have the best and most successful of Years. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



Sfc. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

Honorary President - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Honorary Vir-r PRPstnFNTS . / Mra ' Kate de R - Me ares, Wilmington. 

HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS | ^ j M( , K p ittengeri Ra l el gh. 

President .... Miss Anna N. Buxton. 

Vice-President .... Mrs. F. H. Busbee, Raleigh. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon. St. Mary's. 

Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL 



The Annual Founder's Day meetings of the Chapters of the Alumnae 
Association mark the breaking up of the summer dullness in Alumnse 
affairs. Miss Buxton, the new President, has written to the different 
chapters urging the importance of holding these meetings as near 
Founders' Day (November 1st) as possible, and also to remind them of 
the work undertaken by the Association for the coming year. This 
work, it will be recalled, was to be especially a strong effort to increase 
the enrollment of members in the different chapters. No one can fail 
to see the importance of such an effort. Besides the strength of new 
enthusiasm and ideas given by added numbers, the treasury fund of 
the General Association grows nearer the slowly increasing sum needed 
to complete the two scholarships. 

It is greatly hoped that these meetings will be held, that a strong 
campaign for members will be undertaken in each Chapter and that re- 
ports of these meetings will be forwarded at once to the Muse. 



The Raleigh Chapter has sent out cards to announce its Founders' 
Day meeting for Monday, November 3d, at 4 o'clock, in the parlor at 
St. Mary's. The new chairman, Miss Ellen Dortch, will be in charge 
of the meeting and a large and enthusiastic attendance is expected. 



The delayed vacation Muse appears at the same time as the present 
issue. In it will be found a full account of the proceedings of the 



18 The St. Maky's Muse. 

Alumnae Association at the annual May meeting, including the repoi 
of the Alumnae Council, the new officers, and the Treasurer's reporl 
All officers of the different Chapters are particularly urged to read thi 
account at the Founders' Day meeting, if the Muse arrives in time, i 
not, pass a marked copy around among the non-subscribers in the Char- 
ter. 



The Treasurer was authorized at the May meeting to invest an addi 
tional $1,000 in 6 per cent St. Mary's bonds. This has been done, s< 
that the Association now owns $3,000 worth of these bonds, payin: 
6 per cent semi-annual dividends to its two beneficiaries. This leaves ;| 
very small balance in the bank — a little over $100 — at 4 per cent com 
pound interest. Much must be done this year if we are not to fall be 
hind the record of the last two years. 






Alumnae Notes 

Mr. Lay has recently returned from a visit to ]STew York, where hi 
spent several days during the General Convention. Later he spent tw( 
days in Greensboro attending one of the State Church Conventions. 

Mr. Cruikshank spent a week the latter part of October in Virginia 
and Maryland, visiting friends and relatives, this trip being his "sum 
mer" vacation. 

Miss Sarah Cheshire has been a guest at St. Mary's for part of th( 
time that her family has been absent at the General Convention. 

The Muse is pleased to announce the arrival of a little son at the hom( 
of Dr. and Mrs. C. L. Pridgen (Ila Rountree) in October, and also o1 
a son, born October 11, to Mr. and Mrs. Robert Bernhardt (Helen Cren 
shaw). Dr. and Mrs. Pridgen are now living in Raleigh. Mr. anc 
Mrs. Bernhardt's home is in Salisbury. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 



Alumnae Weddings 



Von Eberstein-Gaither 

On Wednesday evening, June 14th, Miss Mary Skinner Gaither, 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William G. Gaither, of Hertford, and Mr. 
William H. Von Eberstein were married at the home of the bride, the 
ceremony being performed by Dr. Robert Brent Dave, of Edenton. 
The maid of honor was Miss Bessie Blount Winslow and the brides- 
maids were Miss Mary Picard and Miss Nettie Gaither. Among the 
' out of town guests were Misses Mary Cooper, Elizabeth Leary and 
Eloise Robinson. 



MacDowell-DuBose 

Mrs. McNeely DuBose 

requests the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of her daughter 

Rainsford 

to 

Mr. John William MacDowell 

on Wednesday evening, September the tenth 

nineteen hundred and thirteen 

at half after eight o'clock 

Grace Church 
Morganton, North Carolina 



Haynes-Wilkjnson 

Mr. and Mrs. William Cook Wilkinson 
request the honor of your presence 
at the marriage of their daughter 
Rosalie 
to 
Mr. William Edward Haynes 
on the evening of Wednesday the fifteenth of October 
at nine o'clock 
Saint Peters Episcopal Church 
Charlotte, North Carolina 
At Home 
after the eighteenth of November 
Hinton, West Virginia 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 



UM£^i£^m^im±^i^.^ „„ „ .-„.....,_.... 

Collier-Sturgeon 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Allen Collier 

request the pleasure of your company 

at the marriage of their sister 

Miss Amelia Pinkney Sturgeon 

to 

Dr. Archibald Bailey Elkin 

on the evening of Tuesday, the twenty-first of October 

at half after eight o'clock 

Forty-eight Park Lane 

Atlanta, Georgia 

The account of this marriage in the Atlanta Sunday American is ol 
additional interest to Muse readers because of the number of St. Mary's 
girls, beside the bride, taking part in it. 

The marriage of Miss Amelia Sturgeon and Dr. Arch Elkin was an event o 
Tuesday evening, taking place at the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. Charles 
Collier, on Park Lane. 

Miss Passie May Ottley was maid of honor, Misses Jennie D. Harris and Hor 
tense Jones, of Asheville, bridesmaids, and the matrons were the sister of the 
bride, Mrs. Collier, and the sister of the bridegroom, Mrs. Edwin Moritz, of New 
York. A. D. Adair, Jr., was Dr. Elkin's best man, and the Rev. W. W. Mem 
minger officiated. 

The canopy beneath which the wedding party was grouped was formed oi 
smilax and pink roses fringed with lilies of the valley, and studded with hun- 
dreds of small electric lights. The prieu dieu was adorned with Easter lilies 
and at each end stood seven branch candelabra. Behind palms and ferns a string 
orchestra provided the wedding music, a harp solo, "Wagner's Evening Star," 
being played during the ceremony. 

The bride entered the drawing room with Mr. Collier, wearing a draped wed 
ding gown of white charmeuse with princess lace. Her veil was held in place 
with orange blossoms, and she carried a bouquet of orchids and valley lilies 

The maids wore white chiffon and tulle gowns over white charmeuse, and 
their flowers were pink roses and lilies of the valley. 

Mrs. Wilkinson, of Raleigh, sister to the bride, wore pale blue chiffon and 
lace, and Miss Anne Sturgeon wore cream brocade charmeuse and tulle, with a 
corsage of valley lilies. 

After the ceremony Dr. and Mrs. Elkin left for a wedding trip and on their 
return they will make their home with Mr. and Mrs. Collier. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 21 



pootc-Hunter 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank P. Hunter 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Mattie Caroline 

to 

Mr. Gaston Simmons Foote 

on the evening of Wednesday, the twenty-second of October 

at eight o'clock 

Trinity Church 

Portsmouth, Virginia 



At Home 
i after November first 
: t iil5 Waverly Boulevard 
Portsmouth, Virginia 



BaRer-Slade 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Williams Slade 

invite you to be present 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Penelope 

to 

Mr. Robert Weathersbee Baker 

on Tuesday evening, November the fourth 

nineteen hundred and thirteen 

at seven-thirty o'clock 

Trinity Church 

Columbus, Georgia 



CI ay poo I e- Broad foot 

Mr. and Mrs. John Barrett Broadfoot 
request the honor of your presence 
at the marriage of their daughter 
Frances Bryan 
to 
Mr. Jesse Stanley Claypoole 
on the evening of Wednesday, the fifth of November 
at six o'clock 
Saint James Church 
Black Mountain, North Carolina 
At Home 
after the first of December 
New Bern, North Carolina 



22 The St. Maky's Muse. 



On Wednesday evening, October 29th, Miss Sarah Wilson and Mr 
John Tate were married in Charlotte. 

Sarah Wilson was at St. Mary's in 1909, and is a niece of Col. anc 
Mrs. Chas. E. Johnson, of Raleigh. 



Gordon-CIarK 

Dr. and Mrs. Henry Irwin Clark 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Anna Barrow 

to 

Rev. William Jones Gordon 

on Wednesday afternoon, the fifth of November 

at one o'clock 

Trinity Church 

Scotland Neck, North Carolina 



H 



8 



Smith-Cooper 

Mr. and Mrs. David Young Cooper 

request the honor of your presence 

at the marriage of their daughter 

Genevieve 

to 

Mr. Claude Durham Smith 

on Wednesday, the twelfth of November 

at nine o'clock in the evening 

at the Church of the Holy Innocents 

Henderson, North Carolina 



READ !— M ARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
eaders of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
rinciple to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
o advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
heir loss, not ours. 



aleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 
Ready'to-Wear Garments 
Ten per cent off to College Girls 

Eije Jf astfjton **~g^ 



French 
Hat Shop 



Exclusive 
Millinery 



I thought I knew I knew it all, 
But now I must confess 

The more I know, I know I know 
I know I know the less. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 

the store of quality 

Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 



MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

LADIES' EINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 



1 It's worth the difference " 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography' 



ADVEKTISEMENT3. 



Established 1858 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L 0'QUINN& CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Raleigh, n. c. 

St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS. SKIRTS AND WAISTS 
DAY AND EVENING DAESSES 

WE SELL GOSSARD'S LACE 
FKONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



':t 



JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

ANDY — CHINA — TOTS 
PICTURKS STATIONERY 



Will some one throw a little light 
Upon a point not settled yet? 

What was the nature of the meal 
That Romeo and Juli-et? 



Why Is 

Brantley's Fountain 

The 
MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



THE MOST ADVANCED IDEAS 



THE DAINTIEST AND NEWEST OF PATTERNS 



The Latest Novelty Materials are inducted 
in our Great Showing of Merchan- 
dise That Appeals to th? 
College Students 

McKIMMON DRY GOODS Co. 



Advertisements. 



STATIONERY 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
ihe OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King'Crowell 
Iell Phone 135 



The Southern Educational Bureau 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Twenty-two yeara successful experience securing 
lesirable teachers for schools and colleges and 
ilacing competent teachers in satisfactory posi- 
ions. 

CONSERVATIVE AND CONFIDENTIAL 

C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 

f 174 
Both Phones: < 2 26 



Jolly Gr Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

No. 128 Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ 

FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



A woodpecker lit on a freshman head, 
And settled himself to drill; 

He bored away for half a day 
And finally broke his bill. 



KING'S GROCERY 
"The Little Store" 



HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 



HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Snoes 



BOYLAISUPEARCE CO. 
The Greatest Store in the City 

FOR THE 

SCHOOL GIKLS 



Advertisements. 



S. GLASS THE LADIES' STORE 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses, and 

Children. Ready-made wearing apparel. 
210 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

SHOES ! WHOSE ? 
POOL & CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street. 

Insure Against Loss by Fire 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

HALETGH, ST. C . 

YOUNG & HUGHES 

Plumbers, Steam Fitters, 

Hot Water Heating 

S. Wilmington Street 



KIN G-CRO WELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Street 






u- 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary. 



HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS SUITS, MILLINERY AND SHOES 

208 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C 



Who can explain the reason why 
One fellow will be six feet high, 
While yet another's six feet thick? 
'Tis strange but only Nature's trick. 



.ROSENTHAL 
SCO. 

GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
he Wake Drug- Store. Phones 228 



ICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE 
Prompt Delivery 



Phones 107 



T. F. BROCKWELL 

11 Kinds ol Keys Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired 



DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 



PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL CO. 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 

HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located at 
at his new store, 926 F. St., N. W., between 9th and 
10th Stp., Washington, D. C, is now showing the 
newest creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, 
cut-glass, diamonds, both American and imported 
watches, and many other articles of a desirable na- 
ture. Manufacturing of new jewelry and reparing 
of old a specialty. Class pins made to order. 

SALVATORE DESIO. No branch stores. 

WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 COR. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS 

T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



Good Things Always at 



BRETSCH'S BAKERY 



There are meters of measure 

And meters of tone, 
But the best way to meet 'er 

Is to meet 'er alone. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 



NORFOLK 



RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 



Via WASHINGTON, KTNSTON, GREENVILLE, FAEMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



if. w. croxton. 

Traffic Manager, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. TJPCHURCH, 

General Agrent, RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishings 



8 and 10 East Hargett Street 



Personal attention to mail orders. 



Bell Phone 438 



Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
1 18 E. Davie Street Raleigh N. C. 

ROBERT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh. N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 




WALK^OVEPv 

The Shoe for You 

WALK-OVER SHOE SHOP 

PvALEIGH, N. C. 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything In Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 



WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 
Picture Frames and Window Shades 



HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 



ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 



if 

<P 

:; 
to 
ft 
go 

):<> 
tto 

r 
ft 

St; 



Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 



M. W. (crazy about U. V.), after opening a pot of ginger ale for the punch: 
"Oh dear, I am so tired popping Virginia ale." 



C. D. ARTHUR 
Fish and Oysters 
CITY MARKET 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 E. Harg-ett Street 



JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 

Ladles' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 

204 S. Salisbury Street 

Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 



J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

THE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A. & M. 
Athletic Association- $1.60 per year. Walter 
C. Ta y lor, B us . Mgr., We st Raleigh, N. C. 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 



PERRY'S ART STORE 
8. Wilmington Street 



Advertisements 



Calendar, 1913 



eptember 16th, Tuesday — Arrival of new boarding pupils, 
eptember 17th, Wednesday — Arrival of old boarding pupils, 
eptember 18th, Thursday — Opening service of advent term, 
eptember 20th, Saturday — Opening reception to the new girls, 
eptember 27th, Saturday — E A n reception, 
.eptember 29th, Monday — Miss Abbott's recital, 
ctober 4th, Saturday — A P reception, 
ctober 9th, Thursday — Barnum & Bailey's circus, 
ictober 11th, Saturday — Annie Russel in "She Stoops to Conquer, 
ictober 18th, Saturday — S A reception. 
October 22d, 23d, Wednesday and Thursday — State Fair, 
ictober 31st, Friday — All Hallowe'en. 
Tovember 1st, Saturday — All Saints; Founder's Day. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars to San 
Francisco and other California points. All-yea: courist tickets on sale to 
principal Western points. Convenient local, as well as I iuu ugh trains. 
Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining Car Service on all through 
trains. Ask Representatives of Southern Pailway about special rates ac- 
count Christmas holidaos; also about various other speciol occasions. If 
you are contemplating a trip to any point, communicate with representa- 
tives of Southern Railway before completing your arrangements for same. 
They will gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to 
the cheapest and most comfortable wy in which to make %he trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleepin Car reservations for you. 

I F. CARY, General Pass. Apent, J. A. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent. 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

72d ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 18, 1913. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 22, 1914. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ ®- THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

rs instruction in these \ #. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: J ^ THE A RT SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



Autumn Jlumber 



Jlohemfrer, 1913 







ftaletgf), it C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

AUTUMN NUMBER 



Vol. XVlJT November, 1913. No. 2 



Hallowe'en 



Melba McCullers. 



Hallowe'en ! Oh, mystic night of untold witchery, with what awe 
dost thy very name inspire us, and what eerie visions of the unseen dost 
ithou conjure up before our ecstatic gaze ! Yea, can there be one so dull 
of spirit, who, in thinking of the horrors of this night, trembles not at 
its approach, nor, in anticipation of its many grewsome joys, feels no 
Bhivery thrills of pleasure ? Surely no such person exists. 

For Hallowe'en is the one season of all the year when witches with 
their attendant spirits roam the air and hitherto invisible ghosts make 
themselves visible to mortal eyes, while pumpkins and jack-o'-lanterns 
sweetly smile at every turn and death's heads glare from unsuspected 
corners. Ah, truly, Hallowe'en is a nerve racking season, and yet who 
would willingly be deprived of one small quota of its mysterious bliss ? 

From time immemorial Hallowe'en at St. Mary's has been the most 
eagerly awaited as well as the most exciting and thrilling day of all the 
year. And this Hallowe'en, indeed, proved no exception to the rule — 
far from it ! The very air seemed filled with mystery and excitement. 
As early as morning chapel time whispered consultations could be seen, 
iand everywhere smothered exclamations and joyous laughter could be 
heard. And all day long the excitement increased. A stranger gazing 
at these conspirators would need only one glance at the flushed faces and 
bright eyes to tell that it was Hallowe'en and that they were planning 
their costumes for the masquerade to be given that night. 

The "Grand March" was to begin at 8 :30, and how the moments did 
drag for those wise virgins who had completed their costumes, but, oh, 
for those foolish ones who had waited till the eleventh hour, with what 
swift wings did the hours fly ! 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



But now at last the time has come and the "big bell" peals forth its 
summons. From far and near, one and all, great and small, assemble 
in the parlor to form for the "Grand March." Then the procession, 
headed by a weird looking band of witches, marches to the gymnasium, 
which was to be the scene of the Hallowe'en festivities and which, most 
attractively decorated for the occasion with yellow pumpkin heads, hid- 
eous witches, black cats, owls, and grotesqueries of many kinds, seemed 
to be the very incarnation of the spirit of Hallowe'en. 

But, behold, when the procession has made the rounds of the "gym" 
several times, a peculiar silence follows and then, as all stand back in 
awe, the witches with stately tread march to the center of the "gym" 
and there, accompanied by sad, dirge-like music, they perform a weirdly 
solemn and grotesque dance, during intervals of which they utter the 
most unearthly cries, at the same time shaking skeleton-headed tam- 
borines. 

After such a spectacle as this, it is not surprising that the other 
masqueraders required a breathing spell before they could plunge into 
the thick of the dance. But after a few brave ones had made the first 
attempt, the floor was soon full. And what a conglomeration there was ! 
Fain would I tell of the costumes, but I draw back from such an under- 
taking, for every age, clime, and nation was here represented. Aye, 
truly, the whole gamut was run, from the stately colonial dame with 
powdered hair to the dudish darkey and his family. Beautiful Grecian 
maids, proud suffragettes, graceful ballet dancers, ghosts, fairies, gypsy 
fortune tellers, Little Bed Ridinghood, gallant cadets, picturesque Min- 
nehaha, silent pumpkins, dainty flower girls, a bonnie Scotch laddie, a 
handsome young farmer in overalls, a winsome milkmaid with her pail, 
and last but not least, Mrs. Wiggs and her whole family — all, all were 
here, dancing together without discrimination. 

What fun the unmasking was ! That was, perhaps, the gayest time 
of all. To think that Mrs. Wiggs, whom nobody knew and to whom 
some few had been rather rude, should turn out to be Miss Thomas ! 
And that those horrible witches who had given folks the "creeps" were 
only the Senior class ! 

But when the "witches" passed around candy and apples, all was for- 
given them, and everyone crowded to the tents of the fortune tellers to 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 



lave their palms read. But besides these tents there was a most super- 

latural fortune telling booth where beautifully written fortunes were 
distributed by unseen hands. 

But even the joys of Hallowe'en have an end, and at 10 o'clock every- 
one, even the last little ghost, had departed. One and all, even those 

who had drawn a fortune declaring that they "would never marry," or 
I that their "life would not be one of roses " unanimously agreed that they 
| had had the very best time in the world and that Hallowe'en should come 

mce a week instead of once a year. 



i 



- 



The Ducking of Peggy 



Annie Sutton Cameron. 



"Look yonder ! Peggy's at it again." 

The five or six boys lounging on the campus looked in the direction 
indicated. At a nearby window could be seen a dark head bent low 
over a book. 

"It's Livy or Horace, one," declared Holmes. "They're his special 
chums." 

"Well, then, no wonder he's so sleepy looking. He needs to be waked 
up. There's nothing so enlivening as a nice cold bath, and the river isn't 
'far. What do you say, boys ? Who'll volunteer for the good work V 
land Ed Howard sprang to his feet. 

"I," and "I," and "Me, too," came the chorus, and all six started for 
the cottage on the run. 

From the very beginning Paul Edward Gardner (otherwise Peggy) 
'had seemed "different." In the first place he had come rather late and 
Jie seemed never to have made up the lost time in getting acquainted 
'with the boys. He was delicate, too, and took no part in athletics ; he had 
( a girl's face, never knew what to do with his hands and feet, and blushed 
painfully on all occasions. Also he studied hard, which alone would 
have marked him as apart from the other inhabitants of "the cottage." 
Neither had the Sigma Betas, the governing body of that dwelling 
place, seen fit to enroll him as one of its members. 



28 The St. Mary's Muse. 

His suprise, then, was great, when six boys burst into his room; buti 
it rapidly grew into amazement when he was hauled unceremoniously | 
out of his chair, dragged down the steps and out of the house. 

It was late October and the wind blew coldly on the river bank.n 
Peggy shivered in the grasp of the enemy. 

"Now, boys," said Howard, ''you take his arms and I've got his feet, if 
There, there, Peggy love, a little bath is good for everyone now andu 
then. Are we all ready, now ? One — two — " 

"Look out, Ed !" 

But it was too late. Ed staggered a moment on the edge then plunged 
in head first. The next moment his face reappeared, white and drawn. 

"Cramps !" cried Holmes, and started forward ; but another was ahead 
of him. There was a cry, a splash, and a brown head bobbed up through 
the water. The boys gasped with astonishment. It was Peggy. With 
all his might he was supporting Howard and making for the shore. 
Breathlessly they watched his fight with the current ; slowly but bravely, 
inch by inch, he won his way. Would he never reach the bank?! 
Three — two — one more stroke — at last ! Ten eager hands grasped him 
and drew them safely to land. 

That night as Peggy lay propped up in a white bed at the infirmary, 
the door was opened softly and Holmes came in. He handed Peggy a 
white envelope. With trembling fingers he tore it open. It contained 
but two lines. "The honor of your presence is requested at the meeting 
of the Sigma Betas, October 26, 9 :30 p. m." 





Blowing Rock 



Florence Douglas Stone. 



To reach the village of Blowing Rock, one must take an automobile or 
other conveyance at Lenoir, the nearest railroad station, and drive 
twenty-three miles. After eleven miles the road, which is a well-kept 
toll road, begins to ascend the mountain ; and at times the scenery is 
magnificent. The road winds in and out ; now on the edge of a precipice, 
where one can look down a thousand feet or more to the green valleys 



The St. Mary's Muse. 29 



flow, dotted here and there with farms ; now through a forest of hem- 

ck trees, while gray, moss covered boulders and beautiful tangled 

ickets of ferns and wild flowers almost block the way. Near the 
.Lmmit is Hinkel's Falls — a waterfall which dashing from high up on 

e mountain, drops down almost to the very roadside. At this point 

te road begins winding in and out, through a belt of dark fir trees, and 
Inerging from which, one can see a mountain meadow, behind which is 

le of the hotels. 

Most of the hotels are about a mile from the village proper. A beau- 
iful walk, high above the roadside, bordered by rhododendrons, leads to 
■ie village from the hotels. 

Among some of the most interesting places to be seen are the Cone 
jhjjtjtate of thousands of acres, including two mountains, Flat Top and 
uch Mountain. From the Cone mansion one gets a magnificent view 
I the surrounding mountain ranges ; while at the foot of a sloping hill 
| front, dotted with seventy-five thousand apple trees, nestles a large 
!ike, covered at one end with white water lilies. 

f The "Blowing Rock" from which the village gets its name is a rock 
bout four thousand three hundred feet above sea level, from which, if 
ny light object is thrown, it will be blown back over the rock. 

The "Lonesome Trail" is a beautiful mountain trail winding along the 
ide of the mountain, hidden from and a little below the roadway, lead- 
lag to glen "Maxie" and glen "Burnia," through the forest. These are 
lountain brooks with many falls, with steep banks, damp with spray, 
Imich make an ideal home for ferns and wild flowers. 

From the hotel window one looks down over the valley of the Johns 
liver, two thousand and five hundred feet below, with "Hawk's Bill" 
,nd the Mitchell Range in the far distance, and noble old "Grand- 
atker," hoary with age, bounding the view on the east. 

•The scenery about Blowing Rock is wonderful and magnificent; it 
aight well be called "The garden of the gods." 



30 The St. Mary's Muse. 



- 



SCHOOL NEWS i 



Oct. 21— The Sigma Lambda Reception 

Never was the Muse Room a scene of more merriment and unre 
stricted gaiety than on the night of October 21st, when the annual 5 
reception was given, in honor of the new girls and the new faculty 
The guests, on entering the attractively decorated reception hall, were 
delightfully served with punch by Sadie Vinson. From the receptioi 
hall they were ushered into the Muse Room, where each one was cordiall} 
welcomed by the president, Lanie Hales, with her officers, Myrtle War- 
ren, Bessie Badham, Frances Strong, Bessie Burdine, Kate Lois Mont- 
gomery, and Mary Smith. 

And now how the minutes did fly ! It seemed there was scarcely time 
to chat with one's friends, to admire the Muse Room, artistically deco 
rated en 2 A, and to patronize the punch bowl efficiently and charmingly 1 
presided over by Courtney Crowther and Mary Allen, before lo ! it was, 
almost time to depart. But before this dreaded hour approached the! 
hearts of all were cheered by the appearance of refreshments, whict 
were soon discovered to be as good as they looked, and that is saying a 
great deal, for delicious themselves and with dainty favors of miniature 
banjoes and suitcases, they were graciously served by Lois Pugh, Etta 
Burt, Mary Michaux, and Penelope Gallop. 

And now, when truly it was indeed time to go, murmurs were heard on 
all sides of what a "grand reception" it had been and what a a good time" 
everyone had had. The presence of the Rector, who had been absent 
for an exceedingly long time (so it seemed) at the General Convention, 
enhanced to more than a few the pleasure of this most enjoyable occasion. 

M.McC. 
Oct. 22-23— The Fair 

The Fair has been the chief topic of conversation ever since school 
began, and especially the new girls have anticipated this with great in- 
terest. We didn't fuss a bit about having to go to school on Monday in 
order that we might have the two holidays ( ?), Wednesday and Thurs- 
day. There were lots of relatives and friends here, and altogether every- 
body had a jolly good time, even those who didn't "care to go." The 



The St. Mary's Muse. 31 



'eworks were the principal feature of the occasion, although there were 
ily a few who had the privilege of seeing them out at the grounds. 
!any of the shows, "Trip to Mars," "Ole Virginia Plantation," and 
st but not least the wonderful fortune tellers, were well patronized by 
e girls. There were some who took a real interest in the purpose of, 
e Fair, and found the time spent at the exhibits well worth while. 

Oct. 27 — Miss Isaacs' Recital 

The second Recital in the Faculty Concert series was given by Miss 

saacs, Monday evening, October 27th, in the auditorium. Miss Isaacs 

towed herself a pianist of unusual power and charm. The News and 

bserver said : 

Miss Rheta Isaacs, pianist, presented an interesting program last evening in 
Hf* 1 ;. Mary's Auditorium. The program included works from Chopin, Schar- 
enka (with whom Miss Isaacs studied for two years in Berlin), Schubert, 
iszt and Rubinstein. 

\Miss Isaacs plays with musical taste and finish; her technique is fluent and 
iJ3r style is good. She adds to these qualities a personality which attracts and 
fflds charm to her playing. The Eminor waltz of Chopin and the Liszt "Night- 
[tgale" were especially effective, and the Rubenstein Valse Caprice was given 
ith spirited rhythm and clean, full tone. 

Miss Isaacs was assisted by Miss Ethel Rowand, mezzo-soprano, who gave a 
farming a and b number, "Le Baiser," by Goring-Thomas, and "Love Is the 
find," by MacFadyen. Miss Rowand was warmly received and she responded 
ith an encore. "The Land o' the Leal," which brought out the rich tones of 
er voice and delighted the audience. Miss Nelly Phillips, as accompanist, 
ave good support to the singer and proved her own musicianship. 

Miss Isaacs' program was as follows: 



I. 

a) "Waltz (E minor) Chopin 

b) Waltz (A minor) Chopin 

II. 
Polish Dance (E flat minor) Scharwenka 

III. 

a) Le Baiser (A Memory) Goring-Thomas 

b) Love is the Wind MacFadyen 

IV. 

a) Impromptu (A flat) Schubert 

b) The Nightingale Liszt 

V. 
Valse Caprice Rubinstein 



32 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Nov. 5— Peace-St. Mary's Concert: Miss Loeb 

Miss Florence Loeb, contralto, gave the first concert in the St. Mary'i a 
Auditorium on the evening of the 5th. There was a good audience, wli 
were greatly pleased with Miss Loeb. Her very interesting program i I 
given, and an extract from the News and Observer. 

Miss Florence Loeb sang with consummate art in the brilliant recital las 
evening in St. Mary's Auditorium. Miss Loeb's diction is exquisite and he 
personality is compelling. Her voice is rich in quality and beautifully trained 

The French group, "Le Nil," by Leroux, and the "Elegie," by Massenet, witljiei 
violin obligato by Miss Muriel Abbott, was enthusiastically received. The En§ 
lish group, beginning with the "Hindu Slumber Song," by "Ware, and endini 
with "Love is the Wind," by MacFadyen, was particularly well received. 

Mr. R. Blinn Owen, at the piano, gave his usual artistic support to the singer 



31 



1. 
Aria from Samson and Delilah C. Saint-Saen. 

II. 

(b) Vergebliches Standchen | 
(a) Die Mainacht j 

(c) Friihlingsnact Schumann 

(d) Zueignung r. Straus 

(e) In Meiner Heimat ) 

,„. -r, y „ . .Richard Fran} 

(f) Pan j 

III. 

(a) Le Nil Xavier Lerous 

(b) Elegie Massene 

Violin obligato by Miss Mubiel Abbott. 

(c) Vision Erient 

(d) Bergere legere (18th Century) Weckerlir 

IV. 

(a) Hindu Slumber Song Wart 

(b) Ah! Love but a day Bead 

( c) Ferry me across the water 8. Homei 

(d) Love is the wind MacFadye% 

Nov. 8— The Muse Carnival 

On Saturday evening, November the 8th, the Muse Club gave its 
annual carnival in the basement of the Main Building. This year the 
scene of the gaiety was made especially attractive by the many ^aovel 
"side shows." On entering one bought tickets from the cashier which 
entitled her to see "Jovial Joe," "The Enchanted Frog," "The Magical 



The St. Mary's Muse. 33 



[irror," and before leaving one was sure to have had her fortune told, 
y'j'itnessed the marvelous "Pain's Fireworks," and had her picture taken 

1 the "most approved style." Ice cream, candies, fruits and peanuts 
i i r ere also sold, and the evening proved not only a profitable one for the 

[use Club but an enjoyable one to those who attended. 

Nov. 8— Mrs. Lay Entertains the Seniors 

On Saturday afternoon, November the 8th, Mrs. Lay entertained the 
ienior class very delightfully at the Rectory. A merry hour was spent 
Dgether while Mrs. Lay presided at the punch bowl and little Miss Vir- 
inia Lay passed sandwiches, cakes and candies. To those who have 
eijriad the good fortune to enjoy Mrs. Lay's hospitality, it is needless to say 
hat we had a most enjoyable time. 



34 The St. Maky's Muse. 



SCHOOL NOTES 



liiib 

— Laura Clark has returned from Scotland Neck, where she was maid 
of honor in the wedding of her sister, who formerly attended St. Mary's 

— The old girls who visited us during the Fair were Fannie McMul 
Ian, Janie Kerr, Edith Clark, Katharine Bunn, and Elizabeth Grogan 

— Emily Mizelle has had a pleasant visit from her sister. 

— Nellie Grice enjoyed a visit from her father and sister Fair Week 

— Marie Parsons, Anne Mitchell, Eliza Skinner, Miriam Reynolds, 
aiid Bessie Badham have had pleasant visits from their fathers. 

— Lizzie Winston and Rena Harding have enjoyed visits from their 
mothers. 

— -Myrtle Warren has had visits from her mother, sister and brother 

— Placide Clark and Sallie Heyward have been visited by their 
brothers. 

— Am ong those who have been home this month are : Virginia Davis 
Gladys Smith, Elizabeth Gold, Shepherd Branch, Katharine Butt 
Elizabeth Tarry, Lucy Bisset, Mabel Cooley, Annie Mae Freeman, and 
LizTie Winston. 

■ — Virginia Lee's parents visited her during the Fair. 

— Lorna and Georgia Hales have been up from Wilson to visit their 
sister Lanie. 

— Mattie Moye Adams's parents paid her a short visit. 

— Fannie Stallings's sister has been visiting her. 

— Winifred Rogers enjoyed a visit from her father. I 

— Dorothy Hood spent several days at St. Mary's during November, | 
as a guest of the Lays. 



TWe St. Mary's Muse. 



subscription. One Year s = = = One Dollar. 

I) Single Copies = = = s = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
e interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
m I Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 1913-1914. 

Lauba Margaret Hoppe,, Editor-in-Chief. 
Julia Allen. Nellie Wood. Margaret Bottum. 

Elizabeth Tarbt. Bessie Badham. Melba McCullers. 

Mart Clark Smith. Josephine V. Smith. Julia Coopeb. 

Sallie Hayward, Business Manager. 
Bessie Burdine, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



Founder's Day 

November the first, All Saints' Day, is also set apart at St. Mary's in 
ommemoration of Dr. Aldert Smedes and those who followed him and 
lelped to establish St. Mary's on that firm foundation upon which it 
low stands. With us here at St. Mary's it is one of "the days" of the 
r ear when our thoughts are turned to those who have gone before and 
:et the high standard which has always been the pride and heritage of 
ivery St. Mary's girl — refinement, culture, and the highest type of 
southern womanhood. 

The Literary Societies 

The three literary societies — Epsilon Alpha Pi, Sigma Lambda, and 
llpha Eho — have organized and begun work for the year 1913-14. 
Chese societies are for the purpose of promoting and cultivating literary 
;astes and interest, and the success of each organization rests with the 
ndividual member and not with the few officers. If we would all, as 
;he Sunday School superintendent says, "Come and bring another," 
;here would be a regular attendance and a genuine interest in the pro- 
grams. 

The meetings are held every Tuesday night, and on special occasions 
;here are inter-society meetings. The great event of the year is the inter- 



36 The St. Mary's Muse. 



society debate which occurs the last of April. This year, on account o^ |J 
there being three societies, there will be a debate before Xmas betweed 
E A n and A P and the victorious society will debate S A in April. 

Old St. Mary's girls are always interested in the little "personals- 
things" that go on here at school from year to year. This year oui 
schedule has been changed and perhaps it would be of interest to them 
to compare our present day routine with that of their "day." 



it 



School Days: 

Rising Bell 7:00 Recitations 1:45-3:45 

Breakfast 7:30 Physical Culture 4:00-5:0( 

Mail 8:00 Dinner 6:30 

Study Hour 8:30 Chapel or Prayers 7 : 00 

Chapel 9:00 Mail 7:30 

Recitations 9:30-1:00 Study Hour 8:00-9: 

Lunch 1:00 Lights Out 10:00 

Sundays: 

Rising Bell 7:30 Meditation Hour 3:30-4:3C 

Breakfast 8:30 Evening Service 5 : 00 



If 



101 



Sunday Lesson 10:00 Supper 6 : 00 

Morning Service 11 : 00 Lights Out 9 : 30 

Dinner 1:00 

Regular Appointments: 

Tuesdays 7 : 30 Literary Societies. 

Thursdays 7:00 "Thursday Talks." 

Thursdays 7 : 30 Muse Club. 

Fridays 7 : 30 Choir Practice. 

Saturdays 7 : 30-9 : 30 Free Evening. 

Sundays , 7 : 00 Choir. 

Sundays (As appointed) Chapter Meeting. 

The Smallpox Case 

Surely a case of smallpox is an event and such an event deserves 
historic record, and will besides probably be a matter of interest to most 
of our readers. 

The patient went to the Infirmary for other reasons on Wednesday, 
October 29th. Smallpox was suspected on Friday in the middle of the 
day, but the diagnosis could not be sure until the next day. The Rector rei 
was informed of this suspicion at 12 :40 p. m. on Friday, and at once 
took measures to prevent any alarm, and to insure confidence. All the 



. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 37 



'Indents were called together at 4:00 o'clock and informed of the exact 

eei [ tuation. The members of the School were asked not to leave the 

rounds until told to do so, and the students and other friends in town 

tare asked not to come to the School until notice was given, and espe- 

.ally not to come to the Hallowe'en party that night. It was thought 

V the School Physician that there was absolutely no danger, but these 

leasures were taken in order that others might consult their own feel- 

lgs on the subject. 

A letter was written to the parents of all boarding pupils, and was 

lailed before midnight of Friday, informing them of the exact state of 

>ie case. The vaccination of the students, faculty and servants was 

egun at once on Friday afternoon, and carried through as quickly as 

ossible. 

The City Physician was put in charge of the case, so as to avoid any 

sfoing back and forth by the School Physician. In Saturday afternoon's 

taper a statement was published of the facts as then known, and in 

lunday morning's paper the City Physician wrote a letter also giving 

tie facts, with the diagnosis of smallpox as then known, and assuring 

veryone there was no danger whatever and that it was safe to come to 

file School. 

It was fortunate that the patient went to the Infirmary so early, as in 
his way any general contact was avoided. Those, however, who were 
n the Infirmary at any time with her were thoroughly disinfected, as 
^ell as vaccinated, and her room-mate was isolated thereafter for the 
ull period of incubation. The patient herself on Saturday had no 
emperature and was feeling perfectly well, and has continued to 
progress through her case, which is a mild one, with perfect success 
ince. 

The girls behaved splendidly, as did the parents also, although it is 

natural for those at a distance to feel more nervouse than those who are 

>n the ground. Six of the boarding pupils were taken home, but all 

Returned except two who are detained, one case by her own illness and 

,he other case by the illness of others. 

All the town pupils came back to school on Tuesday, when the session 



38 The St. Mary's Muse. 



regularly took place, except four, and three of these returned a few day I 
thereafter. | jjt 

The case is the only one in Raleigh, and it remains a mystery how i ea 
was contracted. One would naturally think of the circus and the Stat) I 
Fair, and it may have been caught there, although it is strange that n<si 
one else caught the disease, and those sources seem less likely because 
they occurred at times that were the extreme limits possible for three 
disease. ie 

At any rate it is pleasant to note the absence of all panic or undu< I 
alarm at the School, and the excellent behaviour of the girls as a whole I 
The Rector also appreciates the confidence that was shown by the almost 
unanimous action of parents, both here and elsewhere. We feel thai I 
the policy of immediate and full information was wisest, as has beer,! 
testified by the manner in which everybody seems to have regarded them 
case. 

Smallpox is a most unpleasant disease to think about, but at leasee 
the case is mild, and one knows exactly what to do to prevent any spread 
and to handle it properly. 

The Rector's Trips Elsewhere 

Many important meetings demanded the attendance of the Rector oiL 
St. Mary's this fall, several of which, although they were important, he.u 
was unable to attend. He has, however, been absent three times. 

The first trip was to ISTew York during the session of the Genera] 
Convention, in attendance, not upon the Convention itself, but upoE 
two series of meetings, one in connection with Social Service, and thej 
other in connection with Education. 

At the last Diocesan Convention the Rev. Dr. Mallett, Rector of the 
Church in Salisbury, was elected Commissioner on Social Service for^ 
the Diocese, and he appointed as his co-adjutors, Dr. Joseph Hyde 
Pratt, of Chapel Hill, and Mr. Lay. The attendance upon the Social 
Service meetings in New York was therefore most fruitful in giving 
information which will be useful hereafter for work in this Diocese. 

The series of meetings on Education, including a joint session of the 
two Houses of the General Convention, were of the utmost interest 



The St. Mary's Muse. 39 



ijitie last two days of the week were taken up by a Conference of Head 
istresses of Secondary Schools for Girls, which the Rector had the 
i|i;easure of attending in the unique character of a Head Mistress for 
e first time in his life. In the absence of one of the appointed speak- 
s he also by request spoke on one of the assigned subjects. Much in- 
rmation and instruction was derived from the meeting with these 
ueads of a large number of our Church Institutions for Girls all over 
e country. 

i Education was one of the great subjects at the Convention, the others 
ising Social Service, Missions, and Church Unity. In the discussions 
:i Education it was evident that the Church is waking up to its responsi- 
ility for leading in the formation of character, which is the funda- 
mental necessity in all proper training of the young. The greatest prob- 
lem before the educational world is with regard to the methods of teach- 
g morals and creating character under our educational system. Every- 
one sees that this is a difficult matter, and most are agreed that the 
lljhurch has a very heavy responsibility to lead in any effective work 
tat is to be done. 

Among other meetings the Rector attended a dinner in the interest of 

hurch Education. At this dinner the presiding officer announced that 

%e music was furnished by Harry Burleigh. It was a great pleasure to 

%e Rector to have a few minutes talk with one who had been a member 

' his choir in Erie, Pennsylvania, when Mr. Lay was the assistant at 

il4at Church and had charge of the boy choir. Harry Burleigh is a 

«>9gro, and is well-known as a successful composer, one of his best known 

^>ngs being "Jean, My Jean," and is an editorial writer on one of the 

lading musical journals. Also, however exaggerated the statement was, 

* was pleasant to hear him say that he owed his start in Church music 

r'ad his musical success to the present Rector of St. Mary's School. 

h The Rector hopes to have next June another Conference of the clergy 

%d laity of North and South Carolina, and he has the promise of Rev. 

?S[r. Crouch, the General Secretary on Social Service, to be present, and 

le Rev. Mr. Gardiner, Secretary of the General Education Board, also 

Promised to be present, or to send the Rev Mr. Bradner, his assistant, in 

is place. It is planned to have Education and Social Service as the 



40 The St. Mart's Muse. 



: 



two leading subjects of the Conference, and in connection to have som 
conference on Sunday School work. 

The Eector was again absent from Tuesday, ASTovember 4th, to iSf 
vember 11th, on a trip to Asheville, Xorth Carolina, and Knoxvillef 
Tennessee. 

On the morning of Wednesday, Xovember 5th, while he was the gue 
of Mr. and Mrs. Harmon A. Miller, of Asheville, he had a most def 
lightful meeting with twenty or thirty of the Alumnse, and spoke t 
them quite at length with regard to the past history, the present con- 
ditions, and the future prospects of the School. All seemed to be ver 
much interested in what they heard, and in the answers to some of th 
questions which were asked. 

Thursday and Friday, iSTovember 6th and 7th, he spent in Knoxville 
Tennessee, where the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools o 
the Southern States had their meeting, as the guest of the University o 
Tennessee. This Association is in certain lines the most influential anc 
useful of all the Associations in connection with education in the South 
It admits to full membership certain institutions as being colleges, anc 
others as being full secondary schools, whose graduates are entitled t 
college entrance. 

The Eector read a paper by request on the subject, "What Can Thi 
Association Do For Institutions That Are Xot Colleges, But Are Beyonc 
Secondary Schools." This proved a live subject which occasioned con 
siderable interest and discussion. 

It may be well to give some slight idea of the subject and its impor™ 
tance, although the whole paper will be published later in a Schoo K 
Bulletin. 

There are one hundred and forty-two institutions for the education oi 
girls and young women in the South, which are either called colleges oi 
else give an academic degree. A half of these do no work beyond college 
entrance. Only five of them have been admitted to membership in the 
Association as colleges, and only ten or twelve more can expect to be 
colleges in the near future. St. Mary's School, Peace Institute, and one 
or two others, are also doing work beyond college entrance, but do not 
use the name college or give a degree. It is evident that the education 



i 



The St. Mart's Muse. 41 



[ young women in the South lies largely in the hands of these institu- 
ns between the secondary school and the college, and it is only by 
ablishing in them proper standards, and encouraging them in honest 

] (|1 irk that the proper idea of what constitutes good education can be 
read abroad among the people at large, and that the proper influence 

lii be brought to bear on the preparatory schools to give full prepara- 
jh for a college course. As it is, half of these institutions laying claim 
college rank do no college work and are not superior to a good 
?h school. The paper read simply requested that institutions two 
jars beyond ordinary entrance requirements should be examined at 
I end of their second year, and given at that point certification for 
liege entrance, and that similar standardization should be established 
i institutions one and three years ahead of the full high school 
andard, but below the full college standard. 

. On his return from Knoxville, Tennessee, the Rector was the guest 
om. Saturday, November 8th, to Tuesday morning, November 11th, 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore F. Davidson. He was enabled to meet a 
imber of interesting people whom he had not seen before, and to call 
. most of the Alumnae and other friends of the School. Altogether he 
,d a most enjoyable, interesting time in Asheville, and this was largely 
ie to the kind efforts of those who entertained him on his two visits. 
On October 29th the Rector attended the meeting of the Convocation 
Charlotte, in Greensboro. While the time was short he derived much 
easure and profit from his visit. He was asked to speak about the 

Jfiool, and his remarks were received with attention and apparent in- 
fest. 



42 The St. Mart's Muse. 



THE EXCHANGES 



Mabgabet Bottom. 



The Muse takes great pleasure in acknowledging the receipt of tl 
following magazines : The Erothesian, the Messenger, the Wake Fore, 
Student, Ohicora Almacen, the Echo, the Deaf Carolinian, Stetso 
WeeHy, Carolmian, Wau Gau Rac, the Focus, Westminster Review 
Chronicle, Quill, Pine and Thistle, Tatler, the University Magazin 
Enterprise, Home Scholasticae, the Western Maryland College Monthh 
Davidson College Magazine. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN-CLIPPINGS 

IS LATIN A DEAD LANGUAGE? 
Tango Tangere Turki Trotum. — Life. 

* * * 
WHY HE REFUSED. 

A young theologian named Fiddle 

Refused to accept his degree, 
"For," said he, " 'tis enough to be Fiddle 

Without being Fiddle, D. D." 

— Philadelphia Public Ledger. 

* * * 

APPLIED MATHEMATICS. 



(1 



31 



k 



I sometimes wonder what's the use 

Of squaring the Hypothenuse, 

Or why, unless it be to tease, 

Things must be called Isoscees. 

Of course I know that mathematics 

Are mental stunts and acrobatics, 

To give the brain a drill gymnastic 

And make gray matter more elastic — 

Is that why Euclid has employed 

Trapezium and Trapezoid, 

I wonder? — yet it seems to me 

That all the Plain Geometry 

One needs, is just this simple feat — 

Whate'er your line, make both ends meet! 

— Anne W. Young in Harper's Magazine. 



if 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Cruikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 



St. Mary's Aluminas Association. 

Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

HnTjnR*T»v Vrpp-PRFRinFNTs - / MrB - Kate de R - Me are8, Wilmington. 

HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS j Mfs j M(jK _ p ittenger> R a l e igh. 

President .... Miss Anna N. Buxton. 

Vice-President - Mrs. F. H. Busbee, Raleigh. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL 



The Raleigh Alumnae Meeting 

IThe Founders' Day meeting of the Raleigh chapter of the Alumnae 
is held in the parlor at St. Mary's on November 3d, at 4 o'clock, at 
rich thirty members were present. Miss Dortch, the new Chairman, 
id Miss Susan Marshall, the new Secretary, were in charge of the 
meting. Following the reading of the minutes of the last meeting Mr. 
jy, at the invitation of the Chairman, spoke informally to the meeting, 
3 talk being largely an answer to a question put him by one of the 
lmnse as to the standing of St. Mary's graduates for college entrance. 
r. Lay said particularly that the important thing was that a girl should 
nounce her intention of entering college at least two years before her 
aduation, in fairness to herself and St. Mary's. He also explained 
lly the meaning of the 60 points required for graduation and the use 
; and restrictions in electives. 

)Mr. Lay was followed by Miss Thomas, of the St. Mary's Faculty, 
10 spoke most interestingly and enthusiastically of the St. Mary's Girl 
Today. 

Miss Lee gave her report as Treasurer, which showed over $400 
ready turned in to the general fund during the year. The Chapter hav- 
g voted to empty its treasury into that of the general association, the 
tire balance, $37.25, was turned over to the Treasurer of the general 
sociation. Miss Root offered a motion that the Raleigh Chapter should 
mmit itself to the work outlined at the general meeting in May, that is, 
at it should make the enrollment of new members the chief work of 



44 The St. Mary's Muse. 



the year. The motion carried, and this will be the important work 
the year. Plans for carrying it out are now being made. 

After the business part of the meeting tea was served, and a vei 
pleasant social hour followed. 

An informal notice of the ISTew York Chapter's meeting has come v 
The hostesses were Miss Christine Busbee and Miss Mary Pride Jone 
The meeting was a small one on account of rain, but was much enjoye 
as these New York meetings always are. It is hoped we may soon ha\ 
a full report of this and other Founders' Day meetings. 



Miss Buxton, the President of the Alumna? Association, is to be i 
Texas for several months this winter. Her ideas for the Alumna? wot 
will be announced later. 



Alumnae Weddings 



Wales — Winston 

On November 8th Miss Duncan Cameron Winston, of Edenton, an 
Mr. Charles P. Wales, of Elizabeth City, were married in St. Pau 
Church, Edenton. 

Miss Winston was at school during Mr. Bratton's rectorship and aftei 
wards taught one year at St. Mary's. 



Green-BaKer 

Dr. and Mrs. Julian Meredith Baker 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Sue Foxhall 

to 

Dr. William Wills Green 

on the evening of Wednesday the 

nineteenth of November 

at half after eight o'clock 

Howard Memorial Presbyterian Church 

Tarboro, North Carolina 



The St. Mary's Muse. 45 

Thornton — Woo If 

Judge Samuel Gholson Woolf 

requests the honour of your presence at the 

marriage of his daughter 

Frances Elizabeth 

to 

Mr. James Innes Thornton 

on Wednesday November the twenty-sixth 

at high noon 

Trinity Church 

Demopolis, Alabama 



Battle-Marriott 
Oiji Dr. and Mrs. Henry Battle Marriott 

announce the marriage of their daughter 
Emily 
to 
Dr. Ivan Proctor Battle 
"Wednesday, November the nineteenth ■ 
nineteen hundred and thirteen 
Saint John's Church 
X Battleborough, North Carolina 

d 



Kerr-Lee 

Dr. and Mrs. A. M. Lee 

request the honor of your presence at the 

marriage of their daughter 

Rena 

to 

Mr. Langdon Chevis Kerr 

on Wednesday afternoon, the twenty-sixth of November 

one thousand nine hundred and thirteen 

at five-thirty o'clock 

St. Paul's Episcopal Church 

Clinton, North Carolina 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and tb 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a goo__ 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays thei 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it i 
their loss, not ours. 



Hi 



le;' 




Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Ready tO' Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls 



Pass in the jokes both young and old 
And let them all be read and told. 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 

the store of quality 

Dry Goods 

OF ALL KINDS 



MILLINERY 



Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 

£JDIES' FINE SHOES AT© SLIPPERS 



' It's worth the difference" 



THE TYREE STUDIO 



" Workers in Artistic Photography 



Advertisements. 



Established 1858 



MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 



LEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



H_ 

| CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
EADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store 

>YALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 
DAY AND EVENING DAESSES 

WE SEEL GOSSARD'S LACE 
FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

r, ANDY CHINA TOYS 

PICTURES STATIONERY 



All the birds were singing early 

Tho' you'd think it would make them blue 
To wake each blessed morning 

With their bills all overdue. 



— Exchange. 



Why Is 

rantley's Fountain 

The 

MOST POPULAR? 

Ask the Girls 



THE MOST ADVANCED IDEAS 



THE DAINTIEST AND NEWEST OF PATTERNS 



The Latest Novelty Materials are included 
in our Great Snowing of Merchan- 
dise That Appeals to ths 
College Students 

McKIMMON DRY GOODS Co. 



Advertisements. 



STATIONERY 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 
Bell Phone 135 

The Southern Educational Bureau 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Twenty-two years successful experience securing 
desirable teachers for schools and colleges and 
placing competent teachers in satisfactory posi- 
tions. 

CONSERVATIVE AND CONFIDENTIAL 



C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT GOMPANfi 

Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones: 



174 
226 



Jolly €r Wynne Jewelry Cq)~ 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

No. 1 28 Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



H. STEINMETZ 



FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquet 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plant 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



As Phunnie was going out one eve 
His father questioned, "whither?" 

And Phunnie, not wishing to deceive 
With blushes answered, with her." 



le 



— Exchange. 



KING'S GROCERY 
"The Little Store" 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE 
GYMNASIUM SHOES 

HERBERT ROSENTHAL 
Ladies' Fine Shoes 



BOYLAN^PEARCE CO. 
The Greatest Store in the City 

FOR THE 

SCHOOL GIRLS 



Advertisements. 



| LASS THE LADIES' STORE 

ything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses, and 
nildren. Ready-made wearing apparel, 
/ayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 

POOL & CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street. 



Insure Against Loss by Fire 

ompanies Represented, Bonding Solicited 

HE MECHANICS SAVINGS BANK 

RALEIGH, N. G. 

YOUNG & HUGHES 

.bers, Steam Fitters, 

Hot Water Heating 

1 S. Wilmington Street 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 



ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary. 
HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS SUITS, MILLINERY AND SHOE8 

208 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



.e knocker is also a quitter. That is, he quits everything except knocking 
knocks everything except quitting. — Trinity Archive. 



.. ROSENTHAL 
I CO. 

GROCERS 

ILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
The Wake Drug Store. Phonee 228 

HICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE Phones 107 

PROMPT DELIVERY 

T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys Bicycles Supplies 

Typewriters If all Kinds Repaired. 

DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOMSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 
12 W. Hargett St. 

RALEIGH FLORAL COMPANY 
CHOICE CUT FLOWERT 

Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 

Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 

HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



SALVATORE DESIO, who is now located a 
new store, 926 F St., N. W., between 9th and 
Sts., Washington, D. C, is now showing the ne 
creations in fine 14 K. jewelry, silverware, cut-gj 
diamonds, both American and imported wat| 
and many other articles of a desirable na 
Manufacturing of new jewelry and repairing o: 
a specialty. Class pins made to order. 



SALVATORE DESIO. 



||E 
No dranch stores, ifr 

yes. 



WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 
CREAM 

Phone 123 Cor. SALISBURY AND HARETT 



T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders s< .1 1 

RELEIGH, N. C. 



1 8 



Good Things Always at 



BRETSHH'S BA 



£%; 



He— "Look at that engine boiler." 
She — "Why do they boil engines?" 
He — "To make the engine tender." 



Norfolk Southern Railroai 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

RALEIGH 

NEW BERN 

GOLDSBORO 

Via WASHINGTON. KINSTON, GREENVILLE, EARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



0< 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



w. w. CROXTON, 

Traffic Managrer, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. UPCHURCH, 

General Agent, RALEIGH, N, 



Advertisements. 



H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
i i dware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
'es. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
and value. 



TOYLAND 

Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishings 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 

.1 attention to mail orders. Bell Phone 438 



js and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

r S. Carves, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 
Board, Livery and Exchange 
Davie Street Raleigh N. C 

JRT SIMPSON 

Druggist and Prescriptionist 

'ES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 




WALKOVER 

The Shoe for You 

WALK-OVER SHOE SHOP 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 

Picture Frames and Window Shades 

hayes & hall 

STUDIO 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 
Made Fresh Every Day 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 



r. Stone — "How many words are there in the English language?' 
•om Senior Row — "Twenty-six." 







t C. D. ARTHUR 
Fish and Oysters 
CITY MARKET 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 


)ORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 E. Hargrett Street 


MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 


rs' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury Street 


Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

THE WAU GAU RAC: Official Organ of the A. & M. 
Athletic Association. $1.50 per year. Walter 


Call PLUMMER'S Stables 
RIDING AND DRIVING HORSES 


C. Taylor, Bus. Mgr., West Raleigh, N. C, 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street 


PERRY'S ART STORE 
S. "Wilming-ton Street 



Advertisements 



Calendar, 1913 



September 16th, Tuesday — Arrival of new boarding pupils. 

September 17th, Wednesday — Arrival of old boarding pupils. 

September 18th, Thursday — Opening service of advent term. 

September 20th, Saturday — Opening reception to the new girls. 

September 27th, Saturday — E A n reception. 

September 29th, Monday — Miss Abbott's recital. 

October 4th, Saturday — A P reception. 

October 9th, Thursday — Barnum & Bailey's circus. 

October 11th, Saturday — Annie Russel in "She Stoops to Conquer. 

October 18th, Saturday — 2 A reception. 

October 22d, 23d, Wednesday and Thursday — State Fair. 

October 31st, Friday — All Hallowe'en. 

November 1st, Saturday — All Saints; Founder's Day. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars to San 
Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tickets on sale to 
principal Western points. Convenient local, as well as through trains- 
Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining Car Service on all through 
trains. Ask Representatives of Southern Pailway about special rates ac- 
count Christmas holidays; also about various other special occasions, if 
you are contemplating a trip to any point, communicate with representa- 
tives of Southern Railway before completing your arrangements for same. 
They will gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to 
the cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you. 

H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, J. A. JONES, Traveling Pass. Age 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women) 

72d ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 18, 1913. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 22, 1914 



1. THE COLLEGE. 
St. Mary's \ ®- THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

offers instruction in these V &• THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: j ^ THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education without slight to the 
Scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. George W. Lay, 

Rector. 



Spring dumber 



iHarcf), 1914 







ftaletgf), &. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

SPRING NUMBER 
Vol. XVIII. March, 1914. No. 4 

Spring 



Annie Sutton Cameron. 



There's a pulsing in the earth, 

A quivering in the air; 
There's a throbbing of awakening life 

And a mystery everywhere; 
And the birds in bush and hedgerow 

Thrill with rapture as they sing 
And our hearts awake and quiver 

At the presence of the Spring. 

And our souls are raised in gladness 

As we see the wondrous sight 
Of the whole world bathed in glory 

And in resurrection light; 
For the miracle of life is shown 

In each bank and bush and clod, 
And the mystery of a thousand worlds 

Unfolds in each wee bud. 

And in spite of all the wisdom 

And the wondrous art of man, 
There is something in this wonder 

He can never understand; 
For the mystery within it 

Is not a human thing, 
He may only bow in reverence 

To the God who made the Spring. 



Why David Graham Changed H»s Mind 



Melba McCullers. 



The morning was one of the coldest and bitterest of all that awful 
winter at Valley Forge. The men huddled about the rude camp table, 
eating their scanty breakfast and vainly trying to fight off the ever- 



50 The St. Mary's Muse. 



increasing cold by their cheerful stories and jests whose point, no mat- 
ter how far fetched, never failed to gain a laugh from all. No, not 
from all, for at the extreme end of the table sat David Graham moodily 
drinking his weak and much diluted coffee and devouring his hard, stale 
biscuit. He, indeed, did not joint in the jokes and laughter, nor did 
he notice his companions at all, so intent was he on his own thoughts 
which, judging from the hard expression of his mouth and his deep 
frown, seemed far from pleasant. "By my faith," he muttered to him- 
self, with sudden determination, "I'll stand it no longer," and, pushing 
back his chair, he abruptly left the table. 

Graham, full of his new determination, made his way to the captain's 
tent, where, with scant ceremony, he burst in upon that good gentleman, 
in whose shocked and astonished ears he poured forth his complaints in 
a torrent of bitter and angry words. "But you can't accuse me of not 
loving the cause," he ended by saying, "for that is not true. My heart 
is as much with the cause as yours or any one else's, but it is a lost 
cause. Why, sir, how can our army defeat the British, how can it even 
hope to do so, when we are all half frozen and half starved ? You know 
yourself that there are barely blankets enough to go around, and even if 
we had a dozen instead of the one we have, we could hardly keep out the 
biting cold of the snow and rain. And as for shoes, there is not a man 
that possesses one whole decent pair. But we could almost endure this 
freezing cold if we had enough to eat, The food was bad enough at 
first, but even that would be luxury compared to the hard-tack and 
bacon we are having now, and I hear that tomorrow we will be reduced 
to hard-tack and parched corn. I don't see how we can be expected to 
fight at all, much less to win, and I, for one, can stand it no longer. I 
ask you to release me." 

"That is more than I can do," answered the captain, who had not yet 
recovered from his surprise. "You will have to see General Washing- 
ton about it." 

"Well," responded young Graham," I am willing to do even that to 
leave. I am sure the general will release me when he knows everything. 
If he has any pity at all he will surely do so. When he hears of all my 
suffering General Washington will release me." 



The St. Maky's Muse. 51 



"What's all this about suffering and who is it that I am going to re- 
lease?" demanded a stern voice, and the next instant the tall figure of 
Washington himself entered the tent. 

Both G-raham and the captain were completely taken by surprise, but 
the latter recovered himself first and answered, "General, this young 
man wants to be released from 1 the army and says — " 

Washington turned on Graham swiftly, "Is this true V he demanded, 
and his keen blue eyes seemed to pierce through and through the sur- 
prised youth who could answer only with a nod. "Why," continued 
Washington. "Why do you wish it ?" 

By this time Graham had regained his self-control and he answered 
bravely, "Because I can bear the hardships no longer. I am half frozen 
now." 

"Frozen," echoed Washington calmly, "Is that all ?" 

"I should think that it would be enough," answered Graham, hotly, 
"But besides that I am half starved." 

Washington turned to the captain, "I did not know you were starving 
the men. I had a biscuit and some coffee for my breakfast. Tell me, 
are you starving the men in order that I may have plenty ?" 

Graham gave a start of surprise. The general's breakfast had been 
the same as his and yet he called it "plenty." He could think of noth- 
ing to say, but he could not let the general think he had no break- 
fast, so he murmured miserably, "I — I had a biscuit and some coffee, 
I but—" 

"Then, why say you are starving? That is all any of us have had 

! and we are still alive. With regard to the freezing, though, you may 

I take my blanket. Perhaps that will help you some, and I can manage 

all right, for I am not so cold-natured as you seem to be. We hope to 

! have more clothing and better food very soon and so, if you have no 

other reasons, I really don't see why I should release you. Of course, 

if you have other reasons, it would be different. Are there any other 

reasons why I should release you?" 

"There are none, sir," young Graham shamefacedly answered. He 
was dumb-founded to think that Washington had only one blanket and 
that he had offered that to him. He looked at the general more care- 



.. 



52 The St. Mary's Muse. 



fully and saw that his face was thin and care-worn, and that his clothes 
were quite as poor and scanty as his own. 

His shoes, indeed, were even worse, for he noticed that Washington 
left behind him a faint trail of blood. How little and small he must 
appear in the eyes of this man who endured such hardships uncom- 
plainingly. 

He felt that he must say something to redeem himself, but what could, 
he say? "Sir," he began slowly, "you have just taught me a lesson, a 
lesson which I will never forget. I came here to get release from the 
army because I felt that I could no longer endure the hardships and also 
because I felt that the cause was lost and that I could do no good here, 
while if I went back to my home I could be of use to my family and 
friends. But you have made me see that the cause will not be lost if 
all men follow your example. I see now that my place is here and I 
mean to stay here and help win the fight." 

"Ah, now you are showing the right spirit," cried Washington, and 
his eyes brightened and he smiled kindly. For a moment he regarded 
Graham silently and thoughtfully, and then he said slowly, "I have a 
vacancy that must be filled immediately. It is that of the first lieu- 
tenant who died yesterday. I have not been able to find the right man, 
but I think you will do. Will you accept the position ?" 

Graham could scarcely believe his ears. Was such a thing possible ? 
A great joy shone in his eyes, but he answered hesitatingly, "I will be 
only too glad to if you think I will do." 

Washington reassured him and told him to come and talk it over with 
him that night. Graham walked to the door in a daze, then turned and 
said to Washington in a meek but hopeful voice, "I think I will stay up 
tonight and write some letters and, general, won't you — er — er-take my 
blanket ?" 

A tender smile illumined Washington's face, but he answered laugh- 
ingly, "Thank you, sonny, but I don't think I need it. Don't forget 
tonight." 

All the rest of the day Graham was very quiet, but at supper he told 
his friends the whole story. When he had finished he raised his coffee 
cup and cried, "Boys, I have a toast to propose, one I know you will all 
drink to. Here's to George Washington — and may God bless him." 



The St. Maey's Muse. 53 



A Bit of Present Day Mexico 



(Being part of a letter to Josephine Wilson, whose home is in San Luis Potosi, from her uncle whose 
home is in Tampico, and who writes of a trip he made last fall to visit his brother, Miss Wilson's father. 

I left Tampico on Saturday morning at about six o'clock together 
with the usual crowd of passengers, some fifteen of whom were coming 
to San Luis Potosi. We traveled for about three hours without inci- 
dent or accident, when we were stopped by a red flag, the usual danger 
signal. 

The flag was waved by the Rebel Chief Jose Rodriguez Cabo, who in- 
formed us that we were in no danger from him or his men, and that he 
was not fighting passengers, but the government, and that all we had was 
safe, and he was going to take us as near as possible to the next station, 
and leave us to find our way in the best we could, after which he intended 
to burn our train just as he had ordered to be burned a bridge we had 
just passed. The express car was emptied, the mail was overhauled, 
some burned, some carried away, and the train was started towards the 
next station as had been promised. The only thing that prevented our 
arrival was the approach of a body of Federal soldiers, whose arrival 
so disconcerted the Rebels that they left the two passenger coaches and 
ran away with the engine and baggage car, and turned them loose to 
run into the bridge they had fired sometime before. The Federal sol- 
diers, who were afoot, could not catch the Rebels, who took to the woods. 

Meantime, most of the passengers, all those who could carry their 
baggage, had left the train to walk to the next station, some five miles 
away. We, who remained, were one American lady, and three Ameri- 
can men, in the first class coach, and a couple of women in the second 
class coach. We remained in the coach until eight o'clock that night, 
some seven hours, and then the station agent sent a hand-car to bring 
us in. We three men had had the idea of preparing for a possibly 
longer stay, and had made such provision as was possible, and had got 
together some bread, raw tomatoes, some sardines, and had filled and 
hidden a bottle of water, for fear that the Federal soldiers would drink 
all there was in the two cars, which they very promptly did. When I 
tell you that the soldiers who remained as a guard for the coaches were 



. 



54 The St. Mary's Muse. 



relieved by others who came on the hand-car that took us in, and that on 
the car there some eighteen of us, you can imagine how we were packed. 
On the way in to the station, one of the American men had some kind 
of a fainting spell, and we had to stop the car and resuscitate him, thus 
giving us an added element of excitement, for it looked for a while, as 
though he would not come to, and we had not as much as a bottle of 
smelling salts. Amongst the "remedies" suggested by the people on 
the hand-car was one that appealed to my sense of the ridiculous — "blow 
smoke in his face," and one of the soldier women did it. Whether it 
was that the smoke was efficacious, or that it was about time for the man 
to come to naturally, the result was the return to consciousness of the 
patient, and the "I told you so" of the woman who had suggested the 
remedy. 

Well, at ten o'clock we arrived at the station, where we were told that 
accommodations were limited to one cot, and a few blankets that could 
be spread on the floor or the ground, just as the spirit moved. The cot 
we carried to the house of a small store-keeper, and there the lady spent 
the night, not in sleeping, but just as the rest of us did, in fighting 
mosquitoes. Had it not been raining occasionally we would have made 
two small fires on the ground and slept between them, but, as it was, 
we lay down on the porch of a house, and fought the mosquitoes until 
we were almost exhausted. 

Morning came after about two days, and with it the first real meal 
in twenty-four hours, and to say that we felt better is putting it mildly. 
During the day we all had little cat naps, and to some extent repaired 
the ravages of the night before. We remained here until six o'clock, 
when we made another start in the direction of San Luis Potosi. An 
engine had come to our assistance, and we began to think that we would 
get here by the following morning. "The best laid plans," etc., allowed 
us to travel for only half an hour, when the fuel supply (oil) of the 
engine gave out, and we were left on the track about a mile from the 
next station, to which point we walked. Here the little lady of our 
party had some friends who took us in and gave us supper, and after 
some more waiting we started again, and traveled for about half an 
hour more, landing at the regular meal station, where those who had not 



The St. Mary's Muse. 55 

before eaten got their suppers. After this stop we started again, and 
managed to reach the next station, where there was a tank of oil. I did 
not explain that we had been using cross-ties for fuel for the two previous 
runs, so now that the oil assured us of an uninterrupted run, we were 
delighted. Of course this was not a regular fuel station, and the neces- 
sary apparatus was not at hand to fill the engine tank in the short 
time it ordinarily takes for that purpose, but we were happy anyhow, 
and resigned to wait. Well, the fuel oil is very thick, and will not run 
through a pipe except when heated, or under pressure, so the tank was 
filled by hand, using buckets to carry it across from the tank car to the 
tank of the engine, and we stayed there just seven hours by the clock. 
This made it five in the morning of the third day from Tampico, and I 
began to figure that at the rate we were traveling we would arrive in 
San Luis Potosi about the fifth day. Shortly after leaving this last 
stop we arrived at the station where our lady passenger got off to go out 
to her father's sugar plantation. What she had undertaken as a three- 
hour trip had lasted more than two days, and must have been for her 
9. terrible experience, yet she never complained, and never once did we 
look in her direction without meeting a smile that seemd to express her 
confidence that she was safe with us, and she cried not at all. Her 
husband is in the States and she is spending the summer with her father 
at his plantation. 

About eight o'clock we arrived at Rascon where we got some break- 
fast and had another little experience. Through the stupidity of one 
of the trainmen a switch was thrown at the wrong time and a water car 
^as derailed in front of the passenger coaches, and we had to travel 
for a couple of kilometers on the platform of a pile-driving engine until 
we arrived at the river where we had to transfer, for the Rebels had 
destroyed the bridge. We crossed the river in boats, sin noved ad gra- 
cias, and thereafter continued our way uninterruptedly to San Luis Po- 
tosi, where we arrived only forty-eight hours behind time. One very 
principal thing I neglected to mention is, that within the last two hours 
of our run to San Luis we saw two very good Indians hanging to tele- 
graph poles, but I have a suspicion that they cannot keep their present 
postures very long without being spoiled. 



56 The St. Mary's Muse. 



At no time were we in any great danger, though the natives all along 
the road tried to scare us by outlandish stories, and even told us of the 
presence in the vicinity of some desperate character who was not so 
well disposed towards passengers as the man who had held us up. These 
tales and yarns we very properly ascribed to their proper cause, the 
desire to keep us longer with them for the purpose of revenue. 

Barring the one item of mosquitoes, the trip was not one whit worse 
than other trips I have made in this country, and the delay did not mean 
as much to me as it would have meant to some stranger, as I have got 
somewhat used to waiting when anything depends on the natives. 



SCHOOL NEWS 



January 

6. Return from the Holidays. 
12. Rev. Mr. Patton's Address. 
22-24. Mid-year Examinations. 
24. "Statistics." 

20-26. The Rector in Wilmington. 
26-31. "Muse Week." 

29. Dr. Chas. Lee Smith's "Thursday Talk." 
29. Peace-St. Mary's Concert. 
31. Mr. Bowen, "Prestidigitateur." 

After the Holidays 

The 6th of January found practically all gathered again at St. Mary's 
after happy holidays and uneventful return trips. As the holidays 
ended on the 6th, we were too late for the Epiphany celebration of the 
Feast of Lights at St. Augustine's School, an annual event which has 
been a great pleasure for years to changing parties of St. Mary's girls, 
but the frequent singing of the ever cheering "From the Eastern Moun- 
tains" at the Chapel Services tended to keep us reminded of the Epiph- 
any season. 

The approach of the mid-year examinations gave an added emphasis 
to the wisdom of study and served to postpone any special student enter- 
tainment, and the fortnight after the return to duties was for the most 
part quiet, though the little evening dances in Recreation Hour were 



The St. Mary's Muse. 57 

as enjoyable as ever and there was no dearth of visiting and general 
comradeship. 

St. Mary's has rarely enjoyed more delightful January weather, and 
the girls were able to enjoy their basketball, tennis and walking to the 
full, though the Sigmas and the Mus were not able to get ready for 
a match game during the month. 

The examinations, always more dreaded than dreadful came on in due 
time and when approached with boldness were of course completely 
conquered, but still there were many sighs of relief, when the end was 
reached. 

Missionary Tall^s 

Througb a variety of circumstances, we have been fortunate in Janu- 
ary in having at the School for more or less brief visits a number of 
the enthusiastic workers in the present-day missionary movement, and 
their coming has done much to increase the constant interest always felt 
at St. Mary's in the cause. 

On January 10th and 11th there was an important missionary meet- 
ing in Raleigh and one of the special speakers was Rev. R. W. Patton, 
of Atlanta, Secretary for the Fifth Missionary Department of the Board 
of Missions. Mr. Patton was with us for dinner on the evening of the 
12th and afterwards spoke with much impressiveness at the chapel 
service. 

On January 2 6-2 8th a Sunday School Institute of the Diocese of 
North Carolina was held in Henderson, and this was the occasion of 
the visit of Miss Grace Lindley, Associate Secretary of the Woman's 
Auxiliary to the Board of Missions, who visited Raleigh after the In- 
stitute and spent a day at St. Mary's. She much interested the girls 
in her general talk, and later met some of those specially interested 
and arranged for a class in instruction for "Junior Leaders" which will 
be held by Miss Thomas during Lent. 

Following Miss Lindley, on Sunday evening, the 1st of February, 
Miss Annie Cheshire, who has been for the past five years in active work 
in the mission field near Shanghai, China, and who is now on sabbatical 
leave at home, made Sunday evening unusually pleasant by a delightful 
visit and talk to the girls in the school parlor. She came dressed in the 



58 The St. Mary's Muse. 



costume of a Chinese schoolgirl at St. Mary's School, Shanghai, and 
in her charming manner entertained the girls thoroughly, showing them 
a number of interesting Chinese souvenirs and pictures. She also 
sang a number of hymns and chants in Chinese and with her attractive 
personality she won the hearts of all the girls. Aside from being an 
old St. Mary's girl, for she graduated with the class of 1902, Miss 
Cheshire is the daughter of our own bishop, which increases our 
interest in her. 

The Thursday Talks 

Continuing the talks after prayers on Thursday evenings, which were 
much enjoyed during the fall, the Rector spoke again informally on the 
15th and the talk was omitted on the 2 2d in deference to the examina- 
tions. 

On Thursday, the 29th, it was very pleasant to have with us Dr. 
Charles Lee Smith, formerly President of Mercer College, a distin- 
guished citizen of Raleigh who has never allowed his business interests 
to dwarf his interest in educational matters. Dr. Smith talked on 
"The Woman Who Thinks" and his address was of much interest and 
help. 

The New York Artists' Concert Company 

The same evening as Dr. Smith's talk, the 29th, was the occasion 
of the third of this year's series of Peace-St. Mary's concerts. This 
concert was the climax of this season's series and it came up fully to the 
hopes and expectations of all. The ISTew York Artists' Concert Company 
is composed of Miss Laura Combs, soprano ; Miss Florence Hardee, con- 
tralto ; Mr. Frank Ormsby, tenor ; Mr. Frank Martin, bass, and Miss 
Eva Evans, pianist. 

The News and Observer said of this concert: 

The concert rendered by the New York Artists' Concert Company in St. Mary's 
Auditorium last night was a delightful occasion for all those present. It was 
one of the best concerts Raleigh people have had the privilege of hearing this 
season, and it is doubtful if any has been so well received. Solos, by both 
voice and piano, duets and quartets, rendered from a well selected program, 
were each received with prolonged applause and encores. 

The parts by Miss Combs, soprana, and Miss Hardee, contralto, Miss Evans at 
the piano, and the tenor by Mr. Ormsby and bass by Mr. Martin, all deserve 
special mention, but there was no best to it; it was all good. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 59 

The bows by each character were not sufficient to satisfy the audience, com- 
posed of Peace and St. Mary's students, and numbers of people from the city, 
and after the rendition of each selection encore after encore brought forth 
many additional numbers. 

This was one of several of a series of concerts engaged by Peace and St. 
Mary's this season. It was rendered by real artists from a program of the best 
there is in the musical line, and it was a rare pleasure for all those present. 

February 

7. The Dramatic Club in "The Adventures of Lady Ursula." 

13. The Melba-Kubelik Concert. 
14-17. Bishop Bratton's Visit. 

14. University Dramatic Club in "The Magistrate." 

18. Senior Tea to the Faculty. 

19. "Colonial Ball." 

22. Miss Phillips' Recital. 

23. Ash Wednesday — Lent began. 

The Adventure of Lady Ursula 

Miss Davis' training, Elizabeth Tarry as "star," and an interesting 
play combined as they always do to make the evening of February 7th 
one long to be remembered at St. Mary's. The event was the annual 
appearance of the Dramatic Club which under Miss Davis' direction 
presented Anthony Hope's four-act comedy, the Adventure of Lady 
Ursula. 

'The entertainments of the Dramatic Club have always been of great 
interest, and under Miss Davis' direction they have become special fea- 
tures of the school life. "Mice and Men," was the play last year, and 
made a great "hit," and it has been a matter of interest and curiosity 
with those who saw it as to how "The Adventure of Lady Ursula" would 
compare with it. For general interest and fitness as a school play 
it would seem after the event, that "Mice and Men" should have the 
palm, but this year's play requires stronger handling and affords the 
director and the actors a better opportunity to show their powers, an 
opportunity which was fully improved. 

The scene of the play is laid in England about 1760. The costumes 
of the period are always attractive, and those furnished for this pro- 
duction by Waas & Son, of Philadelphia, were especially effective, and 
added much to the enjoyment of the play. 



60 The St. Maey's Muse. 



Elizabeth Tarry, who has increased her reputation at every appear- 
ance in her various parts, was at her best as Lady Ursula and was very 
charming. She divided honors with Elizabeth Garrison, who as the 
hero, Sir George Sylvester, was such a man that the audience forgot she 
was only impersonating. And Virginia Bonner, who starred last com- 
mencement as Shylock, gave another excellent character depiction as 
the Rev. Mr. Blimboe, the English clergyman. 

Nor were the minor parts less well taken. Virginia Davis, making 
her first appearance in a prominent part won much favor as the Earl of 
Hassenden. Adelyn Barbee was a very attractive Miss Dorothy Fenton, 
Lady Ursula's comrade, and Josephine Wilson was warmly received 
as Mrs. Fenton, Dorothy's mother. 

And the account of the play would not be complete without an ex- 
pression of appreciation of the excellence of those pompous and re- 
splendent servants, Quilton (Dorothy Toomer) and Mills (Camelia 
London). Or of the favor with which the audience greeted Mr. Dent, 
when Miss Davis in an emergency filled that part. 

Altogether the Dramatic Club "did itself proud," and "The Adven- 
ture of Lady Ursula" was a great treat. The thanks of the School are 
due to it and its director for the way in which it gave us pride in St. 
Mary's. 

This was the cast : 

Sir George Sylvester Elizabeth Caebison 

Mr. Jack Castleton (his friend) Sudie Huff 

The Earl of Hassenden Virginia Davis 

The Rev. Mr. Blimboe Virginia Bonnes 

Mr. Dent Gertrude Van Straaten 

Sir Robert Clifford f 0fficerg - n the ~\ Agnes Barton 

Mr. Devereux J Foot Guardg I Mabel Cooley 

Mr. Ward (^ ) Julia Cooper 

Quilton (Servant to Lord Hassenden) Dorothy Toomer 

Servant (at Town Lodging) Anna Hodgson 

Mills (Servant to Sir George Sylvester) Camelia London 

Miss Dorothy Fenton Adelyn Barbee 

Mrs. Fenton Josephine Wilson 

The Lady Ursula Barrington Elizabeth Tarry 



The St. Mary's Muse. 61 

Synopsis. 

Act I. — Lord Hassenden's House at Edgware, near London. 
Act II. — Sir George Sylvester's Home in the same village. 
Act III. — Lord Hassenden's Town Lodging, near St. James. 
Act IV. — Sir George Sylvester's. 

The period of the play is about 1760. The action takes place between four 
o'clock in the afternoon of a day in May, and one o'clock the next morning. 

Bishop Bratton's Visit 

The Rt. Rev. Theodore DuBose Bratton, D.D., Bishop of Mississippi, 
the third Rector of St. Mary's School, paid a brief visit to the School 
and was the guest of the present Rector from Saturday afternoon, Feb- 
ruary 14th, to Tuesday morning, February 17th. He was en route 
from a meeting of a committee of the House of Bishops in JSTew York 
to another committee meeting in Atlanta from which point he will re- 
turn to him home at Jackson. 

The Rector and Mrs. Lay gave an informal reception for the friends 
of the Bishop in the school parlor Saturday afternoon and entertained 
the faculty in his honor at the Rectory Monday evening. He preached 
at the Sunday morning service and made an address at the afternoon 
service and Monday afternoon he met the girls in the parlor. 

His visit was a great pleasure to his many friends in Raleigh and at 
St. Mary's and to all those who had the privilege of meeting him during 
his stay. 

Dr. Bratton resigned the Rectorship of St. Mary's eleven years ago 
to accept the bishopric and was consecrated Bishop in Jackson in Sep- 
tember, 1903. His diocese which is largely a missionary one has pros- 
pered greatly under his charge and he has his own "St. Mary's" in All 
Saints College at Vicksburg, which he founded in 1908, and which is 
building slowly on a firm foundation and is at present ably presided 
over by a St. Mary's girl as Principal, Miss Jennie Trapier, of Raleigh, 
a St. Mary's graduate of 1903. 

Bishop Bratton succeeded Dr. Bennett Smedes as Rector of St. Mary's 
in 1899, on the death of Dr. Smedes, the year after the church had 
purchased the school, and during the four years of his Rectorship the 
school grew wonderfully and he left it filled to its capacity. He won 



62 The St. Mart's Muse. 



the unfailing love of his girls and while after ten years those same 
girls are widely scattered, his visit was a special treat to those who are 
still in Raleigh, and it was hard to tell whether they or he the more 
enjoyed the meeting. 

This was Bishop Bratton's first visit to St. Mary's since the com- 
mencement of 1907, when he delivered the Annual Sermon, so it was 
his first meeting with the St. Mary's girls of today, but they are all of 
one accord in hoping that it will be by no means his last. 

The University Dramatic Club 

Last year the University of JSTorth Carolina Dramatic Club visited 
St. Mary's for the first time and was very warmly received in its pre- 
sentation of "What Happened to Jones." This year to the great pleas- 
ure of all of us, St. Mary's was again included in its trip and on Feb- 
ruary 14th the club presented Mr. Arthur Pinero's "The Magistrate" in 
our Auditorium. 

All the members of the company acquited themselves with much credit, 
but Mr. Weeks in the title role and Mr. Kerr, as the Magistrate's wife, 
were especially good. "Cis" was indeed a successful hero and he, like 
Mrs. Poskit, sustained his part very consistently and effectively. The 
play itself was full of comedy which received frequent applause from 
a very appreciative audience. 

We trust that St. Mary's will have many further visits from the 
Chapel Hill Dramatic Club. 

The Seniors to the Faculty 

On Wednesday afternoon, February 18th, from 5 :30 to 6 :30 the 
Seniors entertained the Faculty in the Muse Room which had been 
artistically decorated by them for the occasion. Tea and sandwiches 
were served and the hour passed swiftly in pleasant conversation. The 
Seniors were pronounced charming hostesses by their guests. 

The Colonial Ball 

One of the most unique and delightful occasions of the year was the 
Colonial Ball in honor of Washington's birthday which was given on 
Saturday evening, February 19th. The parlor was transformed into 



The St. Mary's Muse. 63 

an ideal colonial ballroom and at eight- thirty graceful lords and dainty 
ladies of the Revolutionary days were received by no lesser personages 
than George and Martha Washington themselves, in the persons of Julia 
Cooper and Sue Rosemond, while the ladies' wraps were removed by 
that paragon and most pompous of butlers, Emma Bouknight. 

The dancing began with a grand march which the observing and 
observant faculty pronounced one of the prettiest things they had seen 
at St. Mary's. The girls dressed as gentlemen gallantly escorted their 
ladies around, and the ladies with their high powdered hair and quaint 
colonial costumes indeed presented a charming spectacle. After the 
march, favors of flags and hatchets were distributed. 

Then followed charming German figures led by Lanie Hales and 
Laura Margaret Hoppe. After the Virginia reel, the hesitation took 
the place of the minuet, until the time came for the refreshments of 
sherbet and cake. The nine-thirty bell ended one of the most enjoyable 
evenings of the year and all left enthusiastic over the evening and de- 
termined "to have another just like it next year." 

Miss Phillips' Recital 

The third Faculty Recital of the year was given in the Auditoruim 
on Shrove Tuesday evening by Miss Nelly Agatha Phillips. 

Miss Phillips opened her program with the First Movement of Men- 
delssohn's D Minor Concerto, with Miss Isaacs at the second piano. 
Both performers showed a fine conception of the composer's lofty 
thoughts. The second number was a Chopin group beautifully con- 
trasted with the first. Of this group the Preludes, opus 28, numbers 
20 and 7, were received with great applause. Her delicacy of expres- 
sion and charming interpretation proved Miss Phillips a true musi- 
cian. 

A trio by Misses Shull, Rowand and Abbott, a selection from 
"Madame Butterfly," was much enjoyed by all the hearers. The con- 
cert concluded with the Verdi-Liszt Rigoletto Paraphrase. 

A delightful audience pronounced this concert one of the most en- 
joyable and successful of the year. 



64 The St. Maky's Muse. 



MARCH— APRIL— MAY 



Notes of the Present and Future 



Lent 

With the coining of Ash Wednesday the usual Lenten quiet came 
over St. Mary's. The dancing in the evenings ceased until after Easter, 
and the Saturday evenings are given over to quiet fellowship, class meet- 
ings and other equally mild forms of recreation. 

The order of Lenten sendees is the same as in past years. The 
special afternoon voluntary services are held on Wednesdays and Fri- 
days at six o'clock, with brief addresses by the Rector on practical top- 
ics, and evening chapel instead of prayers is held on Tuesday and Fri- 
day evenings. . 

The literary societies, which are now doing some effective work, 
meet during Lent on Wednesday evenings. 

Confirmation 

Bishop Cheshire will make his annual visit to the chapel for Con- 
firmation at the afternoon service on Easter day. 

The Rector is holding the meetings for the preparation for Confirma- 
tion on Sunday evenings at 7 :45 in the chapel. 

The Debates 

For the first time since the inter-society debates were inaugurated 
fourteen years ago there will be a change in the arrangements for them 
this year. With the establishment of the third society, the Alpha Rho, 
it becomes necessary to provide a place for it in the debates, and after 
much consideration it has been decided wisest to have a series of three 
debates instead of the one inter-society debate hitherto held. 

Under this arrangement each of the three societies will debate the 
other two, each society furnishing four debaters. Should one of the 
societies win both of its debates it will hold the undisputed honors of 
the year ; if each society wins one debate the honors will be even. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 65 

The debates will be held in the Auditorium on the dates and with 
the subjects and debaters stated below: 

Epsilon Alpha Pi v. Alpha Rho. 
Resolved, That the movement of organized labor to maintain the closed shop 
should receive the support of the American people. 
Affirmative: Epsilon Alpha Pi — Margaret Bottum, '15, and Eliza Skinner, '15. 
Negative: Alpha Rho — Eliza Davis, '16, and Matilda Hancock, '16. 

Sigma Lambda v. Alpha Roe. 
Resolved, That vocational and industrial education should be dominant in the 
public schools. 
Affirmative: Alpho Rho — Mary Floyd, '16, and Katherine Bourne, '16. 
Negative: Sigma Lambda — Camelia London, '17, and Courtney Crowther, '15. 

Sigma Lambda v. Epsilon Alpha Pi. 
Resolved, That Greek letter faternities are inimical to the best interests of 
American colleges. 
Affirmative: Sigma Lambda — Lanie Hales, '15, and Miriam Reynolds. '17. 
Negative: Epsilon Alpha Pi — Julia Cooper, '14, and Pencie Warren, '15. 

The first debate, that between Epsilon Alpha Pi and Alpha Rho 
will be held on the evening of Saturday, March 28th; the second, be- 
tween the winner of the first debate and Sigma Lamda on Saturday, 
April 4th ; and the third and final debate on the 'Saturday after Easter, 
April 18th. 

The Presidents of the societies for the Easter Term are Margaret 
Bottums, Epsilon Alpha Pi ; Emma Bankright, Sigma Lambda ; and 
Laura Clark^ Alpha Eho. 

The Post Easter Season 

The six weeks between Easter and Commencement will seem short 
indeed and will be filled with all sorts of activities. The operetta, a 
special recital of Miss Davis' Elocution pupils, including the one-act 
play, "The Suffragette" ; a Muse Club play — "Out of Town ;" the inter- 
class parties; etc., in addition to the regular Certificate Recitals, the 
Annual Chorus Concert; etc., are on the tentative program. 

Commencement 

The Commencement dates this year are May 24-26. The speakers 
announced for the special addresses are the Rt. Rev. Cameron Mann, 
Missionary Bishop of Southern Florida, who will preach the annual 



66 The St. Mary's Muse. 



sermon on Commencement Sunday, and Rev. Samuel S. Drury, L.H.D., 
Rector of St. Paul's School, Concord, E". H., who will make the Com- 
mencement day address. 

The Melba-KubeliK Concert 

One of the great events of the year, from a school girl's point of view, 
was the Melba-Kubelik concert given in the Auditorium on the thir- 
teenth of February. 

Notwithstanding the fact that the date was Friday, the thirteenth, 
that the snow was several inches deep and the rain pouring in torrents, 
nearly every seat in the Auditorium was taken. The program included 
numbers by Melba and Kubelik and also by Edmund Burke, the Ca- 
nadian baritone whose singing was received with marked favor and 
enthusiasm, especially his rendering of the Toreador Song from Carmen. 

Madam Melba's singing of the mad scene from Lucia de Lammer- 
moor, the Gounod-Bach Ave Maria, with the violin obligato played by 
Kubelik, and the encores Loste's "Good-bye," "Comin' through the 
Rye," and "Swanee River" were greatly enjoyed. It is only on rare 
occasions that such artists as Kubelik and Melba are heard in ISTorth 
Carolina and the St. Mary's girls feel that they were indeed fortunate 
to have such a privilege granted them. 



Aunt Polly's Advice 



Now ef you's wantin' perfect marks, just git down to work an' make 'em. 

You can put it down as sartin' dat de time is long gone by 

When all dat inspiration use to rain down out de sky. 

Ef you think about it keerfully an' put it to the test, 

You'll diskiver dat de teacher's plan is generally de best. 

Ef you go 'round complainin' at ev'rything in view, 

You'll find on 'vestigation dat de fault is all wid you, 

An' when your lessons git so hard you 'gin to shake and chatter, 

You needn't stan' dar like a fool an' argufy de matter. 

Or when them dreaded quizzes come an' you's feelin' blue, 

Don't walk aroun' an' say there ain't a thing for you to do. 

When you's feelin' dull an' lazy an' your duty you would shirk, 

It's better dan de zeros just to buckle down to work. 

— Selected. 



TKe St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies = = = s = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, In 
the interest of the students and Alumna?, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. raleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1913-1914. 

Lauka Margaret Hoppe,? Editor-in-Chief. 
Julia Allen. Nellie Wood. Margaret Bottum. 

Elizabeth Tarrt. Bessie Badham. Melba McCullers. 

Mart Clark Smith. Josephine V. Smith. Julia Cooper. 

Sallie Hayward, Business Manager. 
Bessie Burdine, Asst. Business Manager. 



EDITORIAL 



The Holidays 

The Christmas vacation was as usual a time of joy for all and the 
reassembling on January 6th was prompt and cheerful. It was a pleas- 
ure to find no one missing except the two or three who were detained 
by sickness and to have with us a number of new girls ready to take 
up their work. 

At this rather late date we extend to each of these newcomers a 
warm welcome, and the best wishes of the Muse that their days at St. 
Mary's may be good for them and for the school. 

The Mid-year Examinations 

The thoughts of most of us turn promptly after the holidays to the 
January examinations, but it is a pleasure to note from year to year a 
lessening of the "dread" which many used to think had necessarily to 
be associated with them. Of course there are still those who hope by 
the few days of "cramming" to make up for months of understudy, but 
most of us have come to see that the examination task is not too difficult 
if we pay the proper attention to the work of each day. 

For all of the "exams" are over once more and we draw a deep breath. 
To those who came through successfully, it was a deej> breath of satis- 
faction. To those who did not do so well, it may have been a regretful 
sigh. May all of us realize that in any case the examinations are not 



68 The St. Mahy's Muse. 



things to trifle with, and may we form the habit of systematic study and 
accomplish something each day. Then how much easier the Finals in 
May will be ! 

The Annual Muse 

With the return after Christmas, the Senior Class and the Muse Club 
take up in earnest the work for the Annual. The plans and prepara- 
tions have been made, the money necessary has been practically all 
raised, the pictures have been, for the most part, taken, and the atten- 
tion is now chiefly to the written material for the book itself. 

Stories, sketches, poetry and, above all, new ideas are what is needed. 
If anyone has suggestions that can be worked up by the editors, they 
will be gladly received. 

We wish to thank each and all for their hearty cooperation thus far 
and hope that it will continue to the end. Remember that this has been 
one of the best years the school has ever known so, in consequence, we 
want to make the 1914 Annual the very best that has ever been pub- 
lished. 

Miss Lee and Mr. Owen 

St. Mary's was very much shocked on February 11th to hear that 
Miss Lee had suffered a serious accident and had been taken to Rex 
Hospital. 

On that morning as she was about to start to the school from her 
home a square away, she slipped on the back steps of her house and 
fractured her hip. Though the fracture set itself and everything has 
gone well with her since, the accident will necessitate her remaining 
on her back in the hospital for eight weeks, a very trying experience 
which she is bearing bravely. Her host of friends look forward with 
much eagerness to her restoration to health and in the meantime are 
most anxious for her recovery. 

During Miss Lee's absence Miss Sutton has charge of her classes in 
the Business Department. 

Mr. Owen was called to the bedside of his mother in Fbwlerville, 
Michigan, on February 27th. Mrs. Owen has been very seriously ill 
for a year and gradually growing worse ; and since Mr. Owen's going 
to her she has had two strokes of paralysis. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 69 



The deep sympathy of all at St. Mary's and his many friends in the 
city go out to him in this time of deep grief. 

Miss Dowd and other of his fellow-teachers are caring for his Voice 
pupils in his absence. 



Personality 



Probably no event of the year has made a deeper impression on the 
school as a whole than Bishop Bratton's visit. An account of his three 
days stay with us is printed elsewhere in this Muse and yet that account 
touches on only the flesh and , blood of the visit, the mere facts, while 
the impress of the visit was the impress of soul. 

Of course even ten years, after his going to his bishopric, present day 
St. Mary's girls who keep up with the traditions of the school, knew 
of the great love that all the girls of his day felt for "Dr. Biratton" and 
of his great personal hold on them, but before his coming the tradition 
was but a tradition. After his coming it became but a natural fact. 

And as if to unconsciously emphasize the great thing with which 
he personally most impressed them, in his Chapel sermon, in his talk 
in the parlor, and in his private conversations with us the one theme 
into which other themes were woven was the Power of Personality. 

Bishop Bratton came on Saturday evening a stranger to most of us 
except his name. When he left us on Tuesday we one and all felt 
that we were bidding Goodspeed to a friend. Such is the power of 
personality. 

The St. Mary's Conference 



Announcement has been made of plans for the Third St. Mary's 
Conference of the Clergy and Laymen of the Carolinas, which will be 
held at the School the first week in June. These Conferences are 
held under the invitation of the Trustees and Rector and the first two 
were considered very successful. 

The published announcement says: 

Plans are now being made for the St. Mary's Conference in the week June 
1st to 6th. These plans which are subject to change are in general as follows: 



70 The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Subjects to ,be presented are Social Service and Religious Education, 
along with a Sunday School Institute. The Rev. William E. Gardner, General 
Secretary of the Board of Religious Education, and the Rev. Frank M. Crouch, 
Secretary of the Commission on Social Service, have promised to provide ad- 
dresses on their respective subjects. Mr. Crouch himself will be present, and 
Mr. Gardner will either come himself, or send the Rev. Lester Bradner. 

The Rev. T. P. Noe suggested the Sunday School Institute and will assist the 
Rector of the School in arranging for it. The Rev. Llewellyn N. Caley has 
promised to come and deliver some of his illustrated lectures in the evening 
and to assist in other ways. Those who have attended previous Conferences 
will be delighted to know that Mr. Caley will be with us this time. 

It is expected that the members of the Conference will arrive on Monday 
night, and leave on Saturday. There will be a service in preparation for the 
Holy Communion on Monday night and the regular sessions of the Conference 
will take place on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Two periods of 
the morning will probably be devoted to Education and Social Service. The 
last period of the morning and one in the afternoon will probably be given up to 
the Sunday School Institute. There will be other hours in the afternoon and 
at night for these subjects and in addition there will be a plenty of free time 
which the members of the Conference can use under their own organization as 
they please. 

The School can accommodate about 175 people for this Conference. Invita- 
tions will be sent out by the Rector to the clergy of North and South Carolina, 
and, after it is known how many of them can come, invitations will be sent to 
laymen and laywomen interested in the above subjects. The Rector would like 
to receive suggestions from the clergy as to what men and women they would 
like to have invited and it will be a pleasure to invite those interested up to 
limit of our accommodations. 

As it is desirable to give the benefit of the Conference to as many as possible, 
preference would naturally be accorded to those who could be present for the 
whole of the session. We therefore hope that those who accept will do so with 
the understanding that they will take full advantage of the opportunities offered, 
inasmuch as an acceptance for a day or two might prevent our inviting some one 
else who could be present the whole time. 

The Executive Committee has very cordially offered the hospitality of the 
School to those who attend the Conference and it will be a pleasure to them and 
to the Rector to welcome those who can come to this Conference. There will 
be no expense of any sort at the Conference itself beyond that incurred in trav- 
eling to and from St. Mary's School. 

Separate school buildings or halls will be assigned to the men and women 
respectively so that all may be comfortably cared for. 

George W. Lay, Rector. 

January 12, 1914. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
Ernest Ckuikshank - - - - Alumnae Editor. 

St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 
Honorary President - - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

HnicnBiBV Vrrv PmrmnrNTB / Mr3> Kate de R - Meares > Wilmington. 

HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS j Mrs _ j M(;K p ittengeri R a]e igh. 

President - Miss Anna N. Buxton. 

Vice-President - Mrs. F. H. Busbee, Raleigh. 

Secretary .... Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 

Treasurer .... Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL 



The Alumnae WorK of the Year 

This has been apparently an "off year" in Alumnae affairs and lit- 
tle has been accomplished or at least reported. There is yet time to 
change this record before Alumnae Day and the Annual Meeting at 
Commencement and we hope that all the interested Alumnae will join 
us in trying to effect the change. 

The definite work undertaken by the Alumnae Association for last 
year was the raising of $1,000 for the Scholarship Fund and this 
work was handily accomplished by commencement. The work under- 
taken this year was the increase of the paid-up membership of the 
Chapters, and of the Association, to 1,000 members. This can be 
accomplished by a little concerted work on the part of all of the Chap- 
ters in the next few weeks. 

Former students of St. Mary's whether graduates or not are eligible 
to regular membership in the Alumnae Association; $1.00 dues paid 
to the local Chapter, if there is a Chapter in the town, or sent direct 
to the Alumnae Treasurer at St. Mary's, constitutes the full charge on 
the pocketbook of the member. And yet, as [ most of these dues find 
their way into the general treasury for the Scholarship Fund, a mem- 
bership of 1,000 for the year, with the voluntary contributions from 
other sources, will go far toward assuring the addition of another 
$1,000 to the Scholarship Endowment. 

Miss Anna Buxton, the Alumnae President, who has been spending 
the winter with her sister in Texas, expects to be at home in April and 
is planning to visit some of the Alumnae Chapters if they would like to 



72 The St. Mart's Muse. 



see her. Letters to her at Winston-Salem will help her with her 
plans. 

The Winston Chapter, Miss Grace Whitaker, Secretary, has for- 
warded its check for $16.25 to the Treasurer, indicating a member- 
ship of 32 in the Chapter. May we hope that May 12th, Alumna? 
Day, will find this first payment of the year multiplied by many other 
Chapters. 



Alumnae Deaths 



In the past month have occurred the deaths of two Alumnse promi- 
nent as St. Mary's girls in their time — Miss Jennie Hughes, of ISTew 
Bern, and Mrs. G. M. Branson, of Greenville, S. C. 

Miss Hughes, who was at St. Mary's in the early eighties, died at the 
home of her sister, Mrs. Edmund Strudwick (ISTannie Hughes), in 
Richmond, with whom she lived. 

Mrs. Brunson (Alice Smallbones, '99, of Wilmington) died at the 
home of her father in Wilmington, where she was on a visit. 



Alumnae Weddings 



The weddings of St. Mary's girls during the coming Easter season 
promise to be of even greater interest than usual, and it is rarely that 
three marriages are of as much general interest to past and present 
St. Mary's as those announced for this April in Raleigh. 

It is announced that on April 15th there will be celebrated the mar- 
riage of Miss Annie Webb Cheshire, youngest daughter of Bishop 
Cheshire, and Dr. A. S. Tucker, younger son of Bishop Tucker, of 
Southern Virginia. 

On April 2 2d Miss Olivia Smith, of Raleigh, and Dr. Aldert Smedes 
Root will be married. 

On April 30th, the third wedding will be that of Miss Annie Gales 
Root and Mr. W. W. Vass, of Raleigh. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 73 

Miss Annie Cheshire is a graduate of St. Mary's, Class of 1903, and 
has been for the past five. years in the mission field at Wusih, China, 
and Dr. Tucker is also in the mission field, being physician-in-charge 
of St. Luke's Hospital, Shanghai. 

Miss Annie Root, also a graduate of 1903, has been very active in 
the work of the St. Mary's Alumnse, and in the social life of the city as 
well, and both as Chairman of the Raleigh Chapter and as Travelling 
Secretary of the Alumna? Association did effective work for the 
Alumnse. Mr. ,Vass, who is a banker, is also closely connected with. 
St. Mary's interests, his sister, Miss Eleanor Vass, being a St. Mary's 
graduate. 

The grandfather of Dr. Aldert Smecles Root and of Miss Annie 
Root was Dr. Aldert Smedes, the Founder and First Rector of St. 
Mary's, and their parents, Mr. Charles Root and Mrs. Annie Smedes 
Root, have ever been intimately interested in and associated with the 
life of the School. 

Miss Olivia Smith, while not a graduate, was for a number years 
a St. Mary's girl and is possibly the best known of all to the St. Mary's 
girls of the present. 

The Muse extends congratulations to all. 



The Coming White House Wedding 

The announcement of the approaching wedding of Miss Eleanor 
Wilson to Secretary McAdoo is naturally of much interest to all those 
associated with St. Mary's. 

The New York Times says of Miss Wilson : 

Miss Eleanor Wilson is tall and dark, unlike her sisters, Mrs. Francis B. 
Sayre and Miss Margaret Wilson. She is fond of society and has many friends 
in Washington outside of the Administration circle. She is a good dancer. 
Mr. McAdoo has been her most frequent dancing partner at the informal dances 
of the Chevy Chase Club. She has recently joined the Riding and Hunt Club 
and follows the hounds. 

Miss Wilson was educated in private schools at Princeton and then spent 
two years in St. Mary's College at Raleigh, N. C, of which the President was 
Dr. McNeely Dubose, whose wife was an intimate friend of Mrs. Wilson. She 



74 The St. Mary's Muse. 



had acquired a taste for painting from her mother, and spent two years, after 
leaving St. Mary's, in studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia. 

Miss Wilson has had some experience with civil war in Mexico. In January, 
1912, she was a visitor with the family of Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Hutching of the 
Madera Lumber Company, at their home near Madera, in the State of Chihua- 
hua, where she joined several hunting parties after big game in the Sierra 
Madre. While she was there the rebels rose against the Madero Government. 
Madera, which was a rebel stronghold, was taken by the Government forces, 
and Miss Wilson was detained there for several days. Covered with alkali dust, 
wrapped in a Mexican variegated serape, which she had received from an insur- 
recto officer, she arrived at El Paso on February 25th, after having been released 
from detention at Madera. 

The wedding will be the fourteenth celebrated at the White House. The 
thirteenth was the marriage of Miss Jessie Woodrow Wilson to Francis Boyes 
Sayre on November 25, 1913. 

One of Miss Wilson's companions on the Mexican trip was Miss 
Nellie Kintner, of Buffalo, a schoolmate of hers at St. Mary's. 



READ !— MARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

Readyto-Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls 

Wilt Jf asfyton Fa ^ 



£Fsxruxx£& 




r- Exclusive 
]| Millinery 



We shall be glad to receive your subscription to 

THE ANNUAL MUSE 

$3.00 

Ready on Class Day, May 25th 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 




the store of quality 

Dry Goods 

OF ALI, KINDS 


" It's worth the difference " 


MILLINERY 


THE TYREE STUDIO 


TTJyJJ^^^P 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 
tains, Draperies, etc. 


" Workers in Artistic Photography " 


LADIES' FINE SHOES «© SLIPPERS 





Advertisements. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store. 



ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 
DAY AND EVENING DRESSES 

WE SELL GOSSARD'S LACE 
FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

C ANDY — CHINA — TOTS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



COMING NUMBERS OF THE MUSE. 



March 30 
April 6 
April 13 
April 20 



Tenth Anniversary and Easter Number. 
Sixth Alumnae Number. 
St. Mary's Girl Number. 
Post-Easter News Number. 



Why Is 




Brantley's Fountain 

The 

MOST POPULAR? 


BOYLAN^PEARCE CO. 
The Greatest Store in the City 

FOR THE 

SCHOOL GIRLS 


Ask the Girls 





! 



Advertisements. 



STATIONERY 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King-Crowell 
Bell Phone 135 

The Southern Educational Bureau 

EALEIGH, N. C. 

Twenty-two years successful experience securing 
desirable teachers for schools and colleges and 
placing competent teachers in satisfactory posi- 
tions. 

CONSERVATIVE AND CONFIDENTIAL 

C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones: 



174 
226 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

No. 1 28 Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

H. STEINMETZ FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets , 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants . 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



TALK. 

Talk about opera, music and art, 

Talk about books if you must, 
Talk of the tariff until men depart, 

And talk of the ways of a trust; 
Talk about fishing for pickerel and bass, 

And talk, if you will, about pelf, 
Talk about people you see as you pass, 

Talk of anything else but yourself. 

— Detroit Free Press. 



KING'S GROCERY 


J\M 


WALKOVER 

The Shoe for You 


"The Little Store" 


fill 


WALK-OVER SHOE SHOP 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 




HERBERT ROSENTHAL 


GYMNASIUM SHOES 




Ladies' Fine Shoes 



Advertisements. 



S. G LASS THE LADIES' STORE 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses, and 

Children. Ready-made wearing apparel. 
210 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

SHOES! WHOSE? 

POOL & CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 

Best Companies Represented, Bonding Solicited 
The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. G. 

YOUNG & HUGHES 

Plumbers, Steam Fitters, 

Hot Water Heating 
S. Wilmington Street 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 

ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary. 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS SUITS, MILLINERY AND SHOES 

208 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. G. 



GREAT SCOTT! 

If Ivanhoed the bonny brae, 
And Athelstaned his tunic new, 

If Friar Tucked the food away, 
Pray what, oh what, did Roderick Dhu? 



-Old Favorite. 



. ROSENTHAL 
SCO. 

GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 

Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
The Wake Drug Store. Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 


HICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys Bicycle Supplies 

Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


CREAM 
Phone 123 Cor. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 


DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 

PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 


T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY. Mail orders solicited 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


12 W. Hargett St. 


Good Things Always at 


RALEIGH FLORAL COMPANY 


BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 


Saunders Street 


Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 




HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 





REVISED. 

Of all glad words 
That now are roared, 

The gladdest are these: 
"He works for Ford." 



— Detroit Free Press. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 



New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

NORFOLK »™ L £«» 

iiwiil wuu GOLDSBORO 

Via WASHINGTON. KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FAEMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



w. w. croxton. 

Traffic Manager, NORFOLK, VA. 



C. W. UPCHURCH, 

General Agent, RALEIGH. N. C. 



Advertisements. 









ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


RALEIGH, n. c. 
Everything in Art 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 


TOYLAND 


MILLINERY 


China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishings 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 


WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 
Picture Frames and Window Shades 


* 


HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 


Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 
CARVER'S STABLES 


Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
1 18 E. Davie Street Raleigh N. C. 


ROYSTER'S CANDY 

Made Fresh Every Day 


GRIMES & VASS Raleigh. N. C. 
Fire Insurance and Investments 


Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 



A WISH. 

I have no faith in mystic signs 
As harbingers of good or ills; 

But one sign I would like to see 
On letter boxes: Post No Bills. 



C. D. ARTHUR 
Fish and Oysters 
CITY MARKET 



MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 E. Harg-ett Street 



JOHN C. DREWRY 
" MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE " 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell & O'Kelly, Proprietors 

204 S. Salisbury Street 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 

Fayetteville Street . 



J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 

MEATS OF ALL KINDS 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 Franklin Street CHICAGO 

Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 

MRS. FRANK REDFORD 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 

PERRY'S ART STORE 

S. Wilmington Street 



Advertisements 



It Happened in the Dictionary 

A Zouave with a zebra, 

On a zero night in June, 
Wooed a Zulu on a zebu, 

'Neath a zingaroguish moon; 
In his zeal he strummed a zither, 

Called as witness Mister Zeus, 
As he told his Zulu Lulu 

That he loved her like the deuce. 

"You're a zany," she retorted, 

"For your name begins with Z, 
There's another zone for lovers 

That look's very good to me"; 
Then the zebu zig-zagged onward, 

Left the Zouave in a daze, 
While the fickle Zulu maiden 

Sought a husband in the A's. 

— H. 8. Ha skins in Life. 



SOUTHERN RAILWAY 



Premier Carrier of the South 

Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars to San 
Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tickets on sale to 
principal Western points. Convenient local, as well as through trains 
Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining Car Service on all through 
trains. Ask Representatives of Southern Pailway about special rates ac- 
count Christmas holidays; also about various other special occasions. If 
you are contemplating a trip to any point, communicate with representa- 
tives of Southern Railway before completing your arrangements for same. 
They will gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to 
the cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you. 

H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, J. O. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 



! 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



{for girls and young women) 



72d ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 18, 1913. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 22, 1914. 



St. Mary's 

offers instruction in these 
Departments : 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
A. THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 



In 1912-13 were enrolled 290 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-eight Members of the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Thirty-six 
Pianos. New Gymnasium, Dining Hall and Dormitories. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian side of Education unthout slight to the 
Scholastic training. 



For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. George W. Lay, 



Rector. 



Caster JHumfoet 



Spril, 1914 



ftt jWarp's Jfluse 



> W*A»* ^*»'» 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

EASTER NUMBER 
Vol. XYIII. April, 1914. No. 5. 



The day of resurrection! 

Earth, tell it out abroad; 
The Passover of gladness, 

The Passover of God. 
From death to life eternal, 

From earth unto the sky, 
Our Christ hath brought us over 

With hymns of victory. 

Our hearts be pure from evil, 

That we may see aright 
The Lord in rays eternal 

Of resurrection-light; 
And, listening to His accents, 

May hear so calm and plain 
His own "All hail," and hearing, 

May raise the victor strain. 

Now let the heavens be joyful, 

Let earth her song begin, 
The round world keep high triumph, 

And all that is therein; 
Let all things seen and unseen 

Their notes together blend, 
For Christ the Lord is risen, 

Our joy that hath no end. 

Greek Hymn; tr. J. M. Neale, 1862. 



An Easter Day at St. Mary's 



An Everyday Sketch. 



There is a subdued hurry and noise as all make haste to gather for 
the early service. Then in quiet order the long line dressed in simple 
white moves slowly to the Chapel. The note of our Easter Day is 
struck by the opening service ; the tang of the fresh morning air is re- 



His Violin 



Elsie Alexander. 



Piedro had just had a stormy scene with Signeur Maranelli. As 
he left the studio, the signeur stuck his head out the door, and said in 
his soft Italian voice, to the rapidly disappearing figure, "Your touch is 
excellent, but you haven't your soul in your music," and as he closed 
the door, "His touch is wonderful, my! how he can make his violin 
sing — but he is young, and when he has had love and sorrow — Ah ! he 
has great future, for he has the soul of a genius." 

When Piedro left the studio, his brow was clouded, and his dark 
brown eyes concealed smouldering fires, for his dearest hope had been 
blasted. Spasmodically he clutched his beloved violin, and trudged on- 



78 The St. Maky's Muse. 

fleeted in the bright yet reverent faces of the girls as they march up the 
aisle singing heartily of the gladness of "The Day of Eesurrection," 
and the solemn Communion Office has a meaning and a message to be 
realized anew and received with a joy that is a benediction, filling the 
hearts of all those gathered in one close fellowship at the altar rail of 
the dearly loved Chapel. 

Then, after the morning meal, the final decorations in the Chapel 
are put in place, and by the eleven o'clock service, the chancel seems 
a bit of flowery woodland, white with dogwood blooms varied by the 
sunny brightness of daffodils. And how full of the triumphant note 
of victory sound the young voices both now and at the evening service 
as they ring out the glad strains of the Easter hymns and the exultant 
closing verses of the anthems — anthems that begin in quiet tones to 
sing of the grief of those devoted women who "as it began to dawn" on 
that first Easter went to do reverence to the Master who they thought 
had been taken away from them forever. 

Then comes the close of the sweet solemn day, and the Grove is alive 
with girls talking of how filled with joy the day had been and of how 
truly and lastingly do they love St. Mary's and St. Mary's Chapel and 
all the dear and holy Associations of such festivals as this happy Easter 
Day. E. W. T. 



The 'St. Mary's Muse. 79 

ward. One could look at his hands and tell that he was a violinist; 
long, slender, tapering fingers ; an expressive hand : the hand of the 
born musician. 

He went straight to his little room, and in a few minutes, when his 
old aunt, with whom he lived, entered, he said, "It's no use trying, 
Auntie ; you know how I have worked on that last piece that the signeur 
gave me, and I thought I played it well, but the signeur said that my 
playing wasn't expressive enough, and we had a scene and — I'm not go- 
ing to take any more lessons." The old Italian woman tried to soothe 
him, but the wound was deeper than she had suspected, and her words 
had no effect. She knew his impulsive Italian nature, and she did not 
wish him to be discouraged, for his playing was wonderful — she knew 
that. "Lionga stopped, on her way home from the olive groves, and 
asked how you had succeeded with the Signeur." 

In a flash, Piedro was up, and planting a hasty kiss on the faded 
cheek, he directed his steps towards Lionga's house. 

As Lionga sat on her tiny porch in the restful twilight, she beheld 
the familiar figure of Piedro approaching, and her heart gave a throb 
of joy, but as he drew nearer, she saw by his lagging step and down- 
cast air, that he did not bring good news. With a sigh he flung him- 
self beside her. "Lionga," he said, his voice trembling with passion 
and tenderness, "I have had my last violin lesson, and I have decided 
to keep on working in the olive groves, and maybe I'll be overseer some 
day. Lionga, you already know that I love you, we have already 
waited long enough, now can't we get married and live with Aunt 
Poena ?" Quickly the little maiden arose, and her words fell clear and 
distinct on the still air. ""No, Piedro Varoni, no, I won't marry you. 
Do you think that I would marry a man who is so much of a coward 
that he gives up a thing just because he can't get it, without any work. 
Go !" The utter scorn in her words cut him like a knife. Piedro 
gave her one parting look and with his cap in his hand, he silently 
stepped out into the dusk, and in a few moments, had disappeared. 

When he returned, there was a wild look in his eyes, and his pale 
cheeks were flushed. His old aunt knew that he was brooding. 

As the days went by, Piedro would sit and mope for hours ; he never 
went to see his little dark-eyed love Lionga, any more, after his return 



80 The St. Maky's Muse. 



from his labours in the olive groves; and stranger still, his beloved 
violin lay untouched. 

Day by day he grew paler and paler, until at last, his old aunt called 
in the doctor. After examining him thoroughly the doctor said, "It's 
a case of melancholia. The boy has been brooding and if he doesn't 
take a decided turn for the better, he won't live." After this, Piedro 
was confined to his bed, almost entirely. 

One day just about dusk, the boy summoned his old aunt to his bed- 
side. "Aunty," he said, "please send for the Signeur and — Lionga." 
Hastily the old woman obeyed his request, and within a short while the 
famous Signeur and the little olive-skinned Lionga were at his bedside. 
Without any word of greeting to either one, he said, "Give me my vio- 
lin, and as he grasped his beloved instrument with his long, tapering 
fingers, a look of inexpressible joy lit his pale face and as he drew 
his bow across the strings, lo ! the strains were divine. With his eyes 
riveted on Lionga's face, he played and the signeur stood entranced. 
The violin sang of joy, of sorrow, of passion, and throbbed with exquisite 
pain, and as the last strain ceased, a look of unearthly joy flitted across 
his face, and the divine strains died away, with the life of the master 
who had given them birth. And Lionga and the signeur with bared 
head stood in the presence of death, and the signeur realized that a 
genius had departed into the great beyond. 



After Many Years 



Beatrice Massey. 



The light that shone into the curio shop was so dim that only the 
bronze Buddha vase was clearly to be seen ; the shelves, rising tier upon 
tier along the walls and laden with Eastern cloths, seemed but so many 
dusky reflections of the gloom. Whiffs of hot air came through the 
overshadowed doorway and mingled with the scent of spice. The at- 
mosphere of the place filled the throat with a dry warmth. 

The man and the woman standing amid the shadows were conscious 
of it, but with a differing consciousness. The man breathed it as the 
necessary breath of existence, the woman felt stifled and oppressed. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 81 

She moved and the costly material of her skirt rustled against the un- 
covered floor. Her figure seemed almost incongruous in such a scene, 
for her dress swept around her in rich folds and her hat drooped over 
her face in a wide, extravagant curve. It was the dress that three 
great artists had made famous, and that the world knew by heart, but 
to the pale, pinched man in the shop she was a gorgeous butterfly, that 
poising itself for a moment in the darkness, would presently flit away 
into the sun. 

"And this?" she said, her hand resting on the dark vase. "That is 
Chinese," he said in his peculiar voice. "We have had it for ten years. 
It is very old, two hundred years old — perhaps more. We prize it 
very much. "Indeed," she said, her voice was low but she did not 
move her hand. He watched her uneasily. "It is not for sale," he 
said. "And why ?" She kept her face averted and touched the bronze 
dragon that guarded the top of the vase. "Everything in a shop is 
usually for sale." The man smiled curiously. 

"Shops," he said, "like other things, differ." At the tone of her 
words, half foolish, half solemn, her mind sprang back into the past. 
A picture partly remembered, never wholly cast aside, shot into the 
life of knowledge and a sharp unexpected pain went through her heart. 

"And your master," she said hesitatingly, "he still lives ?" 

A flash of surprise lit the man's eyes, then passed. He was too sim- 
ple to question a woman's pleasure. Besides his master had been 
well known once, and had known many of the great world. "My mas- 
ter has been paralyzed," he said, "these ten years back. He has been 
helpless since his misfortune ; when hope is taken, life may go as well. 
The two are one." This man with his pale face and deformed body 
was an untaught philosopher. There are many such in the workshops 
of God. 

"Tell me of him," she said. Her voice was very low. People said 
that on the stage her words could thrill a man's soul ; but no audience 
had ever heard her speak as she spoke now. 

For a long time he hesitated ; then looked up. Even in the shadow, 
the pathos and fidelity in his eyes made them shine like lamps. "I sel- 
dom mention him," he said, "but if you wish it ?" "Yes," she urged ; 
"Yes." "Ten years ago the master had a daughter." 



82 The St. Maky's Muse. 



The woman moved slightly. "Well," she said ; "Well ?" 

He bent his head. "She was the stars and the sun and the world to 
him — and to me," he said simply. "But we, we were like the things," 
he moved his hands comprehensively, "dusty and gloomy and dull to 
one so bright. She had a face like heaven and earth sees so little of 
heaven that it must take all it can. One morning we found her gone." 

There was silence in the street, and it seemed that all life had 
clogged its wheels and that only the man with his pitiful deformity and 
half-poetic words breathed. 
"But he lives!" she whispered. "You said that he still lives!" 

"I found him on that morning lying by the shop door. For hours I 
thought he was dead, but the doctor came and said he must look to 
time for his recovery. Time," he smiled sadly. "Death would have 
been an easier word." 

Her skirt rustled again upon the bare floor and she drew her breath 
with a catch. "Tell me more," she said, "everything." 

"For years he lay like a log and never spoke. Then one day his 
voice came back and his first words were, 'Where is Anna V It was 
the hardest hour of my life." His voice ceased, and she clasped her 
hands fiercely ; tears were dropping upon them like rain. "Every day 
since then I have had to suffer the same words. He never fails, he 
never forgets. It is always, always the same. 'Has she come yet? 
When will she come?' " 

"And you ? You ?" Her voice was a mere echo of itself. He 
laughed, but there was no bitterness in the laugh, and no mirth. 

"I, well I have seen the stars and the sun, and I, too, remember. 
God has made me different from other men, I may not claim what they 
can claim. But I have a life of my own to give away. Perhaps I 
have given it foolishly, but I am content." 

He had forgotten the presence of a stranger, forgotten the hour, the 
place, everything except the ideal, perfect in its entire hopelessness, and 
that had been the light in his patient life. And the woman standing in 
the maze of his dreams, saw the long procession of her life stream 
slowly past ; saw the triumphs, the friends, the loves that make up the 
world's career; and above them as a beacon above the restless sea, the 
entire devotion of one life, true and steadfast as the creed of hope. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 83 

The man's back was turned and the miracle of such a soul in such a 
body swelled her heart in a great flood. 

With a gesture finer than any that had made her fame, she stretched 
out her hands. "Johann !" she said softly, "Johann ! Anna has come." 



SCHOOL NEWS 



The Lenten Services 

The special Lenten services, with their shortened Evening Prayer 
and a short talk by the Rector, have been a feature of this Lent at St. 
Mary's as in the past. These services last from six to half-past six on 
Wednesday and Friday evenings and are voluntary. This year the 
Rector was able to be present and make all the addresses but one, when, 
in his absence, the Rev. M. A. Barber of Christ Church filled his 
place. 

The Rector's talks this Lent have been, as usual, clear and direct and 
on practical subjects and the constantly good attendance attested the 
appreciation of the girls and the helpfulness of the addresses. Espe- 
cially stimulating were the talks on "Prayer," "The Hatefulness of 
Sin," and "Self-Discipline," while in the latter part of Lent the series 
of talks on the Beatitudes gave a clearer understanding of those famil- 
iar verses, and the thoughts in them so especially appropriate for Lent. 

During Holy Week there was daily Early Communion, except on 
Good Friday, and daily services at six, at which time the Rector fol- 
lowed briefly each day the events and teachings of the corresponding 
day commemorated. 

On Easter Even the Rite of Baptism was administered in prepara- 
tion for the Confirmation Service on Easter Day. At the Easter Even 
Service Annie Budd was baptized. 

The Inter-Society Debates 

The annual Inter-Society Debate has been for years one of the most 
exciting and interesting occasions of the year, and it was a question 
this year before the event whether the multiplication of the debates 
from one to three would add to or detract from the interest. 



84 The- St. Mary's Muse. 



As usual, all was fairly quiet except for the work of the debaters until 
the week before the first debate; but then with the flashing of ribbons 
and pennants and the discussion of the merits of the champions of the 
several societies things promptly assumed their normal aspect, and Sat- 
urday evening found the debaters confronted by an audience certainly 
no less enthusiastic than the most enthusiastic of former years. 

This year marked the first appearance of the Alpha Rho Society 
in the debates. A year ago the increased size of the School made it 
seem expedient to add a third society, but it was understood that this 
third society should not contest in the debates until this year. To meet 
the changed condition it was decided to have the loser of last year's 
debate meet the Alpha Rho debaters in the first debate of this year ; the 
loser of this first debate meet Sigma Lambda in the second debate ; and 
the winners of the first debate contend with Sigma Lambda in the final 
debate of the series. The debates were to take place on three successive 
Saturday nights in Lent but, being delayed, the third debate had to be 
deferred until the Saturday night after Easter. 

first Debate 
Epsilon Alpha Pi vs. Alpha Rho. 

On March 28th after an active afternoon on the part of the Mar- 
shals who had charge of the decorations, the Auditorium looked its 
best when at 8:15 promptly the debaters appeared and took their places. 
Epsilon Alpha Pi had the right side of the stage and Auditorium and 
Alpha Rho the left, the green and gold of the one in pleasant contrast 
with the maroon and gray of the other. In the neutral ground — the 
middle section — the judges and the few Sigma Lambda's who wished 
to be considered "on the fence" found themselves more or less lonely. 

Following the precedent of last year, Miss Emma Bouknight, Presi- 
dent of the Sigma Lambda Society, presided and announced the sub- 
ject: 

Resolved, That the movement of organized labor to maintain the 
closed shop should receive the support of the American people. 

Epsilon Alpha Pi, represented by Margaret Bottum, '15, and Eliza 
Skinner, '15, had the Affirmative; while Alpha Rho, represented by 
Eliza Davis, '16, and Matilda Hancock, '16, upheld the Negative. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 85 

All the debaters acquitted themselves creditably and showed careful 
study of the question but the burden of the Affirmative was too much 
for the Epsilon Alpha Pi debaters and honors were easy for Alpha Rho. 
The judges were Prof. William B. Camp of A. & M. College, Rev. 
E. H. Goold of St. Augustine's School, and Mr. G-. B. Phillips of the 
Raleigh High School. 

Second Debate 
Sigma Lambda vs. Epsilon Alpha Pi. 

As a consequence of Alpha Rho's victory, the older societies met in 
the second debate. It was generally conceded that the sides of the 
question in this debate were more even and the subject was more inter- 
esting to the St. Mary's audience, while interest had naturally quick- 
ened during the week. So the air was tense with excitement when on 
April 4th Sigma Lambda met Epsilon Alpha Pi. This time the deco- 
rations showed the contrast between the purple and gray and the green 
and gold, and Miss Laura Clark, President of the Alpha Rho, presided. 

The question was : 

Resolved, That Greek letter fraternities are inimical to the best in- 
terests of American colleges. 

This time Sigma Lambda had the affirmative, defended by Lanie 
Hales, '15, and Miriam Reynolds, '17, and Epsilon Alpha Pi upheld 
the negative, with Julia Cooper, '14, and Pencie Warren, '15, as her 
representatives. 

The debate ran very evenly and again all the debaters acquitted 
themselves with much credit, but again the negative proved the better 
side and the judges — Prof. W. A. Withers, Prof. George Summey, Jr., 
and Mr. J. W. Pratt, all of A. & M. College — awarded the debate to 
Epsilon Alpha Pi by a two-to-one decision. 

Possibly the excitement that followed the decision was of as much 
interest as the debate itself. It was the first taste of victory Epsilon 
Alpha Pi had had in five years, while the followers of Sigma Lambda 
always "die hard." But no hard feelings were engendered. 



86 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Third Debate 

Sigma Lambda vs. Alpha Rho. 

The final debate of the series is scheduled for the Saturday in Easter 
Week and both societies are on their mettle. A victory for Sigma 
Lambda will mean a draw among the societies, each having a victory 
and a defeat; a victory for Alpho Rho will mean that that society has 
the undisputed debating honors of the year. 

The subject is : 

Resolved, That vocational and industrial education should he domi- 
nant in the 'public schools. 

The negative side won in the two previous debates and this time 
Sigma Lambda has the negative, but the debaters for both sides are 
worthy representatives. For Alpha Rho, Mary Floyd, '16, and Kath- 
erine Bourne, '16, will debate; while Sigma Lambda will be represented 
by Camelia London, '17, and Courtney Crowther, '15. Miss Margaret 
Bottum, President of Epsilon Alpha Pi, will preside. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Blinn Owen 

The announcement that Mr. and Mrs. Blinn Owen would be at home 
in West Raleigh on March 29th and thereafter, came as a great surprise 
to all St. Mary's, but it was a very agreeable surprise and occasioned 
much pleasure. 

Mr. Owen, who was planning to be married the coming summer, 
though the event had not been announced, was called from St. Mary's 
in February to be with his mother who was desperately ill at her home 
in Michigan. His mother becoming somewhat better, it was decided 
best to move her to Raleigh, and at Washington, D. C, the party 
met the bride-to-be, and the marriage was celebrated. Mrs. Owen 
Sr., stood the long trip very well and while still in a critical condition 
is holding her own. The Owens are making their home at present with 
Mrs. and Miss Dowd in West Raleigh. 

Mrs. Owen, Jr., who was Miss Mabel Sells, has been spending the 
present winter in ISTew York continuing her studies in voice. She and 
Mr. Owen became acquainted last summer when both of them were 
with Mr. Ellison Van Hoose at his Music Camp, "Melody Lodge," in 
the Adirondacks. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 87 

The Commencement Marshals 

The Commencement Marshals, conspicuous figures in their regalias 
of blue and white, at the School functions from Easter to Commence- 
ment, and who are selected chiefly from the Junior Class by the literary 
societies, will be headed this year by Elizabeth Tarry of the Alpha Rho 
Society, than whom there could have been no more fitting or popular 
choice. 

The Marshals as chosen are: Alpho Rho — Elizabeth Tarry, Chief; 
Matilda Hancock and Elizabeth Pritchett; Sigma Lambda — Lanie 
Hales and Bessie Badham; Epsilon Alpha Pi — Helen Peoples and 
Winifred Rogers. 

The Annual Muse 

The details with regard to the publication of the 1914 Muse 
are now about complete and the managers promise the most attractive 
year-book gotten out, which we think is a fairly difficult promise to ful- 
fill. The book as usual will contain new features and differ in some 
respects in make-up, including size, from past Muses, but the general 
plan is the same. 

The annual Muse will be issued as usual on Class Day in Commence- 
ment. It is gotten out by the Muse Club, and is this year, as hereto- 
fore, from the plant of the Edwards and Broughton Printing Company, 
of Raleigh. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN-OLD FRIENDS 



Stately Verse 

'If Mary goes far out to see, 
By wayward breezes fanned, 

I'd like to know — can you tell me? — 
Just where would Mary land. 

'If Tenny went high up in air, 
And looked o'er land and lea, 

Looked here and there and everywhere 
Pray what would Tennessee? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"I looked out of the window and 

Saw Orry on the lawn; 
He's not there now, and who can tell 
Just where has Oregon? 

"Two girls were quarreling one day 

With garden tools, and so 
I said, 'My dears, let Mary rake 
And just let Idaho. 

'A friend of mine lived in a flat 

With half a dozen boys; 
When he fell ill I asked him why 

He said 'I'm Illinois.' 

'An English lady had a steed, 

She called him 'Ighland Bay,' 
She rode for exercise, and thus 
Rhode Island every day." 

—Life. 



A Lay of Ancient Rome 

the Roman was a rogue, 
He erat, was you bettum, 
He ran his automobilis 
And smoked his cigarettum; 
He wore a diamond studibus, 
An elegant cravattum, 
A maxima cum laude shirt, 
And such a stylish hattum. 

He loved the luscious hie, haec, hoc, 

And bet on games and equi; 

At times he won — at others though 

He got it in the nequi. 

He winked qiiousque tandem 

At puellas on the Forum 

And sometimes even made 

Those goo-goo oculorum. 

He frequently was seen 
At combats gladiatoral; 
And ate enough to feed 
Ten boarders at Memorial. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 89 

He often went on sprees, 

And said on starting homus, 

"Hie labor opus est, 

Oh where's my hie — hie domus." 

Although he lived in Rome, 

Of all the arts the middle 

He was — 'xcuse the phrase — 

A horrid individ'l. 

Ah, what a different thing 

Was homo, dativ homini 

Of far away B. C. 

Prom us of Anno Domini. 

— Harvard Lampoon. 



Impertinent 

An impudent fellow in Hawarden 

Inquired, without asking his pawarden, 

Of the learned Colquhoun if the man in the mquhoun 

Always lodged in some nobleman's gawarden? 

Whereupon the fire-eating Lord Cholmondeley, 

Overhearing the words, remarked grolmondeley, 

To an awe-stricken neighbor, unsheathing his neighbor, 

That the question was beastly uncolmondeley. 

— Life. 



TKe St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year = = = s One Dollar. 

Single Copies = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in 
the interest of the students and Alumnae, under the editorial management of the Muse Club. 
Address all communications and send all subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. baleigh, n. c. 

EDITORIAL STAFF 1913-1914. 

Laura Margaret Hoppe, Editor-in-Chief. 
Julia Allen. Nellie Wood. Margaret Bottum. 

Elizabeth Tarry. Bessie Badham. Melba McCullers. 

Mary Clark Smith. Josephine V. Smith. Julia Cooper. 

Sallie Hayward, Business Manager. 
Bessie Burdine, Asst. Business Manager. 

EDITORIAL 



Easter 



Once more the Spring of the year has come around to us. Lent, 
with its peace and quiet, has passed and we have arrived at the "glad- 
some Eastertide," the most beautiful of all seasons at St. Mary's. From 
the sweet and solemn early morning service, with its glad rejoicing 
hymns, through the day until the close of evening service at twilight, 
a joyousness pervades all. Inside, the Chapel is filled with the per- 
fume of white flowers and the high girlish voices of the choir chanting 
Easter hymns. Outside, nature is bursting into new life and the whole 
w^orld seems to be starting out afresh, giving us all inspiration to join in 
with those happy voices singing — 

"Lift up, lift up your voices now! 
The whole wide world rejoices now: 
The Lord hath triumphed gloriously, 
The Lord shall reign victoriously!" 



Miss Lee 



Her very many friends are delighted to have word that Miss Lee's 
condition has so much improved that she will be able to leave Rex Hos- 
pital and go to her home on Boylan Avenue for Easter. Her stay at 



The St. Mary's Muse. 91 

the hospital has been a long and tiresome one, extending over more than 
eight weeks, but her progress while slow has been entirely satisfactory 
and she expects to be quite her old self by the close of the session. She 
will hardly be able to resume her work in full during the present 
session. 



The Weddings in the Chapel 

The Chapel has been the scene of a number of St. Mary's weddings 
in the fifty years since it was built but the last one dates back now 
about a quarter century, so that the two weddings which are to be cele- 
brated there this April are of very special interest. 

On the Wednesday in Easter Week at 7 :30 p. m., the marriage of 
Miss Annie Webb Cheshire and Dr. Augustin S. Tucker will be cele- 
brated, the fathers of the bride and bridegroom, Bishop Cheshire of 
North Carolina and Bishop Tucker of Southern Virginia, officiating. 

On Thursday, April 30th, the marriage of Miss Annie Gales Root 
and Mr. William W. Vass will be celebrated in the Chapel. 

Both Miss Annie Cheshire and Miss Annie Root, in person and 
through their families, have been so closely associated with St. Mary's 
throughout their lives that it is especially fitting that they should be 
married in the Chapel which means so much to all St. Mary's girls, 
while the fact that after their marriage Dr. and Mrs. Tucker go back 
to the mission field in China, where he is physician-in-charge of St. 
Luke's Hospital, Shanghai, while Mr. and Mrs. Vass will continue to 
make their home in Raleigh is typical of the range of St. Mary's girls 
near and far for their lives and life-work. 



The 1914 "Statistics" 

The taking of the "Statistics" for the Annual Muse is always an 
event of excitement and interest and this year was no exception. The 
same method was used in making the selections, that is the girls gathered 
in the School Room on "Statistics Saturday Evening," which, by the 
way, is never announced beforehand, and were each provided with the 



92 The St. Mary's Muse. 



" Australian Ballot" containing the list of subjects but no nominations 
and each girl filled out the ballot according to her individual preference. 
The Muse Committee of Seniors then had to work their hardest for 
an hour counting the ballots. Then at nine o'clock the girls re-as- 
sembled to be presented with the "Second Ballots" containing the 
•names of the three girls who stood highest in each subject on the First 
Ballot. The Second Ballots were then counted and the posted list 
next morning announced the names of those chosen by receiving the 
highest vote. 

The 1914 selections are: 

Most Influential Myrtle Warren 

Most Popular Lanie Hales 

Mast Talented Elizabeth Tarry- 
Best All-round Agnes Barton 

Prettiest Mary Webber Williams 

Most Practical Margaret Bottum 

Most Attractive Lanie Hales 

Best Dancer Winifred Rogers 

Wittiest Anne Brimley 

Most Original Adelaide Parker 

Most Courteous Naomi Barnes 

Handsomest Sudie Huff 

Most Thoughtful Laura Clark 

Most Athletic Cornelia Waring 

Jolliest Arabelle Thomas 

Most Interesting Lanie Hales 

Most Ambitious Julia Cooper 

Most Conscientious Annie Cameron 

Most Wide-awake Louise White 

Greatest Chatterbox Nellie Dodd 

Best Talker Lanie Hales 

Neatest Laura Margaret Hoppe 

Most Musical Elizabeth Tarry 

Most Optimistic Camelia London 

Most Tactful Helen Peoples 



The Class of 1914 

Everybody and everything seems "on the go" in the rush of events 
after Easter, but none are more occupied than the Seniors, who cannot 
but remember that their active days at St. Mary's are drawing to a 
close and who want the more therefore to make the most of them, 
while Senior Essays and Class Day preparations and the various other 
excitements keep them ever busy. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 93 

There are sixteen members of the graduating class this year : 

Myrtle Warren, President Greenville 

Julia Washington Allen Goldsboro 

Emma Bettis Bouknight Johnston, S. C. 

Julia Horner Cooper Oxford 

Sophronia Moore Cooper Oxford 

Grace Kearney Crews .Raleigh 

Sallie Kirk Heyward Beaufort, S. C. 

Laura Margaret Hoppe Marietta, Ga. 

Melba McCullers Clayton 

Susie Mclver Cheraw, S. C. 

Kate Hale Silver Raleigh 

Josephine Valentine Smith Rocky Mount 

Mary Clark Smith Charlotte 

Mary Glenn Tyson Carthage 

Nellie Robbins Wood Elizabeth City 

Laura Placidia Clark Scotland Neck 



MEMORY RHYMES 



The Commandments 

1. Thou shalt have none other God but Me; 

2. Before no idol bow the knee. 

3. Take not the name of God in vain. 

4. Nor dare the Sabbath day profane. 

5. Give to thy parents honor due. 

6. Take heed that thou no murder do. 

7. Abstain from word or deed unclean. 

8. Nor steal, though thou art poor and mean. 

9. Make not a sinful lie nor love it. 

10. What is thy neighbor's do not covet. 



BooKs of the Old Testament 

In Genesis the world was made 

By God's creative hand; 
In Exodus the Hebrews marched 

To gain the promised land. 
Leviticus contains the law, 

Holy and just and good; 
Numbers records the tribes enrolled, 

All sons of Abraham's blood. 
Moses, in Deuteronomy, 

Records God's mighty deeds; 



94 The St. Mart's Muse. 



Brave Joshua into Canaan's land 

The hosts of Israel leads. 
In Judges their rebellion oft 

Provokes the Lord to smite; 
But Ruth records the faith of one 

Well pleasing in His sight. 
In First and Second Samuel 

Of Jesse's sons we read. 
Ten tribes in First and Second Kings 

Revolted from his seed. 
The First and Second Chronicles, 

See Judah captive made; 
But Ezra leads a remnant back 

By princely Cyrus' aid. 
The city walls of Zion 

Nehemiah builds again, 
Whilst Esther saves her people 

From the plots of wicked men. 
In Job we read how faith will live 

Beneath affliction's rod, 
And David's Psalms are precious songs 

To every child of God. 
The Proverbs, like a goodly string 

Of choicest pearls appear. 
Ecclesiastes teaches man 

How vain are all things here. 
The mystic Song of Solomon 

Excels sweet Sharon's rose, 
Whilst Christ, the Saviour and the King, 

The rapt Isaiah shows. 
The warning Jeremiah 

Apostate Israel scorns, 
His plaintive Lamentations 

Their awful downfall mourns. 
Ezekiel tells in wondrous words 

Of dazzling mysteries, 
Whilst kings and empires yet to come 

Daniel in vision sees. 
Of judgment and of mercy 

Hosea loves to tell. 
Joel describes the blessed days 

When God with man shall dwell. 
Among Tekoa's herdsmen 

Amos received his call, 
Whilst Obadiah prophesies 

Of Edom's final fall. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 95 

Jonah enshrines a wondrous type 

Of Christ our risen Lord. 
Micah pronounces Judah lost, 

Lost, but again restored. 
Nahum declares on Nineveh 

Just judgment shall be poured. 
A view of Chaldea's coming doom 

Habakkuk's visions give. 
Next Zephaniah warns the Jews 

To turn, repent, and live. 
Haggai wrote to those who saw 

The Temple built again, 
And Zachariah prophesied 

Of Christ's triumphant reign. 
Malachi was the last who touched 

The high prophetic chord; 
Its final notes sublimely show 

The coming of the Lord! — Selected. 



FROM EASTER TO COMMENCEMENT, 1914 



April - May 

Events scheduled in and out of School in which St. Mary's is interested. 
April 12, Easter Day. 

8:30 a.m.: Early Communion. Choral Service. 
11:00 a.m.: Easter Service and Sermon. Lenten Offering. 

5:00 p.m.: Confirmation Service. Annual visit of the Bishop. 
April 13, Monday: Easter Egg Hunt, 7 p. m. 

April 15, Wednesday: Tucker-Cheshire "Wedding in the Chapel, 7:30 p. m. 
April 16, Thursday: Certificate Recital in Piano, Miss Josephine V. Smith, 

5:30 p. m. 
April 18, Saturday: Final Debate. Sigma Lambda vs. Alpha Rho, 8:15. 
April 20, Monday: Certificate Recital in Elocution, Miss Virgina Bonner, 8:15 p.m. 
April 22, Wednesday: Root-Smith Wedding in Christ Church. 
April 23, Thursday: Pupil's Recital. Pupils of Miss Phillips, 5:30. 
April 25, Saturday: Muse Play— "Out of Town," 8:15. 
April 27, Monday: Elocution Recital. Pupils of Miss Davis, 8:15. 
April 30, Thursday: Certificate Recital in Piano, Miss Mary Clark Smith, 5:30; 

Vass-Root Wedding in the Chapel, 7:30. 
May 1, Friday: May Day Exercises. 
May 2, Monday: School Party, 8:00. 
May 4, Monday: Madame Gadski Recital. 



96 The St. Maet's Muse. 



May 7, Thursday: Certificate Recital in Piano, Miss Helen Wright, 8:15. 

May 9, Saturday: Junior-Senior Party, 8:00. 

May 11, Monday: Coburn Players at A. & M. College. 

May 12, Tuesday. Alumnae Day; Alumnae Luncheon, 1:30; Alumnae Exercises, 

2:30; Coburn Players at A. & M. College; South Carolina Council 

meets at Greenville. 
May 5-6, Tuesday-Wednesday: Murchison Scholarship Examination. 
May 14, Thursday: Pupils' Recital. Junior and Senior Music Pupils, 5:30. 
May 16, Saturday: Annual Chorus Recital, 8:15; East Carolina Council meets 

at Wilmington. 
May 18, Monday: Diploma Recital in Piano, Miss Elizabeth Tarry, 8:15. 
May 20, Wednesday: North Carolina Council meets in Raleigh at the new 

Church of the Good Shepherd. 
May 19-21, Tuesday-Thursday: Senior Examinations. 
May 21, Thursday: Ascension Day. 
May 21-23, Thursday-Saturday: Final Examinations. 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES. 

May 23, Saturday: Annual Elocution Recital, 8:15; "The Adventure of Lady 

Ursula." 
May 24, Sunday: Commencement Sermon, 11:00, Bishop Mann; Alumnae Serv- 
ice, 5:00. 
May 25, Monday: Class Day Exercises, 11:00; Art Exhibit, 3:00-5:00; Alumnae 
Meeting, 4:00-6:00; Annual Concert, 8:30; Rector's Reception, 9:30. 
May 26, Tuesday: Commencement Exercises, 11:00; Annual Address by Dr. 

Drury of St. Paul's School, Concord. 
June 1-6 : St. Mary's Conference and Sunday School Institute. 



READ !— M ARK I— ACT ! 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Mtjse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays them 
to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that it is 
their loss, not ours. 



Raleigh's Exclusive Store for Ladies' and Misses 

ReadytO' Wear Garments 

Ten per cent off to College Girls 



^£X)xax&& 




» Exclusive 

9 

% Millinery 

I 



We shall be glad to receive your subscription to 

THE ANNUAL MUSE 

$3.00 

Ready on Class Day, May 25th 



THE DOBBIN-FERRALL GO. 




THE STORE OF QUALITY 


" It's worth the difference " 


Dry Goods 




OF AXX, KINDS 




MILLINERY 


THE TYREE STUDIO 


-»£§#*#€«■ 




Tailored Suits and Coats, Carpets, Cur- 


" Workers in Artistic Photography " 


tains, Draperies, etc. 




LADIES' FINE SHOES AND SLIPPERS 





Advertisements. 



Established 1858 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



St. Mary's Girls are always welcome 
at our store. 



ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO. 

127 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N C. 

CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

AT J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 
LEADING FLORISTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 

BALEIGH, N. C. 



THOMAS A. PARTIN COMPANY 

LADIES' TAILORED SUITS, 
COATS, SKIRTS AND WAISTS 
DAY AND EVENING DRESSES 

WE SELL GOSSARD'S LACE 
FRONT CORSETS 

131 Fayetteville Street, 
Raleigh, N. C. 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON GO. 



COAL, WOOD, 
ICE, BRICK 



122 Fayetteville St. 



Raleigh, N. C. 



THE ALDERMAN CHINA COMPANY 

C A.NDY — CHINA — TOYS 
PICTURES STATIONERY 



COMING NUMBERS OF THE MUSE. 



April 18 
April 25 
May 2 

May 9 



Tenth Anniversary and Easter Number. 
St. Mary's Girl Number. 
Sixth Alumnse Number. 
Pre-commencement Number. 



Why Is 




Brantley's Fountain 


BOYLAISUPEARCE CO. 


The 


The Greatest Store in the City 




FOR THE 


MOST POPULAR? 


SCHOOL GIKLS 


Ask the Girls 





Advertisements. 



STATIONERY 

College Linen 
Cameras and Supplies 
The OFFICE STATIONERY CO. 

Behind King'Crowell 
Bell Phone 135 

The Southern Educational Bureau 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Twenty-two years successful experience securing 
desirable teachers for schools and colleges and 
placing competent teachers in satisfactory posi- 
tions. 

CONSERVATIVE AND CONFIDENTIAL 

C. E. HARTGE 
ARCHITECT 



CAROLINA POWER AND LIGHT COMPANY 

Electric Light 
and Power 



Both Phones: 



174 
226 



Jolly & Wynne Jewelry Co. 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

No. 1 28 Fayetteville Street 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



H. STEINMETZ FLORIST 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns, all kinds of plants. 

Raleigh, N. C. Phone 113 



FAMILIAR LINES. 
(Arranged so that the Freshman can always remember them.) 

The boy stood on the burning deck, 

His fleece was white as snow; 
He stuck a feather in his hat, 

John Anderson, my Jo. 
"Come back, come back!" he cried in grief, 

From India's coral strand. 
The frost is on the pumpkin, 

And the village smithy stands. 
Ye banks and braes o' bonny Doon, 

Across the sands o' Dee. 
Can you forget that night in June, 

My country, 'tis of thee! 



KING'S GROCERY 


H 


WALICOVEK 

The Shoe for You 


"The Little Store" 


WALK-OVER SHOE SHOP 






PxALEIGH, N. C. 


HELLER'S SHOE STORE 




HERBERT ROSENTHAL 


GYMNASIUM SHOES 




Ladies' Fine Shoes 



Advertisements. 



S. GLASS THE LADIES' STORE 

Everything up-to-date for Ladies, Misses, and 
Children. Ready-made wearing apparel. 



210 Fayetteville Street 



Raleigh, N. C. 



SHOES! WHOSE? 

POOL & CROCKER 

124 Fayetteville Street. 

INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE 

Best Companies Represented. Bonding Solicited 

The Mechanics Savings Bank 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

YOUNG & HUGHES 

Plumbers, Steam Fitters, 

Hot Water Heating 
S. Wilmington Street 



KING-CROWELL'S DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN 

Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets 

ATLANTIC FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Home Company. Home Capital. 

Safe, Secure and Successful. 

CHAS. E. JOHNSON, A. A. THOMPSON, 
President. Treasurer. 

R. S. BUSBEE, Secretary. 

HUNTER-RAND COMPANY 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS SUITS, MILLINERY AND SHOES 

208 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. G. 



THE OSTRICH. 

The ostrich is a silly bird, 

With scarcely any mind; 
He often runs so very fast 

He leaves himself behind; 

And when he gets there has to stand 
And hang about till night, 

Without a blessed thing to do 
Until he comes in sight. 



. ROSENTHAL 
5 GO. 

GROCERS 



WILMINGTON & HARGETT STS. 



MARRIAGE 

INVITATIONS 

and Visiting Cards 

Correctly and Promptly Engraved 



Send for samples and prices 



Steel Die and Copper Plate Engravers 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



HIGH GRADE TOILET ARTICLES 
The Wake Drug Store. Phones 228 


WHITE ICE CREAM CO. 

BEST 
ICE 


T. F. BROCKWELL 

All Kinds of Keys Bicycle Supplies 
Typewriters of all Kinds Repaired. 


CREAM 
Phone 123 Cor. SALISBURY AND HARGETT STS. 






DARNELL & THOMAS 

ONE-PRICE MUSIC HOUSE 


T. W. BLAKE 

RICH JEWELRY Mail orders solicited 


PESCUD'S BOOK STORE 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


12 W. Hargett St. 




RALEIGH FLORAL COMPANY 


BRETSCH'S BAKERY 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 


REGINALD HAMLET DRUG STORE 


Raleigh French Dry Cleaning Company 


Saunders Street 


Corner Blount and Morgan Streets 




HOTEL GIERSCH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


HICKS' UP-TOWN DRUG STORE Phone 107 
PROMPT DELIVERY 



There was a young lady of weight 
Who loved to lean long on the gate; 
When a young man she knew 
Was a-leaning there ktew, 
She was in a heavenly steight. 



Norfolk Southern Railroad 

ROUTE OF THE "NIGHT EXPRESS" 

New Short Line Through Eastern North Carolina 

DIRECT LINE BETWEEN 

NORFOLK jjSSJK 

Via WASHINGTON, KINSTON, GREENVILLE, FARMVILLE 
AND WILSON, TO POINTS NORTH AND SOUTH 



Electric Lighted Pullman Sleeping and Parlor Cars 

Fast Schedule Best Service 
Double Daily Express Service 



w. w. CROXTON, 

Traffic Managrer, NORFOLK, VA. 



O. TV. UPCHURCH, 

General Agrent, RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



TAYLOR FURNISHING CO. 

206-210 Masonic Temple 

SUITS, DRESSES, COATS, ETC. 



Tailoring and Dressmaking 



Special Prices 



THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

TOYLAND 

China, Toys, Fancy Goods, House Furnishings 

8 and 10 East Hargett Street 

Personal attention to mail orders. Bell Phone 438 

Harness and Saddle Horses Heavy Hauling 

CARVER'S STABLES 

Henry S. Carver, Proprietor Both Phones, 229 

Board, Livery and Exchange 
118 E. Davie Street Raleigh N. C. 

GRIMES & VASS Raleigh, N. C. 

Fire Insurance and Investments 



Your DOLLARS Count Most at 

The Raleigh Department Store 

Successors to 

McKimmon Dry Goods Company 

126 Fayetteville Street Raleigh, N. C. 

ELLINGTONS' ART STORE 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Everything in Art 

Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY 

MILLINERY 

WATSON PICTURE & ART CO. 
Picture Frames and Window Shades 

ROYSTER'S CANDY 

Made Fresh Every Day 

Call OLIVE'S BAGGAGE TRANSFER 
Phone 529 



CANNY. 

A canner exceedingly canny, 
One morning remarked to his granny, 
A canner can can anything that he can, 
But a canner can't can a can, can he? 



C. D. ARTHUR 
Fish and Oysters 
CITY MARKET 


J. SCHWARTZ 
RICHMOND MARKET 


MOORE'S ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 
104 E. Harg-ett Street 


MEATS OF ALL KINDS 


JOHN C. DREWRY 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE" 


RALEIGH, N. C. 


Ladies' and Gentlemen's Dry Cleaning Establishment 

Cardwell <fe O'Kelly, Proprietors 
204 S. Salisbury Street 


CALUMET TEA AND COFFEE COMPANY 

51 and 53 FrankliD Street CHICAGO 
Proprietors of Calumet Coffee and Spice Mills 


HAYES & HALL 
STUDIO 


MRS. FRANK REDFORD 

13 W. Hargett St. Stylish Millinery 


CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE 
Fayetteville Street 


PERRY'S ART STORE 
S. Wilming-ton Street 



Advertisements 



BUTTING IN. 

While walking down the street one day 

I heard a damsel squeal; 
I tried to stop the runaway, 

And spoiled a lengthy reel. 

I saw a brutal fellow shove 

A child beneath a van; 
I saved her, to the horror of 

The moving picture man. 

At every turn you may invade 

The moving picture realm. 
Let others ply the hero's trade; 

Don't butt into a film. 



-Pittsburg Post. 



SOUTHE RN R AILWAY 

Premier Carrier of the South 



Most Direct Line to all Points North, South, 
East, West 



Through sleeping cars to all principal cities, through Tourist Cars to San 
Francisco and other California points. All-year tourist tickets on sale to 
principal Western points. Convenient local, as well as through trains 
Electrically lighted coaches. Complete Dining Car Service on all through 
trains. Ask Representatives of Southern Pailway about special rates ac- 
count Christmas holidays; also about various other special occasions. If 
you are contemplating a trip to any point, communicate with representa- 
tives of Southern Railway before completing your arrangements for same. 
They will gladly and courteously furnish you with all information as to 
the cheapest and most comfortable way in which to make the trip. Will 
also be glad to secure Pullman Sleeping Car reservations for you. 

H. F. CARY, General Pass. Agent, J. O. JONES, Traveling Pass. Agent, 

Washington, D. C. Raleigh, N. C. 



Date Due 


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St. Mary' s Muse 


14164 
V.17-TS 


AUTHOR 


TITLE 


DATE DUE 1 ei/^qq^.j.- —.~ 





14164 
v. 17-18